What is logic? Watch

Mworswick
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As part of some philosophy degrees you study logic. Obviously I know what it is but how is it studied
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quirksy
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Well I'm currently studying AS Philosophy, so someone doing at degree level might be able to explain better, but here goes:

For every argument, you need two things for it to be plausible/successful: logic and evidence. There are 2 main types of logic: inductive and deductive.

Inductive logic is based on experience of past events, so a posteriori/sensory knowledge, and you use premises to come to the most probable conclusion. For example, you could see someone's hair is wet, and you see that it's raining outside, so you induce the conclusion that their hair is wet because it is raining outside.

Deductive logic argues towards a logically necessary/certain conclusion rather than just the most probable, as it's based on a priori knowledge, in other words, things we know that are true by definition. For example, we know that by definition, a bachelor is an unmarried man, and if someone is a bachelor, then we deduce the conclusion that that person must be an unmarried man.

So in philosophy we study each of these types of logic, and analyse what kind of logic various theories use, and analyse them based on this, e.g. how much we can trust the evidence used/how certain the conclusion drawn from this is.

Hope this answers your question!
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Mworswick
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(Original post by quirksy)
Well I'm currently studying AS Philosophy, so someone doing at degree level might be able to explain better, but here goes:

For every argument, you need two things for it to be plausible/successful: logic and evidence. There are 2 main types of logic: inductive and deductive.

Inductive logic is based on experience of past events, so a posteriori/sensory knowledge, and you use premises to come to the most probable conclusion. For example, you could see someone's hair is wet, and you see that it's raining outside, so you induce the conclusion that their hair is wet because it is raining outside.

Deductive logic argues towards a logically necessary/certain conclusion rather than just the most probable, as it's based on a priori knowledge, in other words, things we know that are true by definition. For example, we know that by definition, a bachelor is an unmarried man, and if someone is a bachelor, then we deduce the conclusion that that person must be an unmarried man.

So in philosophy we study each of these types of logic, and analyse what kind of logic various theories use, and analyse them based on this, e.g. how much we can trust the evidence used/how certain the conclusion drawn from this is.

Hope this answers your question!
I am doing AS philosophy myself and have studied the things you mentioned. On a uni website next to the logic module it said (A-level maths not required), which made me think it must be more mathematical than that.
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