beu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
How exactly does a catalyst speed up a reaction? (High level explanation please) - it's for GCSE but the explanation I found is too vague and not in-depth. Cheers.
0
reply
cerlohee
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
(Original post by beu)
How exactly does a catalyst speed up a reaction? (High level explanation please) - it's for GCSE but the explanation I found is too vague and not in-depth. Cheers.
It provides an alternate pathway for the reaction to take place that has a lower activation energy than the original reaction
So if a reaction has an activation energy of 50 degrees normally, the catalyst may make the activation energy 40 degrees, so over the same period of time, more reactions would happen with the catalyst, because it requires less energy.
0
reply
Picture~Perfect
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
It provides an alternative route for the reaction to take place.
0
reply
L'Evil Fish
Badges: 18
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
They all work in different ways! As above posters have said its lowering the Ea.

Each Catalyst has its own mechanism.
0
reply
beu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by cerlohee)
It provides an alternate pathway for the reaction to take place that has a lower activation energy than the original reaction
So if a reaction has an activation energy of 50 degrees normally, the catalyst may make the activation energy 40 degrees, so over the same period of time, more reactions would happen with the catalyst, because it requires less energy.
Legend, thank you.
1
reply
denteddental
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
(Original post by beu)
How exactly does a catalyst speed up a reaction? (High level explanation please) - it's for GCSE but the explanation I found is too vague and not in-depth. Cheers.
Catalyst - a substance that speeds up the rate of a reaction but providing an alternative pathway with a lower activation energy.
Auto catalysis - when the product of a reaction acts as a catalyst for the same reaction. It works in exactly the same way as a normal catalyst.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What do you find most difficult about revising?

Prioritising what to revise (7)
10.14%
Remembering what was covered in lessons (1)
1.45%
Finding the time to revise (6)
8.7%
Finding the motivation (16)
23.19%
Getting distracted (12)
17.39%
Procrastination (27)
39.13%
Having the tools you need (0)
0%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (0)
0%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed