Someone help me with Enzymes?

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MollyDriver98
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I truly don't understand Enzymes and it is what I need to learn for biology GCSE. I want to revise them but nothing sticks, any ideas?
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letsbehonest
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(Original post by MollyDriver98)
I truly don't understand Enzymes and it is what I need to learn for biology GCSE. I want to revise them but nothing sticks, any ideas?
Enzymes are proteins.

Enzymes speed up reactions in your body or other organisms like plants. They are biological catalysts. A catalyst just means something that speeds up a reaction.

Also the important bit is that enzymes have a special shape. In order for the enzyme to work, it has to join together with another piece like a puzzle, the other piece is called a substrate. The bit where they join at is called the active site

Enzymes work best at 37degrees in your body. That is when lots of the enzymes and substrates will be colliding and joining together.

If the temperature is really high then the shape of the 'active site' which is like the bit where the puzzle joins together changes shape. So people say the enzyme is denatured.

You could draw puzzle shapes that join together. You can also draw a graph which shows enzyme/temperature (google it).
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MollyDriver98
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Thank you so much. I know about the 'lock and key' mechanism meaning that they fit together and only fit a certain thing and I know about catalysts but this has helped me so much. Thanks
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MollyDriver98
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[QUOTE=ActualRealJamz;46459954]If you need to know anything about the names of any enzymes they generally end with '-ase.'
Two examples of this are protease, which works for proteins, and lipase (which works for fats).
With the exception of lipase, enzyme names are pretty predictable.

Thanks so much. I also know of amylase and I have heard of protease too. Lipase I don't really understand
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letsbehonest
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[QUOTE=MollyDriver98;46460053]
(Original post by ActualRealJamz)
If you need to know anything about the names of any enzymes they generally end with '-ase.'
Two examples of this are protease, which works for proteins, and lipase (which works for fats).
With the exception of lipase, enzyme names are pretty predictable.

Thanks so much. I also know of amylase and I have heard of protease too. Lipase I don't really understand
Lipase breaks down lipids which are fats
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MollyDriver98
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[QUOTE=letsbehonest;46460327][QUOTE=MollyDriver98;46460053]

Lipase breaks down lipids which are fats



Thank you
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