Are fruits & vegetables starting to taste worse?!

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Bill_Gates
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Are fruits & vegetables starting to taste worse?!

In particular tomatoes, i've never really had a great tasting tomato in so long?

Its like most vegetables now are flavourless even the "extra special ones"

and the "organic" ones
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Nowshin_A
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I've always hated vegetables to be quite honest
-Maybe it's all those chemicals they use to grow them?
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User995789
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Get some organic seeds that are non gm and grow them yourself in good conditions and they will taste great. Compare it to supermarkets where they mass produce them by injecting chemicals and all this other crap, of course it tastes awful.
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President Snow
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(Original post by Nowshin_A)
I've always hated vegetables to be quite honest
-Maybe it's all those chemicals they use to grow them?
It's probably much more to do with your upbringing to be honest. If your parents forced you to eat little bits of a large variety of vegetables, chances are that you would like or at least tolerate them now. The way to like a food is repeat exposure in small doses, and it's never too late to start. Learning to like vegetables may be tough now, but it will bring pleasure (eventually), a healthier lifestyle, and you will probably pass on the same values to any children in your care.
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lizz-ie
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(Original post by Blueray2)
Get some organic seeds that are non gm and grow them yourself in good conditions and they will taste great. Compare it to supermarkets where they mass produce them by injecting chemicals and all this other crap, of course it tastes awful.
You'll probably want F1 generation seeds, too

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Nowshin_A
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(Original post by President Snow)
It's probably much more to do with your upbringing to be honest. If your parents forced you to eat little bits of a large variety of vegetables, chances are that you would like or at least tolerate them now. The way to like a food is repeat exposure in small doses, and it's never too late to start. Learning to like vegetables may be tough now, but it will bring pleasure (eventually), a healthier lifestyle, and you will probably pass on the same values to any children in your care.
Never really thought of it that way, thanks!
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Philbert
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Some, yes. Apples, in particular seem to be so bland nowadays that I really notice when I get a great-tasting one. Buying expensive or organic doesn't seem to make a difference.

Veg in other countries seems to taste so much better, too, e.g. fresh spanish tomatoes I ate while on holiday a few years ago tasted amazing.
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Swanbow
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Can't say I've really noticed, although old people love to complain about it :lol: Vegetables taste just as good as they have always done for me
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Zeroic
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Don't they add Chemicals now to make them taste better and sweeter?
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myrtille
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Pay attention to what's in season and where things have come from. I just googled it, and veg that should be good at this time of year include leeks, savoy cabbage, carrots, sprouts, kale, etc.

You can get fruit and vegetables that taste good in the supermarkets still, but tomatoes in February are never great. Obviously you might still want to eat tomatoes (I certainly do sometimes) but you just have to accept they won't be as tasty as the ones you get in summer. I find French tomatoes are usually better when they're available, and smallish ones on the vine or plum tomatoes seem to be tastier than more standard ones.
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tomclarky
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(Original post by Nowshin_A)
I've always hated vegetables to be quite honest
-Maybe it's all those chemicals they use to grow them?

(Original post by Blueray2)
Get some organic seeds that are non gm and grow them yourself in good conditions and they will taste great. Compare it to supermarkets where they mass produce them by injecting chemicals and all this other crap, of course it tastes awful.
Every substance is a chemical, so i'm not sure why you use that word with a negative connotation. Fruit and veg are very difficult to grow unless chemicals are used to encourage their growth and prevent pests from ruining them.

Organic food are sprayed with just as many pesticides as regular crops are, they just happen to be naturally occuring ones. Some of which are far more toxic than the synthetic ones. The whole industry is based on the myth of the naturalistic fallacy. 'Natural' and 'chemical free' does not necessarily mean than something is less harmful.
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User995789
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(Original post by tomclarky)
Every substance is a chemical, so i'm not sure why you use that word with a negative connotation. Fruit and veg are very difficult to grow unless chemicals are used to encourage their growth and prevent pests from ruining them.

