Do humans have free will?

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khadeejahhh
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So my question is, do you think humans have free will and why? All ideas are welcome, though I'd prefer your own thoughts as well as religious views, philosophical views and any scholarly views.
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xMr_BrightSide
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This would be better in the Philosophy or Religion section. But hey, I'll bite.

Personally, I find it intuitively impossible to shake the feeling that I have free will. But I also know that such an intuition could itself be determined, so can't be relied upon.

The arguments of determinism are compelling, but the illusion of free will (if it is indeed an illusion) is far too strong to deny in everyday life. A bit like scepticism, we reject it on practical grounds.
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khadeejahhh
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(Original post by xMr_BrightSide)
This would be better in the Philosophy or Religion section. But hey, I'll bite.

Personally, I find it intuitively impossible to shake the feeling that I have free will. But I also know that such an intuition could itself be determined, so can't be relied upon.

The arguments of determinism are compelling, but the illusion of free will (if it is indeed an illusion) is far too strong to deny in everyday life. A bit like scepticism, we reject it on practical grounds.
So do you believe that the illusion of free will (if it is an illusion) overrides the theories of determinism?
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gr8wizard10
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Yes.
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khadeejahhh
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(Original post by Abdul-Karim)
Yes.
Could you say why you think that?
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xMr_BrightSide
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(Original post by khadeejahhh)
So do you believe that the illusion of free will (if it is an illusion) overrides the theories of determinism?
I'd say that even if determinism is true, there is no way we can feasibly live with a deterministic mindset. Choice is so inherent within our view of life.
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gr8wizard10
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(Original post by khadeejahhh)
Could you say why you think that?
Free will: the power of acting without the constraint of necessity or fate; the ability to act at one’s own discretion.
-Oxford Dictionary.

You are able to do whatever the hell you please, although there may be repercussions/consequences. Doesn't argue the fact that free will doesn't exist.
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russellsteapot
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Sort of. Without typing a novel, I think a lot of social constraints prevent absolute free will, and biologically many behaviours we're compelled to engage in aren't 'by choice'.

If we had proper free will, we'd probably see a lot more people dropping their pants and ****ting in the street.
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Stanno
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(Original post by Abdul-Karim)
Free will: the power of acting without the constraint of necessity or fate; the ability to act at one’s own discretion.
-Oxford Dictionary.

You are able to do whatever the hell you please, although there may be repercussions/consequences. Doesn't argue the fact that free will doesn't exist.
Just because you can do what you please (ie. what you want to do), says nothing of whether you are bound by fate or not. There is no reason to believe our actions anything but a product of stimulus and chemical reactions (aside from 'feeling' we have free will), so I don't see why free will should be assumed.
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gr8wizard10
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(Original post by Stanno)
Just because you can do what you please (ie. what you want to do), says nothing of whether you are bound by fate or not. There is no reason to believe our actions anything but a product of stimulus and chemical reactions (aside from 'feeling' we have free will), so I don't see why free will should be assumed.
If you want to think that, by all means. Doesn't really affect me, tbh.
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joseon
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No I don't. Why? Because of cause and effect.
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Are you Shaw?
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Yes but i'm well aware of the philosophic and scientific objections... It seems to me a notion that contradicts common sense so much has to be self-evident even if I can't yet prove or deduce a rational reason...


I'll get back to you...

(Original post by joseon)
No I don't. Why? Because of cause and effect.

According to Kant cause and effect are just ways our brain organises sensory perception.
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Stanno
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(Original post by Abdul-Karim)
If you want to think that, by all means. Doesn't really affect me, tbh.
Well, unless you have evidence to the contrary, is all...?

Just to clarify, I don't believe for a second it's possible to live a life without acting as if you have free will, nor do I see it as meaning people shouldn't effectively be held responsible for their actions.
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gr8wizard10
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(Original post by Stanno)
Well, unless you have evidence to the contrary, is all...?

Just to clarify, I don't believe for a second it's possible to live a life without acting as if you have free will, nor do I see it as meaning people shouldn't effectively be held responsible for their actions.
I'm not going to debate free will :lol:. I think someone has to be pretty stupid to think humans don't have free will, to be totally honest.
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Stanno
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(Original post by Abdul-Karim)
I'm not going to debate free will :lol:. I think someone has to be pretty stupid to think humans don't have free will, to be totally honest.
Ouch. Why?
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Lengalicious
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At the most fundamental level the universe functions by indeterminism or quantum mechanics, so I suppose if you believe that to be 100% true then a cascade of indeterministic events would surely occur up to the macroscopic scale, not really a philosopher but that's my two cents.

EDIT: I think it boils down to whether the body and brain is affected by quantum indeterminism or not, if the OP is genuinely interested I suggest you read this short discussion on the matter, quite interesting.

http://www.higgo.com/quantum/choice.htm
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Are you Shaw?
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(Original post by Abdul-Karim)
I'm not going to debate free will :lol:. I think someone has to be pretty stupid to think humans don't have free will, to be totally honest.
That's quite an irony as it implies you're ignorant of over 2000 years of consideration on the subject.
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joseon
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(Original post by Are you Shaw?)
According to Kant cause and effect are just ways our brain organises sensory perception.
Well I don't buy that. The physical universe and it's laws exist independently of the mind, as is demonstrated by the fact that it/they were around for 13.7 billion years before humans came to exist. If cause and effect was just an illusion created by the mind, then the processes that led to star and planet formation and the emergence and evolution of life would never have occured, and we wouldn't be here to ask the question.
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Are you Shaw?
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(Original post by joseon)
Well I don't buy that. The physical universe and it's laws exist independently of the mind, as is demonstrated by the fact that it/they were around for 13.7 billion years before humans came to exist. If cause and effect was just an illusion created by the mind, then the processes that led to star and planet formation, and the emergence and evolution of life never have occured.
Not really, Kant doesn't say it doesn't happen, just our minds actively shape the relationship.
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Dylankj96
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In order to answer this question, we must first establish what we mean by the term free will; to me, this is the ability to do anything we please, live in any way we wish and follow our own views without worrying about the consequences. In a realistic, and perhaps rather loose, usage of the term, I'd say we do have free will - we can all, with very few exceptions, roughly make our own decisions and adopt the lifestyle which we seek. So, in a very loose interpretation of the term, I'd argue that we do indeed have free will but, there's always a but, the extent to which this free will allows us to be truly free is debatable. In a rigid, exact use of the term we do not have free will - if we break the laws which govern us then we're put in prison against our will; thus meaning that we can't commit all actions without having to experience the consequences. Religion, which most of the world adopt in some form or another, forces its practitioners to act and live in a certain way (or we shall face the flames of hell for all eternity in damnation ) which isn't exactly free, is it? Society forces us to conform to social norms or we face the consequences, once more this doesn't fit the definition of "free". We're only as free as the context of our society allows us to be which isn't very free I'd say; however, we do have the freedom to make our own choices on most issues and follow, in most cases, the lifestyle we choose.
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