Do you like Shakespeare? Watch

DouglasAdams
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
I think his name has become rather associated with boredom and schoolwork, but I'm sure there are more people that like Shakespeare out there than most would think.
I personally love the plays, and actually still find some of the jokes quite funny, but I think the dated language puts most people off.
Anyways to the point, do you like Shakespeare?
0
reply
Changing Skies
  • Volunteer Team
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
From what I've read, I do! Absolutely love Macbeth especially

Posted from TSR Mobile
1
reply
Silver Arrows
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
He didn't exist.
0
reply
Dylankj96
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
I LOVE Shakespeare! I love most of his works, but my favourite is Hamlet - one of the greatest works in all of English literature. I also adore the sonnets, I'm even doing my Advanced Higher English dissertation on Shakespeare's treatment of love in the sonnets. There's a reason why Shakespeare always has his own section in every Waterstones and that reason is, ladies and gentleman, that he is awesome. So yes, in short, I like Shakespeare.
0
reply
ThePhoenixLament
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
Love Shakespeare- it's just the sheer psychological depth that goes into characters that I love! From Coriolanus to Macbeth, Lady Macbeth and Hamlet- they were all beautiful to study (not just in class- we only ever looked at Romeo and Juliet in class) and enjoy. Plus they are performed very often and I love theatre visits!
0
reply
DouglasAdams
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by Dylankj96)
I LOVE Shakespeare! I love most of his works, but my favourite is Hamlet - one of the greatest works in all of English literature. I also adore the sonnets, I'm even doing my Advanced Higher English dissertation on Shakespeare's treatment of love in the sonnets. There's a reason why Shakespeare always has his own section in every Waterstones and that reason is, ladies and gentleman, that he is awesome. So yes, in short, I like Shakespeare.
Wow, good for you about the sonnets; never began them (yet) myself. I am exploring the issue of love within the plays at the moment though, specifically within relation to madness.
Can I ask why you like Hamlet especially? Personally, I always loved the identifiable struggles that we see the hero endure, and we in part suffer along with him. I found Hamlet to be one of Shakespeare's most relatable characters, presented as the 'Renaissance Man'.
0
reply
Asolare
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
I think I studied The Tempest // Romeo & Juliet // Midsummer Night's Dream // Macbeth and out of all of them I only liked Macbeth. I never understood the fuss about Romeo & Juliet it is one of the most tedious books I have ever read and I absolutely loathed it.

From what I've *heard* about Hamlet, it seems like a play I'd enjoy. Idk I understand why Shakespeare was so influential, but personally only a handful of plays have ever appealed to me and I wish I had experienced a lot more authors at school instead of just learning about Shakespeare for 4/5 goddamn years.

OH his sonnets were brilliant though, no denying that.
0
reply
Dylankj96
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by DouglasAdams)
Wow, good for you about the sonnets; never began them (yet) myself. I am exploring the issue of love within the plays at the moment though, specifically within relation to madness.
Can I ask why you like Hamlet especially? Personally, I always loved the identifiable struggles that we see the hero endure, and we in part suffer along with him. I found Hamlet to be one of Shakespeare's most relatable characters, presented as the 'Renaissance Man'.
You should start reading the sonnets, they're "beautiful". Hamlet is perfect for love in relation to madness, haha. Why I like Hamlet the most? It just has everything; revenge, madness, love... it's a fantastic story which gives an invaluable insight on the human character and presents the dangerous of revenge. The characterisation is better than any of his other plays, I believe, and the language is exquisite. I also find the soliloquies particularly touching. Oh, and Claudius is my favourite villain. I agree with you regarding the identifiable struggles that we see Hamlet endure but, personally, I often get agitated at Hamlet's inability to seek revenge and kill Claudius as that is, ultimately, his downfall. I also find the ending of particular interest. I could go on forever about Hamlet!
0
reply
Jjj90
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
The St Crispins Day speech is... amazing. I just know it off by heart, it's just amazing, so rousing.



I mean listen to those words. It makes the Braveheart speech look like a school play.

I must have watched that 500 times. It gets me every time.

'This story will the good man teach his son
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by
From this day
To the ending of the word
But we in it shall be remembered
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers'

It's better than sex, muffins and suntan lotion. Man... I love it.

'All things are ready if our minds are so!'

Hell yes.
0
reply
Jjj90
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Inexorably)
I think I studied The Tempest // Romeo & Juliet // Midsummer Night's Dream // Macbeth and out of all of them I only liked Macbeth. I never understood the fuss about Romeo & Juliet it is one of the most tedious books I have ever read and I absolutely loathed it.

