At what age should an infant start learning to read books?

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richrichie
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At what age should an infant start learning to read books?
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Plantagenet Crown
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Well most parents start reading to their kids very soon. But I'd say formally teaching them at around 3 or 4 which is when they start reception anyway.
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PinkMobilePhone
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Depends entirely on the child.
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OxbridgeAddict
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If you want him/her to attend Oxbridge then at the age of two would be realistic
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OxbridgeAddict
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(Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
Well most parents start reading to their kids very soon. But I'd say formally teaching them at around 3 or 4 which is when they start reception anyway.
3 or 4? ROFL
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lillith
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When they pick up a book and show a genuine desire to know what the words say. There is no point in forcing the issue. For some kids this is at 3 for some 7, doesn't matter really they will all grasp it in the end. Except in the case of learning difficulties.
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OxbridgeAddict
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(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
Depends entirely on the child.
How so? Parents make the decisions for their children
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PinkMobilePhone
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(Original post by OxbridgeAddict)
How so? Parents make the decisions for their children
It's not about that, it's about the child's capabilities. A decent parent should be able to assess their own child and deem whether or not they are able to grasp the concepts of reading or not.
If not, there's nothing wrong with just continuing a little longer to read TO them, pointing out the words, but not making a huge effort to actually go into the structure of phonetics and so on. i.e. not formally teaching them.
If they are ready and picking it up sooner than expected, then teach them formally from a younger age.
It's about common sense.
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rasberyl
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(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
It's not about that, it's about the child's capabilities. A decent parent should be able to assess their own child and deem whether or not they are able to grasp the concepts of reading or not.
If not, there's nothing wrong with just continuing a little longer to read TO them, pointing out the words, but not making a huge effort to actually go into the structure of phonetics and so on. i.e. not formally teaching them.
If they are ready and picking it up sooner than expected, then teach them formally from a younger age.
It's about common sense.
But what if the parents don't read to the child?
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donutaud15
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I was taught at 2 so I intend to do the same when I have a child.

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Sherry1993
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(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
It's not about that, it's about the child's capabilities. A decent parent should be able to assess their own child and deem whether or not they are able to grasp the concepts of reading or not.
If not, there's nothing wrong with just continuing a little longer to read TO them, pointing out the words, but not making a huge effort to actually go into the structure of phonetics and so on. i.e. not formally teaching them.
If they are ready and picking it up sooner than expected, then teach them formally from a younger age.
It's about common sense.
Totally agree! with you!
What I've noticed though, people that seem to have some sort of intelect often disregard common sense. These people are the same ones that will recite Shakesphear too there 2 year old child, instead of letting the child play with a sand bucket in the garden.

I have a younger brother, he's 3 next month and only now has he started putting words together to form a sentance when speaking, a little later than average, but what we gonna do? Poke him with a stick untill he talks in full sentances?
People that make comments like 'The adult decides for the child' speak so much crap. The adult may encourage a childs behaviour but cannot decide for the child, a child will do something when he/she has the capability to do so, and there is no harm in teaching a child to read at the age of 2 or 6. Every child is different.

If a child has a parent that went to Oxford, this doesnt make the child any more or less capable than a child that has a parent that didnt attend uni.
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PinkMobilePhone
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(Original post by rasberyl)
But what if the parents don't read to the child?
well they should, obviously
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RowingGoose
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(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
well they should, obviously
They should but they don't always. Sadly some parents don't place emphasis on reading at home and think school should do all the teaching. A lot of learning should go on at home i.e. reinforcement from a positive attitude toward education from the parents and through doing homework.
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PinkMobilePhone
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(Original post by RowingGoose)
They should but they don't always. Sadly some parents don't place emphasis on reading at home and think school should do all the teaching. A lot of learning should go on at home i.e. reinforcement from a positive attitude toward education from the parents and through doing homework.
I'm aware that some parents don't read to their children, but I'm not really sure how that answers the question the OP is asking..

the fact is that parents should be reading to their children at home, and formal teaching should begin when the child is ready.
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PinkMobilePhone
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(Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
Well most parents start reading to their kids very soon. But I'd say formally teaching them at around 3 or 4 which is when they start reception anyway.
No, kids don't start reception at 3. They start reception on the 1st academic year (so beginning of September) after they are 4.

