Nat_LPS
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#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Hi, sorry it's a little long :s
I'm doing all AS subjects atm, in Chemistry, Physics, Maths and in further maths (C1,2,3,4, S1, M1). Atm I'd love to do Chem at Uni, but I'm actually more interested in phys and maths than i ever thought I'd be. I now see them all equally as enjoyable and important. So needing to do further maths next year is still one of my aims. Science grades are higher than expected to be at the start, so hopefully i can do the same for maths.
My working at/expected grade for summer exams this year for these maths topics are C/D. No doubt I've found doing further maths this year pretty fast paced and challenging, and though i am improving (in knowing how to do most q.s without referring to notes as much) that there's a bit more time for me to spend revising units we've completed, maybe i still really need to adopt better revision techniques. I've found with science, a range of techniques from youtube vids/computer note making to rote learning and sitting in silence for however long it takes will improve understanding and the whole getting used to it thing. And obviously past papers. But with maths i've gone through website/vid tutorials/past papers - usually just one paper taking me most of a day/weekend if doing other subject homework. This is way too long and just hoping for some advise generally about revision tips/honest comments/advice on what i could do to hopefully boost maths grade especially up to at least an overall B really.
I understand the more i practice and revise now the more chance i have, and that's worked, but not enough so far. E.g any q that i don't have an example of in my notes proves not able to complete more often than able to.
Thanks and well done for reading this essay. Basically, any tips for maths would be hugely appreciated.
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m4ths/maths247
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#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
Past papers doesn't build knowledge and understanding. It tests your ability to answer 8-10 questions laid out in front of you. Many students fail into the idea they are learning by doing past papers when in reality they may be better off working out what goes on behind those questions so they can tackle anything thrown.
C3 Edexcel June 2013 was a prime example of this. Those who knew maths topics liked it, those who weighed themselves every day on past papers hated it. Being able to deviate away from the standard questions is IMO what is the key issue for many and not just answering questions where the numbers have changed.

If your expected grade is a C/D further maths may seem fast paced if you are doing challenging units. It may be considering choices for A2 as FP2 or FP3 may be very challenging.

Where to go from here?:
(1) Establish the topics you need to LEARN, not revise, to get where you need to be
(2) Find a method of learning that suits you

Of my 20 AS students this year there is not one who needs the same 'plan' to get them to their target grade and whilst papers can help very few will be on a diet of them until a few weeks out.
All the best.
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Nat_LPS
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#3
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by m4ths/maths247)
Past papers doesn't build knowledge and understanding. It tests your ability to answer 8-10 questions laid out in front of you. Many students fail into the idea they are learning by doing past papers when in reality they may be better off working out what goes on behind those questions so they can tackle anything thrown.
C3 Edexcel June 2013 was a prime example of this. Those who knew maths topics liked it, those who weighed themselves every day on past papers hated it. Being able to deviate away from the standard questions is IMO what is the key issue for many and not just answering questions where the numbers have changed.

If your expected grade is a C/D further maths may seem fast paced if you are doing challenging units. It may be considering choices for A2 as FP2 or FP3 may be very challenging.

Where to go from here?:
(1) Establish the topics you need to LEARN, not revise, to get where you need to be
(2) Find a method of learning that suits you

Of my 20 AS students this year there is not one who needs the same 'plan' to get them to their target grade and whilst papers can help very few will be on a diet of them until a few weeks out.
All the best.
Hi thanks a lot for the reply. Actually sitting down and trying to understand why i'm meant to do what's infront of me, why i need to work out That step first or why 'this method differs between these two similar looking questions' has been incredibly helpful so far. For the times when i don't understand the ideas behind some steps, or when i feel i'm at a time i've learned something and can attempt to use what i know in a more unfamiliar looking question but then not so much happens-is it just because i don't understand enough before trying and need to do something different? i think a problem of mine is where to go from here.
Sorry for all the questions, tell me if i may be over thinking this
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m4ths/maths247
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#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by Nat_LPS)
Hi thanks a lot for the reply. Actually sitting down and trying to understand why i'm meant to do what's infront of me, why i need to work out That step first or why 'this method differs between these two similar looking questions' has been incredibly helpful so far. For the times when i don't understand the ideas behind some steps, or when i feel i'm at a time i've learned something and can attempt to use what i know in a more unfamiliar looking question but then not so much happens-is it just because i don't understand enough before trying and need to do something different? i think a problem of mine is where to go from here.
Sorry for all the questions, tell me if i may be over thinking this
You have answered your own question.
If you move on without knowing something then the results will either be:
(1) You drop marks in the exam on an isolated topic
(2) You move forward with a topic in C1 that appears in C1 with no foundation which has a knock on effect.

Let's say you don't really understand geometric series questions and you are spending silly amounts of time on it. Leave it and employ damage limitation as you are less likely to need this as you are (for example) integration or trig equations.
If you don't master trig in C2 you can't master it in C3,C4 and the A2 further units.
Not everybody is cut out to be an A/B grade student and if you are predicted a C/D perhaps its a case of saying 'this is my level' and how can I consolidate before I set my sights too high.
I 100% believe that C/D grade students can get A/Bs as I see it every year with my guys but if you are racing to 'weigh yourself' and get a B on a past paper rather than establishing key understanding on key topics you are building a house on shoddy foundations.

Trig, Calculus and Algebra skills are a must regardless. From there limit the damage.

I love powerpoints to learn from. Try and find the Chartwell 'Teach A Level Maths' Series.

I think I have 8/9 different ways of learning I offer to pupils. They must decide what works for them and I will support that. Its about finding your way and building that base whilst having realistic expectations.

All the best
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Nat_LPS
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#5
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by m4ths/maths247)
You have answered your own question.
If you move on without knowing something then the results will either be:
(1) You drop marks in the exam on an isolated topic
(2) You move forward with a topic in C1 that appears in C1 with no foundation which has a knock on effect.

Let's say you don't really understand geometric series questions and you are spending silly amounts of time on it. Leave it and employ damage limitation as you are less likely to need this as you are (for example) integration or trig equations.
If you don't master trig in C2 you can't master it in C3,C4 and the A2 further units.
Not everybody is cut out to be an A/B grade student and if you are predicted a C/D perhaps its a case of saying 'this is my level' and how can I consolidate before I set my sights too high.
I 100% believe that C/D grade students can get A/Bs as I see it every year with my guys but if you are racing to 'weigh yourself' and get a B on a past paper rather than establishing key understanding on key topics you are building a house on shoddy foundations.

Trig, Calculus and Algebra skills are a must regardless. From there limit the damage.

I love powerpoints to learn from. Try and find the Chartwell 'Teach A Level Maths' Series.

I think I have 8/9 different ways of learning I offer to pupils. They must decide what works for them and I will support that. Its about finding your way and building that base whilst having realistic expectations.

All the best
Thanks a lot, you've been awesome help. It's nice to know where to start now, I'll check those out
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