Organic food are sprayed with just as many pesticides as regular crops are, they just happen to be naturally occuring ones. Some of which are far more toxic than the synthetic ones. The whole industry is based on the myth of the naturalistic fallacy. 'Natural' and 'chemical free' does not necessarily mean than something is less harmful.
You have no idea what you're talking about. When I say chemicals I don't mean the make up of the plant, you could say we have chemicals as well. What I mean is artificial ones that you don't find occurring in them but are adding to make them grow in half the time and consequently it has half the taste.
Grow your own and taste the difference I dare you. If I was talking rubbish, programs like country file, garden shows etc wouldn't be allowed to broadcast as they would be shut down due to false information.
Also on a slight divergence but related on the whole, just look at some of the crap companies like monsanto use and the decrease in crop productivity forcing farmers to commit suicide.

Grow your own as endorsed by countryfile etc without any artificial crap, then comment.
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tomclarky
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(Original post by Blueray2)
You have no idea what you're talking about. When I say chemicals I don't mean the make up of the plant, you could say we have chemicals as well. What I mean is artificial ones that you don't find occurring in them but are adding to make them grow in half the time and consequently it has half the taste.
Grow your own and taste the difference I dare you. If I was talking rubbish, programs like country file, garden shows etc wouldn't be allowed to broadcast as they would be shut down due to false information.
Also on a slight divergence but related on the whole, just look at some of the crap companies like monsanto use and the decrease in crop productivity forcing farmers to commit suicide.

Grow your own as endorsed by countryfile etc without any artificial crap, then comment.
What chemicals are you referring to that grow plants in half the time? I wasn't aware of any. The main reason that supermarket fruit and veg have little flavour to them is because they are picked well before they are ripe to ensure that they haven't gone off by the time they hit the shelves. It's simple logic. Fruit and veg will taste better the longer they are left on the plant to ripen, but consumers want to be able to buy stuff and have it keep for a few days after purchase. I don't really see where 'organic' or not 'injecting chemicals' comes into it.

I've grown my own tomatoes and chillis. Both with mixed results. One year i lost all my tomatoes to disease and the other year i got a decent yield and they tasted great. Had i not used some artificial fertiliser they probably would've been a lot worse.
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(Original post by tomclarky)
What chemicals are you referring to that grow plants in half the time? I wasn't aware of any. The main reason that supermarket fruit and veg have little flavour to them is because they are picked well before they are ripe to ensure that they haven't gone off by the time they hit the shelves. It's simple logic. Fruit and veg will taste better the longer they are left on the plant to ripen, but consumers want to be able to buy stuff and have it keep for a few days after purchase. I don't really see where 'organic' or not 'injecting chemicals' comes into it.

I've grown my own tomatoes and chillis. Both with mixed results. One year i lost all my tomatoes to disease and the other year i got a good yield and they tasted great.
Google artificial chemicals in plants. And nice avoiding the Monsanto point because you couldn't counter it at all.
What you say about the non ripe bit is true, but have you heard of flash/ freezing?
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tomclarky
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(Original post by Blueray2)
Google artificial chemicals in plants. And nice avoiding the Monsanto point because you couldn't counter it at all.
What you say about the non ripe bit is true, but have you heard of flash/ freezing?
I was hoping you'd be able to tell me about them yourself. I googled it anyway and all i found in relation to the initial point of 'chemicals that make plants grow twice as fast with half the taste' was info about fairly standard plant food. Stuff which i'm pretty sure i've seen advocated on those various garden shows you mention, as helping to increase yield and encourage growth. I'm pretty sure that doesn't make them tasteless though (it didn't with my tomatoes), as long as they are left to properly ripen, which is pretty much never the case with freshly sold fruit and veg in supermarkets.

I didn't answer the Monsanto point because 1. I don't know enough about it and 2. It's kind of irrelavant . You didn't answer my points about organic food.

When you say flash freezing, i'm assuming you just mean freezing something quickly after it's been picked so it retains it's taste and health benefits, like is most commonly done with peas? If so, that's something i support.
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(Original post by tomclarky)
I was hoping you'd be able to tell me about them yourself. I googled it anyway and all i found in relation to the initial point of 'chemicals that make plants grow twice as fast with half the taste' was info about fairly standard plant food. Stuff which i'm pretty sure i've seen advocated on those various garden shows you mention, as helping to increase yield and encourage growth. I'm pretty sure that doesn't make them tasteless though (it didn't with my tomatoes), as long as they are left to properly ripen, which is pretty much never the case with freshly sold fruit and veg in supermarkets.

