Do you trust the food industry?

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t.b.s
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Slightly random question, but do you have trust in the food you buy? from the supermarket from takeaways anywhere really. We all need to eat so that doesn't leave us with too much choice anyway. But really do always trust you are eating is what it says on the label? Is there any food you don't trust at all or are you not to bothered either way.

Really interested in peoples perceptions.
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legache
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I completed the survey... very interesting points!!! I trust foods (meats especially) if they originate in the UK, are fresh and are more expensive than others. You get what you pay for!
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t.b.s
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(Original post by legache)
I completed the survey... very interesting points!!! I trust foods (meats especially) if they originate in the UK, are fresh and are more expensive than others. You get what you pay for!
Thanks appreciate it! I definitely agree with you get what you pay for and it's why companies like Iceland and not Waitrose were involved in the horse meat scandal ... but there are always going to be people/companies trying to get away with what they can. I guess people are generally trusting and that's why it's always shocking when we hear of news like the horse meat scandal because you just don't think that would be the case.
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Alfissti
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Generally trust the food industry in Nordic countries for as long as their supply chain is within Nordic countries too which thankfully most tend to be.

I don't trust the food industry from most countries and the moment it has any substantial shareholders from China or USA involved I tend to stay clear of such companies, hence why I stopped consuming Weetabix.

Never been too trusting of the UK food industry as there simply been too many scandals, most of you would be too young to remember but there was the "Mad Cow Disease" that plagued much of Britain and later there was FMD as well. While it doesn't mean I don't consume meat from UK I'm very mindful of its source and generally I only tend to buy direct from very specialist suppliers.
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t.b.s
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(Original post by Alfissti)
Generally trust the food industry in Nordic countries for as long as their supply chain is within Nordic countries too which thankfully most tend to be.

I don't trust the food industry from most countries and the moment it has any substantial shareholders from China or USA involved I tend to stay clear of such companies, hence why I stopped consuming Weetabix.

Never been too trusting of the UK food industry as there simply been too many scandals, most of you would be too young to remember but there was the "Mad Cow Disease" that plagued much of Britain and later there was FMD as well. While it doesn't mean I don't consume meat from UK I'm very mindful of its source and generally I only tend to buy direct from very specialist suppliers.

Fair enough, I'd heard of mad cow disease and know people who still do not eat beef because of the epidemic, so incidences like such really can have quite an effect on how people perceive food.

Buying direct from suppliers such as local butchers or avoiding processed meats is probably a good way of ensuring you are buying what you think you are. Not everyone has this option though, meat is expensive and that's why people started cutting corners and ended up with horsemeat in a number of products. For some people the only option is cheap meat so would it be better if companies were more honest and were very clear on the percentage of meat in the products and exactly what type(s) of meat contained or is it better to be deceived into thinking you're buying a product that is simply labeled as something that it probably really shouldn't be if that is your only option anyway?

Are there other foods apart from meat that you are wary of?
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Swanbow
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I usually buy fresh food so most of my meat comes from the UK & Ireland. I don't trust ready meals, and rarely buy them.

Survey done
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Alfissti
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(Original post by t.b.s)
Fair enough, I'd heard of mad cow disease and know people who still do not eat beef because of the epidemic, so incidences like such really can have quite an effect on how people perceive food.
TBH, I pity most British farmers as the vast majority of them are highly ethical and good people who do the right thing but it is the few players who spoil it for everyone. That was exactly the case with the Mad Cow epidemic and the real fallout to it was how the government handled the situation.

(Original post by t.b.s)
Buying direct from suppliers such as local butchers or avoiding processed meats is probably a good way of ensuring you are buying what you think you are. Not everyone has this option though, meat is expensive and that's why people started cutting corners and ended up with horsemeat in a number of products. For some people the only option is cheap meat so would it be better if companies were more honest and were very clear on the percentage of meat in the products and exactly what type(s) of meat contained or is it better to be deceived into thinking you're buying a product that is simply labeled as something that it probably really shouldn't be if that is your only option anyway?
True not everyone has this option but most people have the option to instead eat less meat but buy better quality ones. This is especially true with chicken breasts, vast majority of cheap ones tend to be pumped up with water.

While buying direct from farm might not be practical for many you can certainly buy from outlets that supply a quality product and most these days don't sell it any more than your average UK supermarket.

While labelling will work in the short term it is unlikely that this would be a long term solution.

