Which Of These Questions Would Be Easier To Focus On For My Comparative Coursework?

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aceySnicks_x
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Do you think Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes Teach us Important Lessons about Mortality, or is it Overly Bleak? (Theme: Mortality)
Agree: He [The Boy] was a long time going to sleep. After a while he turned and looked at the man. His face in the small light streaked with black from the rain like some old world thespian. Can I ask you something? he said. [The Man:] Yes. Of course. [The Boy:] Are we going to die? [The Man:] Sometime. Not now. (11.1-11.4)
Disagree: At night when we woke coughing he'd sit up with his hand pushed over his head against the blackness. Like a man waking in a grave. Like those disinterred dead from his childhood that had been relocated to accommodate a highway. Many had died in a cholera epidemic and they'd been buried in haste in wooden boxes and the boxes were rotting and falling open. The dead came to light lying on their sides with their legs drawn up and some lay on their stomachs. The dull green antique coppers spilled from out the tills of their eyesockets onto the stained and rotted coffin floors. (294.1)

“The Characters in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes Torture themselves with Memories of the Previous World” To what Extent do you agree with this Statement? (Theme: Good Vs Evil)
Agree: Standing at the edge of a winter field among rough men. The boy's age. A little older. Watching while they opened up the rocky hillside ground with pick and mattock and brought to light a great bolus of serpents perhaps a hundred in number. Collected there for a common warmth. The dull tubes of them beginning to move sluggishly in the cold hard light. Like the bowels of some great beast exposed to the day. The men poured gasoline on them and burned them alive, having no remedy for evil but only for the image of it as they conceived it to be. The burning snakes twisted horribly and some crawled burning across the floor of the grotto to illuminate its darker recesses. As they were mute there were no screams of pain and the men watched them burn and writhe and blacken in just such silence themselves and they disbanded in silence in the winter dusk each with his own thoughts to go home to their suppers. (261.1)
Disagree: He woke toward the morning with the fire down to coals and walked out to the road. Everything was alight. As if the lost sun were returning at last. The snow orange and quivering. A forest fire was making its way along the tinderbox ridges above them, flaring and shimmering against the overcast like the northern lights. Cold as it was he stood there a long time. The color of it moved something in him long forgotten. Make a list. Recite a litany. Remember. (48.1)

“Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes seem to say People do Terrible Things when they are in Large Groups? To what Extent do you agree with this Statement? (Theme: Isolation)
Agree: Ely:] When we're all gone at last then there'll be nobody here but death and his days will be numbered too. He'll be out in the road there with nothing to do and nobody to do it to. He'll say: Where did everybody go? And that's how it will be. What's wrong with that? (237.84)
Disagree: On this road there are no godspoke men. They are gone and I am left and they have taken with them the world. (51.1)

Are the Characters’ in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes Methods of Survival Similar to Each Other’s or are they Fundamentally Different? (Theme: Strength and Skill)
Agree: He checked the valve on the tank that it was turned off and swung the little stove around on the footlocker and sat and went to work dismantling it. He unscrewed the bottom panel and he removed the burner assembly and disconnected the two burners with a small crescent wrench. He tipped out the plastic jar of hardware and sorted out a bolt to thread into the fitting of the junction and then tightened it down. He connected the hose from the tank and held the little potmetal burner up in his hand, small and lightweight. He set it on the locker and carried the sheetmetal over and put it in the trash and went to the stairs to check the weather. [. . .] He looked at the house and he looked out over the dripping countryside and then let the back door down and descended the steps and set about making breakfast.
Disagree: While the boy slept he sat on the bunk and by the light of the lantern he whittled fake bullets from a treebranch with his knife, fitting them carefully into the empty bores of the cylinder and then whittling again. He shaped the ends with the knife and sanded them smooth with salt and he stained them with soot until they were the color of lead. When he had all five of them done he fitted them to the bores and snapped the cylinder shut and turned the gun and looked at it. Even this close the gun looked as if it were loaded and he laid it by and got up to feel the legs of the jeans steaming above the heater. (222.1)

“The Characters in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes are more Compassionate because they’re also Less Resourceful” To what Extent do you agree with this Statement? (Theme: Strength and Skill)
Agree: [The Boy:] What if that little boy doesn’t have anybody to take care of him? he said. What if he doesn’t have a papa? [The Man:] There are people out there. They were just hiding. [The Boy:] I'm afraid for that little boy. [The Man:] I know. But he'll be all right. [The Boy:] We should go get him, Papa. We could get him and take him with us. We could take him and we could take the dog. The dog could catch something to eat. [The Man:] We cant. [The Boy:] And I'd give that little boy half of my food. [The Man:] Stop it. We can’t. He [The Boy] was crying again. What about the little boy? he sobbed. What about the little boy? (132.2-132.12)
Disagree: He checked the valve on the tank that it was turned off and swung the little stove around on the footlocker and sat and went to work dismantling it. He unscrewed the bottom panel and he removed the burner assembly and disconnected the two burners with a small crescent wrench. He tipped out the plastic jar of hardware and sorted out a bolt to thread into the fitting of the junction and then tightened it down. He connected the hose from the tank and held the little potmetal burner up in his hand, small and lightweight. He set it on the locker and carried the sheetmetal over and put it in the trash and went to the stairs to check the weather. [. . .] He looked at the house and he looked out over the dripping countryside and then let the back door down and descended the steps and set about making breakfast. (229.1)