So for a child who is born in August, they are pretty much just turned 4 when they start school.
For a child who is born in the middle of September, they are almost 5 when they start school.

Legally though, a child does not have to be in school until the first term after their 5th birthday, but this almost never happens, because if a parent chooses to hold their child back from starting reception, and instead enrols them in school just after they are 5, they end up missing out on a place at their preferred school, and in some cases they start in Year 1, which defeats the whole point really (plus they would struggle to make friends as easily as they would have done if they started in reception at the age of 4).
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x__justmyluck
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My son is nearly 17 months and has always loved books, especially lift the flap books, he wants to be read to all the time. I read the story and talk to him about the pictures, getting him to point to certain characters or objects. It'll just be a gradual transition to him reading when he's able to, you can't make a child do something before they are ready.
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x__justmyluck
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(Original post by Sherry1993)
Totally agree! with you!
What I've noticed though, people that seem to have some sort of intelect often disregard common sense. These people are the same ones that will recite Shakesphear too there 2 year old child, instead of letting the child play with a sand bucket in the garden.

I have a younger brother, he's 3 next month and only now has he started putting words together to form a sentance when speaking, a little later than average, but what we gonna do? Poke him with a stick untill he talks in full sentances?
People that make comments like 'The adult decides for the child' speak so much crap. The adult may encourage a childs behaviour but cannot decide for the child, a child will do something when he/she has the capability to do so, and there is no harm in teaching a child to read at the age of 2 or 6. Every child is different.

If a child has a parent that went to Oxford, this doesnt make the child any more or less capable than a child that has a parent that didnt attend uni.
I completely agree, as a parent who is currently at Oxford, my son is a little late walking and talking but he understands what you say to him and is perfectly happy crawling to get the things he wants. All infants develop different things at different stages. Although obviously environmental influences do become more important as the child gets slightly older.
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katyakay96
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Children will be interested in reading as early as you want them to be...developmentally reading words independently is expected between 3-5 but every child is unique and develops at their own rates. However developmental norms are important in a child's development to check on how well they're doing and where we need to take them to so they can develop further.

In terms of reading...

Children up to 1 usually begin to:-

- imitate sounds they hear in language
-respond when spoken to
- look at pictures reach for books and turn the pages with help
- respond to stories and pictures by vocalizing and patting the pictures

Children aged 1-2 usually begin to:

- answer questions about and identify objects in books — such as "Where's the cow?" or "What does the cow say?"
- name familiar pictures
- use pointing to identify named objects
- pretend to read books
- finish sentences in books they know well
- scribble on paper
- know names of books and identify them by the picture on the cover
- turn pages of board books
- have a favorite book and request it to be read often

Children aged 3 usually begin to:

-explore books independently
- listen to longer books that are read aloud
- retell a familiar story
- recite the alphabet
- begin to sing the alphabet song with prompting and cues
- make continuous symbols that resemble writing
- imitate the action of reading a book aloud

Children aged 4 usually begin to:

- recognize familiar signs and labels, especially on signs and containers
-make up rhymes or silly phrases
- recognize and write some of the letters of the alphabet
- read and write their names
- name beginning letters or sounds of words
- match some letters to their sounds
- use familiar letters to try writing words
- understand that print is read from left to right, top to bottom
- retell stories that have been read to them

Children aged 5 usually begin to:

- recognize and produce words that rhyme
- match some spoken and written words
- write some letters, numbers, and words
- recognize some familiar words
- predict what will happen next in a story
- identify initial, final, and medial (middle) sounds in short words
- retell the main idea, identify details (who, what, when, where, why, how), and arrange story events in sequence

Children aged 6-7 usually begin to:

- read familiar stories
- sound out or decode unfamiliar words
- use pictures and context to figure out unfamiliar words
- use some common punctuation and capitalization in writing
- self-correct when they make a mistake while reading aloud
-write by organizing details into a logical sequence with a beginning, middle, and end
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richrichie
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Thanks for your information are you a teacher?
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