(Original post by t.b.s)
Are there other foods apart from meat that you are wary of?
Fish is something I'm very much more concerned than beef and lamb these days. One of the main problems with it is fish farming that are farmed in even worse conditions than the dirtiest pig pen you could find. This is especially true for salmon and fish lice is a very common problem with it. In addition salmon farming while it is great for the wild fish stocks it is actually horrendous for water pollution.

Grains are also something I tend to be mindful off, I generally don't touch anything that is planted or packed in China or USA. Nothing to do with GMO but more to do with the amount of pesticides and chemical fertilizers that are sprayed on them. Due to it being a commodity and prices ex-farm simply keeps being pushed down, that simply means farmers are under huge pressures to gain as much yields as possible and that means cutting corners and not losing any crops.

Fruits and vegetables, this is also becoming an issue. This is especially the case with processed ones that are made into juice or jams. I find too much of it to be not what they claim and too many of them have more sugar than the percentages would suggest. There was a program on tv here once that checked the sugar levels in several different packs of orange and apple juice, the vast majority of them exceeded what was stated.
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t.b.s
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(Original post by Alfissti)
TBH, I pity most British farmers as the vast majority of them are highly ethical and good people who do the right thing but it is the few players who spoil it for everyone. That was exactly the case with the Mad Cow epidemic and the real fallout to it was how the government handled the situation.



True not everyone has this option but most people have the option to instead eat less meat but buy better quality ones. This is especially true with chicken breasts, vast majority of cheap ones tend to be pumped up with water.

While buying direct from farm might not be practical for many you can certainly buy from outlets that supply a quality product and most these days don't sell it any more than your average UK supermarket.

While labelling will work in the short term it is unlikely that this would be a long term solution.



Fish is something I'm very much more concerned than beef and lamb these days. One of the main problems with it is fish farming that are farmed in even worse conditions than the dirtiest pig pen you could find. This is especially true for salmon and fish lice is a very common problem with it. In addition salmon farming while it is great for the wild fish stocks it is actually horrendous for water pollution.

Grains are also something I tend to be mindful off, I generally don't touch anything that is planted or packed in China or USA. Nothing to do with GMO but more to do with the amount of pesticides and chemical fertilizers that are sprayed on them. Due to it being a commodity and prices ex-farm simply keeps being pushed down, that simply means farmers are under huge pressures to gain as much yields as possible and that means cutting corners and not losing any crops.

Fruits and vegetables, this is also becoming an issue. This is especially the case with processed ones that are made into juice or jams. I find too much of it to be not what they claim and too many of them have more sugar than the percentages would suggest. There was a program on tv here once that checked the sugar levels in several different packs of orange and apple juice, the vast majority of them exceeded what was stated.
Thanks for your response!

I agree with you about fish being a big concern, it was in the news quite abit with cheap fish being used instead of cod in fish and chip shops etc, it's a not good but I think identifying fish once it's been processed etc. can be quite difficult and it's how people get away with it.

I never really considered fruit and vegetables but that it is a good point, it probably happens quite a lot. There are probably products such as raspberry jams that contain no actual real raspberries and juices the same.

It's just a shame that companies can be so okay with deceiving customers or not checking that there not. Overall I think improved labelling will help in some way but with regards to meat maybe more people should look to buy locally.
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Alfissti
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(Original post by t.b.s)
Thanks for your response!

I agree with you about fish being a big concern, it was in the news quite abit with cheap fish being used instead of cod in fish and chip shops etc, it's a not good but I think identifying fish once it's been processed etc. can be quite difficult and it's how people get away with it.

I never really considered fruit and vegetables but that it is a good point, it probably happens quite a lot. There are probably products such as raspberry jams that contain no actual real raspberries and juices the same.

It's just a shame that companies can be so okay with deceiving customers or not checking that there not. Overall I think improved labelling will help in some way but with regards to meat maybe more people should look to buy locally.
It isn't true that once meat is processed you can't find out the identity of it. In actuality it has become a lot cheaper to do so, it is simply called DNA sequencing and testing, this is done a lot in many Islamic countries where they routinely check on products labelled as "Halal" to see if there are any traces of swine in it. You can definitely check whether it is cod or some cheap junk fish. The question remains in EU is who will pay for it.
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redferry
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Did the survey although as a veggie a lot of it didn't super apply so I just tried to think of before I made the switch.

