Can someone explain to me how there is going to be a shortage of water in the future? Watch

cel93
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When the world is made up of 2/3rds of it.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by cel93)
When the world is made up of 2/3rds of it.
In simple terms poor countries that have a low supply of freshwater may not be able to afford sufficient desalinisation technology.
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cel93
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(Original post by Rakas21)
In simple terms poor countries that have a low supply of freshwater may not be able to afford sufficient desalinisation technology.
What about in developed countries?
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Rakas21
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(Original post by cel93)
What about in developed countries?
Not an issue. Political idiocy is the only way somewhere like the UK could be short of water.
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cel93
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Not an issue. Political idiocy is the only way somewhere like the UK could be short of water.
Ok. But there is a general theme going around that wars are going to be started over water in the future.
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Jamerson
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well...if the oil companies don't FrackOff, that day will come very soon.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by cel93)
Ok. But there is a general theme going around that wars are going to be started over water in the future.
That's plausable in parts of Africa but it's unlikely elsewhere.

As i say above for most of the world outside Africa there is sufficient wealth and access to fresh water to facilitate steady supply, all UK droughts for example have been caused by significant water leakage (Victorian pipes) and a lack of desalinisation technology.

While i support the green agenda and believe in global warming a lot of what people say is exaggerated and largely excludes the west anyway.
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Aivicore
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"Shortage" is a bit of a misnomer, since water will continue to proceed through the hydrological cycle.

The problems are actually:
1. The costs of large-scale desalination
2. The fact that it takes energy to purify water (and the demand for water to produce... almost everything is ever increasing)
3. The fact that water isn't evenly distributed/available throughout the world, and though some countries have a ton of freshwater, others have very little, and need it transporting to them, but it's heavy and expensive to transport.

Basically, it's not going to be a problem in any developed country for the foreseeable future, but it could be elsewhere.
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