I didn't answer the Monsanto point because 1. I don't know enough about it and 2. It's kind of irrelavant . You didn't answer my points about organic food.

When you say flash freezing, i'm assuming you just mean freezing something quickly after it's been picked so it retains it's taste and health benefits, like is most commonly done with peas? If so, that's something i support.
:lol: You have just undone your whole argument about them needing to pick if before its too ripe.
The only downside is the cost as they want to maintain high profit margins. But it compromises on taste.
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tomclarky
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(Original post by Blueray2)
:lol: You have just undone your whole argument about them needing to pick if before its too ripe.
The only downside is the cost as they want to maintain high profit margins. But it compromises on taste.
I think you're a little confused. Freshly sold fruit and veg needs to be well picked before they are ripe, and that's the reason they are tasteless. That's common sense. Nothing to do with your vague idea of injecting chemicals.

Frozen fruit and veg clearly doesn't need to be picked before they are ripe, which is why they taste a lot better in my opinion.
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redferry
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(Original post by Bill_Gates)
Are fruits & vegetables starting to taste worse?!

In particular tomatoes, i've never really had a great tasting tomato in so long?

Its like most vegetables now are flavourless even the "extra special ones"

and the "organic" ones
Try going to a grocer instead of the supermarket. Supermarket produce is always tasteless and crap because they go for looks over taste
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User995789
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(Original post by tomclarky)
I think you're a little confused. Freshly sold fruit and veg needs to be well picked before they are ripe, and that's the reason they are tasteless. That's common sense. Nothing to do with your vague idea of injecting chemicals.

Frozen fruit and veg clearly doesn't need to be picked before they are ripe, which is why they taste a lot better in my opinion.
Taste is subjective.
I did a quick google search.

"A study of 364 children - 207 of whom were under-five - found safety consumption benchmarks were exceeded for arsenic, dieldrin, DDE and dioxins.
In addition more than 95 per cent of pre-school children exceeded non-cancer risk levels for acrylamide - a cooking byproduct often found in processed foods like potato and tortilla chips. Non-cancer effects include the death of cells.
Pesticide exposure was particularly high in tomatoes, peaches, apples, peppers, grapes, lettuce, broccoli, strawberries, spinach, dairy, pears, green beans and celery.
Study leader Dr Rainbow Vogt said: 'We focused on children because early exposure can have long-term effects on disease outcomes.
'Currently the US Environmental Protection Agency only measures risk based on exposures of individual contaminants.
'We wanted to understand the cumulative risk from dietary contaminants. The results of this study demonstrate a need to prevent exposure to multiple toxins in young children to lower their cancer risk.'"
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tomclarky
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(Original post by Blueray2)
Taste is subjective.
I did a quick google search.

"A study of 364 children - 207 of whom were under-five - found safety consumption benchmarks were exceeded for arsenic, dieldrin, DDE and dioxins.
In addition more than 95 per cent of pre-school children exceeded non-cancer risk levels for acrylamide - a cooking byproduct often found in processed foods like potato and tortilla chips. Non-cancer effects include the death of cells.
Pesticide exposure was particularly high in tomatoes, peaches, apples, peppers, grapes, lettuce, broccoli, strawberries, spinach, dairy, pears, green beans and celery.
Study leader Dr Rainbow Vogt said: 'We focused on children because early exposure can have long-term effects on disease outcomes.
'Currently the US Environmental Protection Agency only measures risk based on exposures of individual contaminants.
'We wanted to understand the cumulative risk from dietary contaminants. The results of this study demonstrate a need to prevent exposure to multiple toxins in young children to lower their cancer risk.'"
Lol of course taste is subjective. That goes both ways of course so it's an irrelvant point.

I have no idea what the rest of the post has to do with the original dicussion of what causes supermarket fruit and veg to be tasteless. Which you are yet to prove is 'because they inject chemicals which make them grow twice as fast' or that organic is better. Blind taste tests commonly show that organic food tastes no better than regular stuff https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=or...m=122&ie=UTF-8

Pesticides are still used in organic farming by the way... Rotenone and Pyrethrins are natural pesticides and are far more toxic than a lot of synthetic ones. http://www.slate.com/articles/double...esticides.html
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