Does wearing glasses make you disabled?

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Anonymous #1
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Basically me and my friends were filming for media AS and we were confronted by these two boys (about 11 years old) with slongshots. They soon left but not before one of them said 'don't go for him, he's disabled' -referring to the fact that I wear both glasses and have a squint.
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Anonymous #1
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*slingshots
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username1039383
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What the..
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gr8wizard10
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They're 11. There is your answer.
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Casprules
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They're 11.... And no...


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Sparkle24
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No.
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River85
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Basically me and my friends were filming for media AS and we were confronted by these two boys (about 11 years old) with slongshots. They soon left but not before one of them said 'don't go for him, he's disabled' -referring to the fact that I wear both glasses and have a squint.
A disability is something which has substantial and long-lasting effect on a person's ability to conduct all, or some, normal day to day activities (shopping, walking, talking, carrying, washing...).

Substantial means that it's not minor or trivial.

Long-term usually means six months or more (a condition can be re-occuring).

Having a squint and wearing glasses won't therefore leave you sufficiently "disabled" in itself, then, as I doubt your ability to conduct day to day activities is affected. Especially as the reason you wear the glasses is so they correct your vision.
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Tootles
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Basically me and my friends were filming for media AS and we were confronted by these two boys (about 11 years old) with slongshots. They soon left but not before one of them said 'don't go for him, he's disabled' -referring to the fact that I wear both glasses and have a squint.
If you have an issue that means you have to use any means to compensate, then you're disabled. I wear glasses, that's a disability; I'm partially deaf, have ASD, and sometimes rely on a walking stick. Those are all disabilities.
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River85
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(Original post by Tootles)
If you have an issue that means you have to use any means to compensate, then you're disabled.
Not according to the Equality Act 2010 and, before that, the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (see my post above). The definitions used in these is an "official" definition of disability.

For the purposes of the law treatment and correction are considered irrelevant. What is important is how a person is if they did not receive this treatment or correction.

However, spectacles and contact lenses are one of the few (the only?) corrective means that are taken into account. So what is important is how a person's sight is with these spectacles or contact lenses (not what it's like without them).

So someone who is just short sighted, and uses spectacles and these correct vision, is unlikely to be considered disabled.
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Black Rose
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No..
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meenu89
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In a word; No.
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cupcakes87
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no
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Plantagenet Crown
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No, they were 11, should say it all really.
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Tiger Rag
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No. If you have a visual impairment which can't be corrected by glasses, then it is classed as a disability.
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Bridget Jones
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If it was, I think a LOT of people would be disabled, so no, don't think so
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Seble
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To me, having to wear glasses, is an impairment. If glasses are unable to correct your vision, then I would class that as a disability.
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Tiger Rag
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(Original post by Seble)
To me, having to wear glasses, is an impairment.
How? At least you have the luxury of corrected vision. Some of us don't.
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Seble
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(Original post by OU Student)
How? At least you have the luxury of corrected vision. Some of us don't.
I was voicing my opinion on glasses not my own experience - one of my eyes has 20/20 vision, the other is blind, so no, not quite.
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Anonymous #1
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Thanks Guys
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Tootles
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(Original post by River85)
Not according to the Equality Act 2010 and, before that, the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (see my post above). The definitions used in these is an "official" definition of disability.

For the purposes of the law treatment and correction are considered irrelevant. What is important is how a person is if they did not receive this treatment or correction.

However, spectacles and contact lenses are one of the few (the only?) corrective means that are taken into account. So what is important is how a person's sight is with these spectacles or contact lenses (not what it's like without them).

So someone who is just short sighted, and uses spectacles and these correct vision, is unlikely to be considered disabled.
I can be as anal as you like regarding legislation, and if you want take "letter-of-the-law" into account, the OP didn't mention legislation. What makes you disabled is disabilities, not that the Equality Act says. Believe me, I've read it.
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