Physics degree vs Nuclear Engineering degree

Watch this thread
dr-jimmy
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
I applied for Physics at all 5 of the unis I applied to, however Birmingham have rejected me for Physics but given me the option to have an offer processed for either their Nuclear Science BSc or their Nuclear Engineering MEng.
I'm going to have one of these processed so that I have the offer on UCAS (probably the BSc) but I'm not sure about whether or not to consider it for a firm or insurance. As it still contains a lot of Physics I am interested as it does look to be something which I would enjoy. I am tempted because Birmingham was one of my favourites out of the unis I visited. However, I'm concerned that the course is too specialised. The Birmingham website says: 'This new course has been designed in response to demand from the Nuclear industry for a programme at undergraduate level to equip students with the fundamentals to help provide non-fossil fuel alternatives for our future energy requirements'.
This makes me think I'd be very limited in career options with this degree, and would have no choice but to work in the nuclear industry. Which I'm sure would be great, but I don't want to decide on that for certain as this stage. If I did a straight Physics degree would I still have the opportunity to work in the nuclear industry? Would this course at Birmingham really limit my options? Thanks
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
(Original post by dr-jimmy)
I applied for Physics at all 5 of the unis I applied to, however Birmingham have rejected me for Physics but given me the option to have an offer processed for either their Nuclear Science BSc or their Nuclear Engineering MEng.
I'm going to have one of these processed so that I have the offer on UCAS (probably the BSc) but I'm not sure about whether or not to consider it for a firm or insurance. As it still contains a lot of Physics I am interested as it does look to be something which I would enjoy. I am tempted because Birmingham was one of my favourites out of the unis I visited. However, I'm concerned that the course is too specialised. The Birmingham website says: 'This new course has been designed in response to demand from the Nuclear industry for a programme at undergraduate level to equip students with the fundamentals to help provide non-fossil fuel alternatives for our future energy requirements'.
This makes me think I'd be very limited in career options with this degree, and would have no choice but to work in the nuclear industry. Which I'm sure would be great, but I don't want to decide on that for certain as this stage. If I did a straight Physics degree would I still have the opportunity to work in the nuclear industry? Would this course at Birmingham really limit my options? Thanks
You will be able to use this degree as a generic degree to enter non-technical grad schemes in the same way you would a chemistry or classics degree.

Otherwise, yes this degree is pushing you towards nuclear engineering. However think on this. 47% of all recent graduates are stuck in non-graduate jobs and 9% are unemployed. This course, on the other hand has been set up because there is a perceived skills shortage in an industry which will be expanding again as new nuclear power stations are built. Therefore the options you might be limiting by taking this course are the options between serving a Big Mac and a Whopper.
2
reply
dr-jimmy
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#3
(Original post by nulli tertius)
You will be able to use this degree as a generic degree to enter non-technical grad schemes in the same way you would a chemistry or classics degree.

Otherwise, yes this degree is pushing you towards nuclear engineering. However think on this. 47% of all recent graduates are stuck in non-graduate jobs and 9% are unemployed. This course, on the other hand has been set up because there is a perceived skills shortage in an industry which will be expanding again as new nuclear power stations are built. Therefore the options you might be limiting by taking this course are the options between serving a Big Mac and a Whopper.
Hmm the thing is I'm not that interested in doing a non-technical job at the moment. I think I want to be able to use a degree to do something which will be very physics based, but not necessarily in the nuclear industry. Would it then be a better idea to do Physics alone, as that would still give me the choice to do a non-technical job but also more jobs based in Physics? Would it give me a wider range of technical jobs I could do?
Thanks for the advice.
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
With nuclear engineering your prospects are somewhat tied to the nuclear industry, however as it is an engineering degree it also opens up technical career paths outside of just the nuclear industry. If you look at the career destinations, it lists a variety of technical employers that have recruited nuclear engineering graduates, with quite a few having nothing to do with the nuclear industry.

However, if all of your five choices were physics, it seems clear that physics is where your heart is, so I would say to stick with physics.
1
reply
dr-jimmy
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#5
(Original post by Smack)
With nuclear engineering your prospects are somewhat tied to the nuclear industry, however as it is an engineering degree it also opens up technical career paths outside of just the nuclear industry. If you look at the career destinations, it lists a variety of technical employers that have recruited nuclear engineering graduates, with quite a few having nothing to do with the nuclear industry.

