Renss
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Hi

I'm in my first year of a levels, and i'm feeling the pressure right now. If i'm honest I seriously don't know how to imporve my grades in the subjects that i'm studying bio, chem, maths and history. I just don't understans how people manage the work load, i'm like drowning in work and exams. For example my college gives us homework like 5 hours worth for each subject area and on top of that we have to revise, but how are you suppose to manage that and the sad bit about it is that my peers are attaining amazing grades and i'm just there literally failing in all my subjects , i don't know how they do it; some read the text book over again, some have been on top since the start of september and some can do cram learning at this rate i fear that i'll fail the year and that i'll have to re-do it.
Any tips or tricks on how to destress myself and to actually attain those AAAA grades at AS, is it too late? I have 4 months till my first exam :eek::eek:

Also i'm a person who stresses and worries too much :'((((((((((((
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Liamu4
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Well for starters, try and timetable a schedule out for yourself. It'll help you manage your time and relieve a lot of the tension that you're feeling from your A-Levels.
Also, don't be afraid to tell your Personal Tutor, that's what they're there for! They can give you some studying tips or will even speak to a specific class Tutor for you so that you can optimise your learning, everyone has their own style / the way they take information in best. For me it's using flash cards! I like diving up definitions into what they're relevant to and assign a certain colour of card for them.
So, as an example for Electronics:
Yellow: Circuits
Green: Graphs
Blue with a small Yellow/Green square in the corner: Algorithms

There's a ton of ways you can help yourself revise.

The most important thing however is to keep a level head (A-level, ha, I'm funny) and try to keep your cool, getting stressed is just going to make you feel worse, I dread to imagine the amount of panic attacks people have during the exam weeks.
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Renss
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(Original post by Liamu4)
Well for starters, try and timetable a schedule out for yourself. It'll help you manage your time and relieve a lot of the tension that you're feeling from your A-Levels.
Also, don't be afraid to tell your Personal Tutor, that's what they're there for! They can give you some studying tips or will even speak to a specific class Tutor for you so that you can optimise your learning, everyone has their own style / the way they take information in best. For me it's using flash cards! I like diving up definitions into what they're relevant to and assign a certain colour of card for them.
So, as an example for Electronics:
Yellow: Circuits
Green: Graphs
Blue with a small Yellow/Green square in the corner: Algorithms

There's a ton of ways you can help yourself revise.

The most important thing however is to keep a level head (A-level, ha, I'm funny) and try to keep your cool, getting stressed is just going to make you feel worse, I dread to imagine the amount of panic attacks people have during the exam weeks.
Thank you for the suggestion, I think i'll go speak to my tutor and see what she has in mind. I honestly want the best grades this year, you know that feeling of being so motivated and then in the end you end up procrastinating :rolleyes: or trying to finish your homework (well that's the case for me 99.9243434% of the time).
I'm going to look for new methods and make a timetable again, maybe the one that I have isn't really helping.
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H0ls
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First of all, breathe.

Look at your timetable (including classes and extra-curricular) and asses the best way to use your time. I used to have college classes all over the place leaving me with big gaps in the middle of the day. Rather than go home and chill, I utilised my free periods as an opportunity to complete homework whilst it was fresh in mind. I kinda treated college like a 9-4 job. It left me with quite a lot of free time and I managed to hold down a 16 hour job because it freed up some of my evenings.

If you're keeping on top of your work then usually you'll find you have less revision to do. Try and write up your notes using the form you find best, mindmaps/flashcards are usually good for science a levels. I found them good for history facts too, which was then best supplemented by making short but sweet essay plans. I actually learnt quite a few essay plans for my history/english lit a levels and managed to adapt them to an applicable question.

As far as revision goes, remember that you probably shouldn't aim to do past papers just yet. Try doing exercises from your text book and practice essays. I found that I only really looked at the past papers just over a month before the exam after I had learnt all the information as I felt then I was getting a true representative of my ability.
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Renss
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(Original post by H0ls)
First of all, breathe.

Look at your timetable (including classes and extra-curricular) and asses the best way to use your time. I used to have college classes all over the place leaving me with big gaps in the middle of the day. Rather than go home and chill, I utilised my free periods as an opportunity to complete homework whilst it was fresh in mind. I kinda treated college like a 9-4 job. It left me with quite a lot of free time and I managed to hold down a 16 hour job because it freed up some of my evenings.

If you're keeping on top of your work then usually you'll find you have less revision to do. Try and write up your notes using the form you find best, mindmaps/flashcards are usually good for science a levels. I found them good for history facts too, which was then best supplemented by making short but sweet essay plans. I actually learnt quite a few essay plans for my history/english lit a levels and managed to adapt them to an applicable question.

As far as revision goes, remember that you probably shouldn't aim to do past papers just yet. Try doing exercises from your text book and practice essays. I found that I only really looked at the past papers just over a month before the exam after I had learnt all the information as I felt then I was getting a true representative of my ability.
Thank you, I'm going yo devise a timetable and use my free periods during school weeks to utilise my time as much as possible.
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