“Colours are only Shown in Dreams and Memories in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes” To what Extent with do you agree with this Statement? (Theme: Versions of Reality)
Agree:
He mistrusted all of that. He said the right dreams for a man in peril were dreams of peril and all else was the call of languor and of death. He slept little and he slept poorly. He dreamt of walking in a flowering wood where birds flew before them he and the child and the sky was aching blue but he was learning how to wake himself from just such siren worlds. Lying there in the dark with the uncanny taste of a peach from some phantom orchard fading in his mouth. He thought if he lived long enough the world at last would all be lost. Like the dying world the newly blind inhabit, all of it slowing fading from memory. (26.1)
Disagree: He woke whimpering in the night and the man held him. Shh, he said. Shh. It's okay. [The Boy:] I had a bad dream. [The Man:] I know. [The Boy:] Should I tell you what it was? [The Man:] If you want to. [The Boy:] I had this penguin that you wound up and it would waddle and flap its flippers. And we were in that house that we used to live in and it came around the corner but nobody had wound it up and it was really scary. [The Man:] Okay. [The Boy:] It was a lot scarier in the dream.[The Man:] I know. Dreams can be really scary. [The Boy:] Why did I have that scary dream? [The Man:] I don’t know. But it's okay now. I'm going to put some wood on the fire. You go to sleep. The boy didn’t answer. Then he said: The winder wasn’t turning. (60.1-60.12)

Are Compassion and Violence Compatible in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes? (Theme: Compassion and Forgiveness)
Agree:
The boy lay with his head in the man's lap. After a while he said: They're going to kill those people, aren't they? [The Man:] Yes. [The Boy:] Why do they have to do that? [The Man:] I don’t know. [The Boy:] Are they going to eat them? [The Man:] I don’t know. [The Boy:] They're going to eat them, aren’t they? [The Man:] Yes. [The Boy:] And we couldn’t help them because then they'd eat us too. [The Man:] Yes. [The Boy:] And that's why we couldn’t help them. [The Man:] Yes. [The Boy:] Okay. (194.11-194.23)
Disagree: [The Man:] Do you want me to tell you a story? [The Boy:] No. [The Man:] Why not? The boy looked at him and looked away. [The Man:] Why not? [The Boy:] Those stories are not true. [The Man:] They dont have to be true. They're stories. [The Boy:] Yes. But in the stories we're always helping people and we dont help people. (367.5-367.12)

Do the Characters in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes Sometimes seem more Naïve than Compassionate? (Theme: Compassion and Forgiveness)
Agree: [The Man:] Do you want me to tell you a story? [The Boy:] No. [The Man:] Why not? The boy looked at him and looked away. [The Man:] Why not? [The Boy:] Those stories are not true. [The Man:] They don't have to be true. They're stories. [The Boy:] Yes. But in the stories we're always helping people and we don't help people. (367.5-367.12)
Disagree: [The Boy:] What if that little boy doesn’t have anybody to take care of him? he said. What if he doesnt have a papa? [The Man:] There are people out there. They were just hiding. [The Boy:] I'm afraid for that little boy. [The Man:] I know. But he'll be all right. [The Boy:] We should go get him, Papa. We could get him and take him with us. We could take him and we could take the dog. The dog could catch something to eat. [The Man:] We cant. [The Boy:] And I'd give that little boy half of my food. [The Man:] Stop it. We cant. He [The Boy] was crying again. What about the little boy? he sobbed. What about the little boy? (132.2-132.12)

“The Beauty of Some of the Passages in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes Depend on the Violence and Depravity of the Rest of the Book” To what Extent do you agree with this Statement? (Theme: Violence)
Agree: He walked through the woods to where they'd left the cart. It was still lying there but it had been plundered. The few things they hadn’t taken scattered in the leaves. Some books and toys belonging to the boy. His old shoes and some rags of clothing. He righted the cart and put the boy's things in it and wheeled it out to the road. Then he went back. There was nothing there. Dried blood dark in the leaves. The boy's knapsack was gone. Coming back he found the bones and the skin piled together with rocks over them. A pool of guts. He pushed at the bones with the toe of his shoe. They looked to have been boiled. No pieces of clothing. Dark was coming on again and it was already very cold and he turned and went out to where he'd left the boy and knelt and put his arms around him and held him
Disagree:

