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    What degrees do you think are most applicable to real life? Things you learn that you can use 'on the fly' in your general every-day activities (assuming you lead a relatively normal life).

    For example, I think that law is probably a universally useful education. To know and understand the legal system is surely a great benefit. You'd also probably play around with ethics to better understand what you think is right and wrong.

    For a similar reason, philosophy would probably be enlightening as being a way to look at the questions of ethics and morality but also have an appreciation for metaphysics and what makes sense to you in terms of a profound 'purpose'.

    The soft skills of law and philosophy are probably very transferable, even if the content is not directly related to your job. You'd be very good at writing/arguing persuasively and reading through dense texts.

    What does TSR think?
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    Medicine; people get ill all the time so it'd be great to know how to help diagnose things

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    Medicine, Economics, Maths
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    (Original post by Lucy96)
    Medicine; people get ill all the time so it'd be great to know how to help diagnose things

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    I'd prefer it if we didn't put medicine under the same bracket as other undergraduate degrees purely because its 5 years rather than 3. Nonetheless, probably you have a good point
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    Medicine & Law, most probably.
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    Medicine & Law, most probably.

    (Original post by Howdy All!)
    I'd prefer it if we didn't put medicine under the same bracket as other undergraduate degrees purely because its 5 years rather than 3. Nonetheless, probably you have a good point
    Just lol. Undergraduate Medicine students :facepalm:...

    We must be good to these people seeing as they are going to save our lives someday.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Medicine, Economics, Maths
    If you could relate your answer to the OP, it'd be appreciated. It seems like you just use a pre-prepared answer of the courses you see to be the most prestigious or whatever people are calling them today.

    Maths at Undergraduate level is probably not all that relevant, is it?
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    (Original post by Howdy All!)
    I'd prefer it if we didn't put medicine under the same bracket as other undergraduate degrees purely because its 5 years rather than 3. Nonetheless, probably you have a good point
    It's still a degree though...?

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    Sports,

    dont necessarily need a degree for alot of what im about to say but im sure a better or more in depth understanding would help more than not for the following reasons:

    general physical health,
    mobility,
    range of motion and flexibility,
    athletic ability (useful in more than just sports)
    nutrition -eat better or "right"
    knowledge could be used to gain aesthetic results (which could improve your life)
    knowledge could make you better at a sport(s) which could improve social interaction and event participation.

    again I dont think ud need a degree for all that but the more indepth the better I guess!
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    (Original post by Howdy All!)
    I'd prefer it if we didn't put medicine under the same bracket as other undergraduate degrees purely because its 5 years rather than 3. Nonetheless, probably you have a good point
    It's split into pre-clinical (which takes 3 years like any other undergraduate degree), where the majority of actual knowledge about medicine is studied academically and clinical (the other 2 years), which is more about actually becoming a doctor and dealing with patients in a clinical environment etc.

    So even if you did only count the first three years, it's still pretty much the most useful one.
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    (Original post by Lucy96)
    It's still a degree though...?

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    It is; Well done on spotting that.

    I still contest that it's an unfair comparison given that it's 5 years long to compare with other degrees.
    As I already said, otherwise, it's a good answer.
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    (Original post by Howdy All!)
    What degrees do you think are most applicable to real life? Things you learn that you can use 'on the fly' in your general every-day activities (assuming you lead a relatively normal life).

    For example, I think that law is probably a universally useful education. To know and understand the legal system is surely a great benefit. You'd also probably play around with ethics to better understand what you think is right and wrong.

    For a similar reason, philosophy would probably be enlightening as being a way to look at the questions of ethics and morality but also have an appreciation for metaphysics and what makes sense to you in terms of a profound 'purpose'.

    The soft skills of law and philosophy are probably very transferable, even if the content is not directly related to your job. You'd be very good at writing/arguing persuasively and reading through dense texts.

    What does TSR think?
    I'd say Mathematics or Philosophy. There's nothing that helps more in life than the ability to think clearly and logically.
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    (Original post by Howdy All!)
    It is; Well done on spotting that.

    I still contest that it's an unfair comparison given that it's 5 years long to compare with other degrees.
    As I already said, otherwise, it's a good answer.
    Well maybe you should have said in the OP that you're disregarding any course over 3 years, which is quite a few

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    (Original post by piguy)
    It's split into pre-clinical (which takes 3 years), where the majority of actual knowledge about medicine is studied like any other undergraduate degree and clinical (the other 2 years), which is more about actually becoming a doctor and dealing with patients etc.
    I think that preclinical medics probably don't have the 'medical' knowledge to actually do anything do they? I don't actually know but figure the pre-clinical period on its own, while a fairer comparison, is probably not all that useful. If someone refutes that then I'll withdraw
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    (Original post by Lucy96)
    Well maybe you should have said in the OP that you're disregarding any course over 3 years, which is quite a few

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    Maybe I should of although I surely made it clear when I clarified so in my first response to you. Apart from trying to 'win' an argument, I'm not actually sure what you are doing in that response :erm:
    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    I'd say Mathematics or Philosophy. There's nothing that helps more in life than the ability to think clearly and logically.
    Good choice!
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    Surf Science at Plymouth ~ you learn to cruise through the waves !
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    (Original post by Howdy All!)
    Maybe I should of although I surely made it clear when I clarified so in my first response to you. Apart from trying to 'win' an argument, I'm not actually sure what you are doing in that response :erm:

    Good choice!
    I'm not trying to win an argument, I'm not an argumentative person. I just don't see why you're not counting degrees over 3 years when a lot that are tend to be quite applicable to real life anyway, it REALLY doesn't matter.

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    (Original post by Howdy All!)
    Maybe I should of although I surely made it clear when I clarified so in my first response to you. Apart from trying to 'win' an argument, I'm not actually sure what you are doing in that response :erm:

    Good choice!
    Funny that. You told me that in your considered opinion that Maths wasn't really useful in real life.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Funny that. You told me that in your considered opinion that Maths wasn't really useful in real life.
    I just asked for your rationale and asked a question for you to rebut - the person who responded later on gave a reason in that it helps you to think clearly and logically which he argued is the most useful skill for life. If you'd made an actual case rather than just spouting names then I'd have given a different response.
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    I get the feeling that science degrees are not that much use for real life. Once you get beyond the basics, the information is far too specific to be of much use. Or maybe I'm just saying this because I've spent today studying the metabolism of E. coli.


    Chemistry may be useful though because everyone wants to make homemade explosives at some point.
 
 
 

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