I don't trust labeling at all. I think even if it is what it says its probably from a different country or not as sustainable as it purports to be. I try and buy local produce where possible.
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redferry
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(Original post by Alfissti)
It isn't true that once meat is processed you can't find out the identity of it. In actuality it has become a lot cheaper to do so, it is simply called DNA sequencing and testing, this is done a lot in many Islamic countries where they routinely check on products labelled as "Halal" to see if there are any traces of swine in it. You can definitely check whether it is cod or some cheap junk fish. The question remains in EU is who will pay for it.
Well let's just hope it is cheap junk fish and not cod. That's some mislabelling I can definitely get behind.
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Welsh Bluebird
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Don't trust the food industry at all but id sure as hell rather take the risk than go out fighting animals myself to live and to be honest if i can tuck into a kebab after a night out then a bit of dodgy meat from the supermarket isn't gonna touch me.

If its got protein in it then I'm happy
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Ripper-Roo
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t.b.s
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(Original post by Alfissti)
It isn't true that once meat is processed you can't find out the identity of it. In actuality it has become a lot cheaper to do so, it is simply called DNA sequencing and testing, this is done a lot in many Islamic countries where they routinely check on products labelled as "Halal" to see if there are any traces of swine in it. You can definitely check whether it is cod or some cheap junk fish. The question remains in EU is who will pay for it.
I don't think I said you can't find out the identity of meat when it's been processed, obviously not the case as if it wasn't possible there would have been no horse meat scandal and the fraudsters would still be getting away with it. I was saying that it can be difficult to identify fish species sometimes because once they have been processed and fileted, often prepared in a variety of ways it becomes increasingly difficult to be certain that it is what is stated on the label. The technologies are advanced but of course have limitations. I think traceability is going to become a much more important factor when it comes to food in the UK. I think retailers will pay for some of it to show consumers they are taking the right steps.
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t.b.s
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(Original post by redferry)
Did the survey although as a veggie a lot of it didn't super apply so I just tried to think of before I made the switch.

I don't trust labeling at all. I think even if it is what it says its probably from a different country or not as sustainable as it purports to be. I try and buy local produce where possible.

Thanks , still helpful to get your opinion.

Yeah iv'e been trying to think what would be a solution to it and buying local produce is good, but it can be difficult. I can't think of any local places to buy groceries near me there isn't even really a market.
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redferry
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(Original post by t.b.s)
Thanks , still helpful to get your opinion.

Yeah iv'e been trying to think what would be a solution to it and buying local produce is good, but it can be difficult. I can't think of any local places to buy groceries near me there isn't even really a market.
I never get this. All cities have somewhere and the country side is always dotted with farm shops selling local veg.
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t.b.s
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(Original post by redferry)
I never get this. All cities have somewhere and the country side is always dotted with farm shops selling local veg.

hmm maybe it is just about convenience the supermarkets are all just there so people don't bother to look beyond. I live in a city and can not think of anywhere but maybe if I was to look more there would be some options.
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t.b.s
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(Original post by Mickey O'Neil)
Don't trust the food industry at all but id sure as hell rather take the risk than go out fighting animals myself to live and to be honest if i can tuck into a kebab after a night out then a bit of dodgy meat from the supermarket isn't gonna touch me.

If its got protein in it then I'm happy
I would probably rather take the risk too but when you buy a kebab from a random takeaway you know that the contents could likely be questionable, but I think the general perception would be that if you buy food from well known supermarket you would trust that it contained what is said on the ingredients list, or at least that would have been the perception before the scandal.
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redferry
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(Original post by t.b.s)
hmm maybe it is just about convenience the supermarkets are all just there so people don't bother to look beyond. I live in a city and can not think of anywhere but maybe if I was to look more there would be some options.
Surely there are grocers near you? I've !ive d in Bristol Leeds and Birmingham and it was easy to get cheap UK veg in all 3
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Limpopo
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No i do not generally trust the food industry.

I do not eat at takeways. I am selective about restaurants /eating out. The whole meat production chain is an industry of mechanisation and cruelty neatly packaged up for us so that we are not aware of the horror of it. We let others do the killing for us,a bit like the army.

Farmers have one of the highest suicide rates in the country and no wonder.

I have exposure to the fast food/takeaway industry via work and believe me, a great deal of it is decidedly dodgy. The worst case scenarios are high street curry/kebab/pizza/chippy operations. The scenes of filth,squalor and infestation i have seen in the back rooms of these places would put any customer off.

They are also often havens for criminal activity such as tax evasion, immigration fraud and energy theft.

Why do people shop there? Presumably they are ignorant of all the above or dont mind eating sh%te..
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