To what Extent do you agree that Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes are Horror Literature? (Theme: Violence)
Agree: He started down the rough wooden steps. He ducked his head and then flicked the lighter and swung the flame out over the darkness like an offering. Coldness and damp. An ungodly stench. The boy clutched at his coat. He could see part of a stone wall. Clay floor. An old mattress darkly stained. He crouched and stepped down again and held out the light. Huddled against the back wall were naked people, male and female, all trying to hide, shielding their faces with their hands. On the mattress lay a man with his legs gone to the hip and the stumps of them blackened and burnt. The smell was hideous. (168.1)
Disagree:

Is Evil Created by Circumstances, or is it Something Hidden inside Human Beings? Using Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes Explore this Question (Theme: Good Vs Evil)
Agree: They began to come upon from time to time small cairns of rock by the roadside. They were signs in gypsy language, lost patterans. The first he'd seen in some while, common in the north, leading out of the looted and exhausted cities, hopeless messages to loved ones lost and dead. By then all stores of food had given out and murder was everywhere upon the land. The world soon to be largely populated by men who would eat your children in front of your eyes and the cities themselves held by cores of blackened looters who tunnelled among the ruins and crawled from the rubble white of tooth and eye carrying charred and anonymous tins of food in nylon nets like shoppers in the commissaries of hell. [. . . ]Out on the roads the pilgrims sank down and fell over and died and the bleak and shrouded earth went trundling past the sun and returned again as trackless and as unremarked as the path of any nameless sisterworld in the ancient dark beyond. (250.1)
Disagree: [The Veteran:] Where's the man you were with? [The Boy:] He died. [. . .] [The Veteran:] I think you should come with me. [The Boy:] Are you one of the good guys? The man pulled his hood back from his face. His hair was long and matted. He looked at the sky. As if there were anything there to be seen. He looked at the boy. Yeah, he said. I'm one of the good guys. [The Boy:] Are you carrying the fire? [The Veteran:] Am I what? [The Boy:] Carrying the fire. [The Veteran:] You're kind of weirded out, arent you? [The Boy:] No. [The Veteran:] Just a little. [The Boy:] Yeah. [The Veteran:] That's okay. [The Boy:] So are you? [The Veteran:] What, carrying the fire? [The Boy:] Yes. [The Veteran:] Yeah, we are. [The Boy:] Do you have any kids? [The Veteran:] We do. [The Boy:] And you didnt eat them. [The Veteran:] No. [The Boy:] You don’t eat people. [The Veteran:] No. We dont eat people. [The Boy:] And I can go with you? [The Veteran:] Yes. You can. [The Boy:] Okay then. [The Veteran:] Okay. (386.2-386.49)


Thanking You In Advance :'O!
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aceySnicks_x
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Others I haven't found quotes for yet:
“Most Novels only Deal with Mortality on an Individual Scale. The Road examines Global Mortality” Using Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes to what extent do you agree with this? (Theme: Mortality)

Is Love between the Characters in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road Better than Love between the Characters in Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes? (Theme: Love)

Is Memory Heroic and Moral in the World of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes, or is it a Weakness that can be exploited? (Theme: Memory and the Past)

Do Dreams and Memories pose the Same Dangers in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes or is one more Revelatory than the other? (Theme: Memory and the Past)

Are Skills just needed for Survival or are they Masculine, Heroic or somewhat Spiritual? Explore this question using Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Jodi Picoult’s Nineteen Minutes (Theme: Strength and Skill)
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redferry
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No technical help here but I have always found it best to focus on the title that most interests you. I'm my case that would most likely be the first title but it depends what you yourself have taken from the books. Which title gets your mind working the most?
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aceySnicks_x
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(Original post by redferry)
No technical help here but I have always found it best to focus on the title that most interests you. I'm my case that would most likely be the first title but it depends what you yourself have taken from the books. Which title gets your mind working the most?
Thanks :'O!...though ideally what would be your top 2 questions...and parts of the books i should focus on for them?
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redferry
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(Original post by aceySnicks_x)
Thanks :'O!...though ideally what would be your top 2 questions...and parts of the books i should focus on for them?
The first one and the one about beauty and depravity.

I couldn't tell you which parts to focus on I'm afraid!
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aceySnicks_x
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(Original post by redferry)
The first one and the one about beauty and depravity.

I couldn't tell you which parts to focus on I'm afraid!
It's ok...i asked my friend...she likes the beauty and depravity one...but also the evil created by circumstance one...so i guess i should go ahead with the beauty and depravity one :Lol
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