Nuclear Fission and Fusion - Binding energy????

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Tillybop
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When fission takes place do the two smaller nuclei have a higher binding energy than the original?

Also the same for fusion - the resulting larger nuclei has a higher binding energy right?

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Stonebridge
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(Original post by Tilly-Elizabeth)
When fission takes place do the two smaller nuclei have a higher binding energy than the original?

Also the same for fusion - the resulting larger nuclei has a higher binding energy right?

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Yes. In both cases, the resulting nucleus or nuclei have, in total, more binding energy than the nucleus or nuclei that it/they formed from.
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flyhigh99
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(Original post by Stonebridge)
Yes. In both cases, the resulting nucleus or nuclei have, in total, more binding energy than the nucleus or nuclei that it/they formed from.


During a fission reaction, if we use the binding energy per nucleon graph, you can see how it moves upwards to iron to become a more stable element.

What i don't understand is, Why is an increase in binding energy per nucleon = energy is released?

same with fusion in moving up the curve?

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Stonebridge
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(Original post by flyhigh99)
During a fission reaction, if we use the binding energy per nucleon graph, you can see how it moves upwards to iron to become a more stable element.

What i don't understand is, Why is an increase in binding energy per nucleon = energy is released?

same with fusion in moving up the curve?

Thanks
The binding energy of a nucleus is, by definition, the energy released when it forms. (The lost mass is "converted" into this energy.)
If you move up the curve, as opposed to down it, the total binding energy of the resulting nucleus or nuclei, is greater than what you started with. That means a release of energy.
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DrQuantum
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Technically binding energy is negative as it is in a potential energy well. So for a fission that releases energy you would have an end product with a low binding energy (binding energy with a higher magnitude). And the same for fusion with an end product with a a lower binding energy.
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