Combination of two substances, completely evenly distributed throughout eachother

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therion
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#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
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I've run into a dilemma where it comes to evenly distributing two water soluble compounds so that they are as evenly distributed as possible.

Now compound A: I have about a gram (just an example amount)

Compound B: I have about 20 grams (again a sample amount)

My end goal is to somehow get these two soluble substances mixed as evenly as possible in their dry crystalline state.

At first I figured just add everything to the water, dissolve it all and recrystallize everything together. This however, won't create a completely evenly distributed mix.

The problem here is that the compound B will begin to form crystals first during the evaporation process, as there is much more of it. Thus forming vast pockets of dry crystals that do not contain substance A. There will be uneven pockets of compound A all throughout compound B once everything has crystallized. So this is not evenly mixed.

Is there another way to get something with a much smaller amount (substance A), to be evenly distributed in dry form throughout the larger compound (substance B)?

The (A) compound must remain the same. The whole goal of the project is to distribute it evenly in something. As far as B goes, I can replace it. What if I found something to replace B with that is say 20x more soluble in water than A. Then add A at a ratio of 20:1. will this still cause A and B to crystallize out of the solution evenly and at the exact same time?
Are there any other ways to accomplish a completely even mixture between two compounds, in the same sort of proportions listed above?

I'd really appreciate any advice.
I've worked with chemistry all throughout my younger life, I'm trying to get back into it. This is for a personal project. Thanks for your time.
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username913907
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#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
(Original post by therion)
I've run into a dilemma where it comes to evenly distributing two water soluble compounds so that they are as evenly distributed as possible.

Now compound A: I have about a gram (just an example amount)

Compound B: I have about 20 grams (again a sample amount)

My end goal is to somehow get these two soluble substances mixed as evenly as possible in their dry crystalline state.

At first I figured just add everything to the water, dissolve it all and recrystallize everything together. This however, won't create a completely evenly distributed mix.

The problem here is that the compound B will begin to form crystals first during the evaporation process, as there is much more of it. Thus forming vast pockets of dry crystals that do not contain substance A. There will be uneven pockets of compound A all throughout compound B once everything has crystallized. So this is not evenly mixed.

Is there another way to get something with a much smaller amount (substance A), to be evenly distributed in dry form throughout the larger compound (substance B)?

The (A) compound must remain the same. The whole goal of the project is to distribute it evenly in something. As far as B goes, I can replace it. What if I found something to replace B with that is say 20x more soluble in water than A. Then add A at a ratio of 20:1. will this still cause A and B to crystallize out of the solution evenly and at the exact same time?
Are there any other ways to accomplish a completely even mixture between two compounds, in the same sort of proportions listed above?

I'd really appreciate any advice.
I've worked with chemistry all throughout my younger life, I'm trying to get back into it. This is for a personal project. Thanks for your time.

(Original post by nexttime)
Disclaimer: i'm no chemist
(???)
Well fortunately I am!!!!

Your biggest problem is that crystallisation purifies products, thats why recrystallization works. If you slowly grow crystals you get incredibly pure crystals of the compound even in fairly contaminated mixtures.
You'd probably do better to take a pestle and mortar and get grinding it up. Thats how solid state chemistry does it!
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