From what I've *heard* about Hamlet, it seems like a play I'd enjoy. Idk I understand why Shakespeare was so influential, but personally only a handful of plays have ever appealed to me and I wish I had experienced a lot more authors at school instead of just learning about Shakespeare for 4/5 goddamn years.

OH his sonnets were brilliant though, no denying that.
'Come what sorrow can,
It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
That one short minute gives me in her sight'

From Romeo & Juliet, how completely romantic.
0
reply
Jjj90
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by DouglasAdams)
I think his name has become rather associated with boredom and schoolwork, but I'm sure there are more people that like Shakespeare out there than most would think.
I personally love the plays, and actually still find some of the jokes quite funny, but I think the dated language puts most people off.
Anyways to the point, do you like Shakespeare?
The BBC did a production of The Taming of the Shrew with John Clease. And yep, it is very funny.
0
reply
DouglasAdams
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by Dylankj96)
You should start reading the sonnets, they're "beautiful". Hamlet is perfect for love in relation to madness, haha. Why I like Hamlet the most? It just has everything; revenge, madness, love... it's a fantastic story which gives an invaluable insight on the human character and presents the dangerous of revenge. The characterisation is better than any of his other plays, I believe, and the language is exquisite. I also find the soliloquies particularly touching. Oh, and Claudius is my favourite villain. I agree with you regarding the identifiable struggles that we see Hamlet endure but, personally, I often get agitated at Hamlet's inability to seek revenge and kill Claudius as that is, ultimately, his downfall. I also find the ending of particular interest. I could go on forever about Hamlet!
Haha, but then would we read Hamlet and love him so if he was able to quickly take revenge and kill Claudius?
I found insights into the history of Elizabethan/Jacobean attitudes to killing a king quite interesting to help better understand the revenge aspect of the play you liked.
I will adhere to your tip on the sonnets though and make a start on them when I get a chance
0
reply
pane123
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 years ago
#13
I hate reading Shakespeare, but enjoy productions of his plays.
0
reply
rich1334
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
No, my GCSE English teacher has put me off Shakespeare for life. Thankfully I only have her for a further three months.
0
reply
Dylankj96
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
(Original post by DouglasAdams)
Haha, but then would we read Hamlet and love him so if he was able to quickly take revenge and kill Claudius?
I found insights into the history of Elizabethan/Jacobean attitudes to killing a king quite interesting to help better understand the revenge aspect of the play you liked.
I will adhere to your tip on the sonnets though and make a start on them when I get a chance
Are you hoping to study English at university? Or are currently studying English?
0
reply
DouglasAdams
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by Dylankj96)
Are you hoping to study English at university? Or are currently studying English?
I am studying English at A level, if A level can really be called studying.
It's an option I've considered and would probably love, although I ultimately wish to follow a career in law so have different conversion courses available to me, unless I wish to take a degree in law itself of course.
Would you recommend it for someone who's interested, or are there considerable drawbacks, such as say having to select a book to study from what may be a reasonably uninteresting time period?
0
reply
DouglasAdams
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#17
(Original post by pane123)
I hate reading Shakespeare, but enjoy productions of his plays.
Not a bad point; always wondered to what extent they were ever meant to be read... Originally probably none...
2
reply
SloaneRanger
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 years ago
#18
Never met him, can't exactly hate him.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Dylankj96
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 years ago
#19
(Original post by DouglasAdams)
I am studying English at A level, if A level can really be called studying.
It's an option I've considered and would probably love, although I ultimately wish to follow a career in law so have different conversion courses available to me, unless I wish to take a degree in law itself of course.
Would you recommend it for someone who's interested, or are there considerable drawbacks, such as say having to select a book to study from what may be a reasonably uninteresting time period?
I'm studying English at Advanced Higher just now which is broadly comparable to A level. I would, personally, find a law degree a bit dry and boring but that's just me. I'd definitely recommend doing an English degree if you love the subject! Of course, as with any degree, there will be some aspects of it that aren't suited to you such as having to read certain set texts from an "uninteresting" time period but I think an English degree would be awesome. And, as you mentioned, you could always do a law conversion course. What universities are you thinking of applying to?
0
reply
Swanbow
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#20
Report 5 years ago
#20
Read Othello and Taming of the Shrew for A-Level English literature, must admit that I rather enjoyed it. Wasn't previously a fan, the way we were taught Shakespeare at GCSE was dull and unengaging.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (552)
37.81%
No - but I will (115)
7.88%
No - I don't want to (102)
6.99%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (691)
47.33%

Watched Threads

View All