However, if all of your five choices were physics, it seems clear that physics is where your heart is, so I would say to stick with physics.
Ah yeah, that was what I was leaning toward anyway. Thanks.
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 8 years ago
#6
(Original post by dr-jimmy)
Ah yeah, that was what I was leaning toward anyway. Thanks.
I guess that there's no harm for them to process one of the offers for you anyways.

Best of luck!
1
reply
dr-jimmy
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#7
(Original post by Quick-use)
I guess that there's no harm for them to process one of the offers for you anyways.

Best of luck!
Yeah I am definitely getting one processed, I'll send the e-mail now actually. I only have two definite offers at the moment and the lower one is my favourite so I'm going to firm it- if I don't get any others this can at least be my backup.
0
reply
Observatory
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 8 years ago
#8
While the nuclear industry is very volatile, the physics 'industry' is rather flat.
0
reply
shahbaz
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report 8 years ago
#9
The same thing happened to me as well haha, but im not too fused and will be most likley doing a degree in theoretical physics .
0
reply
Dylann
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report 8 years ago
#10
(Original post by nulli tertius)
You will be able to use this degree as a generic degree to enter non-technical grad schemes in the same way you would a chemistry or classics degree.
What do you mean by this? A chemistry degree is as good as a classics degree?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Vitamin D
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report 8 years ago
#11
(Original post by Dylann)
What do you mean by this? A chemistry degree is as good as a classics degree?

Posted from TSR Mobile
I think they mean for graduate positions that only specify "a 2.1 honours degree"


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Dylann
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#12
Report 8 years ago
#12
(Original post by Vitamin D)
I think they mean for graduate positions that only specify "a 2.1 honours degree"


Posted from TSR Mobile
Oh - that would make sense. I wasn't sure if the OP was implying a Chemistry degree would be viewed similar to a Classics degree - for Chemistry demonstrates a far more versatile set of skills than a Classics degree that may be useful in the workplace (attention to detail, maths and teamwork for example).
0
reply
TheBBQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#13
Report 8 years ago
#13
OP Nuclear engineering is a good and stable career to go into or so my Physics tutor says.. if you are interested in this side of Physics then it isn't a bad idea at all.
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#14
Report 8 years ago
#14
(Original post by Dylann)
Oh - that would make sense. I wasn't sure if the OP was implying a Chemistry degree would be viewed similar to a Classics degree - for Chemistry demonstrates a far more versatile set of skills than a Classics degree that may be useful in the workplace (attention to detail, maths and teamwork for example).
Vitamin D is right.

I am not particularly convinced about the "transferable skills" of any degree outside of its own environment. I certainly wouldn't say that a chemistry degree has a better skill set for the work environment and the higher reaches of the Civil Service has always liked the skills that classicists bring.
0
reply
dr-jimmy
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#15
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#15
(Original post by Observatory)
While the nuclear industry is very volatile, the physics 'industry' is rather flat.
Please could you elaborate on that a bit? I'm not sure what you mean by 'flat', and why is the nuclear industry volatile?
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#16
Report 8 years ago
#16
(Original post by dr-jimmy)
Please could you elaborate on that a bit? I'm not sure what you mean by 'flat', and why is the nuclear industry volatile?
The nuclear industry is almost entirely dependent on public funding, which is heavily influenced by public perception, which is heavily influenced by ignorance and recent events.
0
reply
dr-jimmy
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#17
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#17
(Original post by Smack)
The nuclear industry is almost entirely dependent on public funding, which is heavily influenced by public perception, which is heavily influenced by ignorance and recent events.
That makes sense, why is the Physics industry flat though?
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#18
Report 8 years ago
#18
(Original post by dr-jimmy)
That makes sense, why is the Physics industry flat though?
I don't know anything about the physics industry.
0
reply
dr-jimmy
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#19
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#19
(Original post by Smack)
I don't know anything about the physics industry.
Fair enough,thanks anyway!
0
reply
Observatory
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#20
Report 8 years ago
#20
(Original post by dr-jimmy)
Please could you elaborate on that a bit? I'm not sure what you mean by 'flat', and why is the nuclear industry volatile?
Physics is government work, and there are a lot of applicants, so pay is low and job security is poor.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

Y13s: How will you be receiving your A-level results?

In person (79)
67.52%
In the post (5)
4.27%
Text (15)
12.82%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (18)
15.38%

Watched Threads

View All