What is the difference between AFFECT and EFFECT?!?

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ryan9900
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#21
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#21
(Original post by ChaniBotz95)
Hallelujah!! Cannot thank you enough! I think I'm going to stick with this one before someone else confuses me again lol. Thanks a bunch
Glad I could help
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LiamMcMorrow
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#22
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#22
(Original post by ChaniBotz95)
SOMEONE PLEASE ENLIGHTEN ME! Its driving me stark raving mad!!!


N.B: Please define In simple terms, I'm not looking for any Wikipedia nonsense...that's just even more confusing
I came here looking for an answer and everyone is contradicting themselves!
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Picnic1
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#23
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Like a lot of English, it seems to have some exceptions - double meanings - that tend to harm attempts to make a rule. The general rule seems to be:

Effected is to do something.

Affected means impacted. Caused a change in circumstances / feelings for instance.

--

"I effected the authorised detonation with immediate effect which affected the building and thankfully didn't affect any people" would be a 'normal' kind of sentence.

If you had instead said:

"I effected the authorised detonation with immediate effect which EFFECTED the building and thankfully didn't EFFECT any people".

you would have been saying that the act of the detonation actually CREATED the 'building' and didn't CREATE any people. Well blow me down if detonations don't tend to create buildings and don't tend to create people ! (Whilst you could argue that a detonation could create a different looking kind of building and a different looking kind of person, this would not be the usual use of that sentence and , if that is what you were meaning to convey to the reader, you would choose an altogether more descriptive, less ambiguous, sentence to put across that unusual situation).

But then you can say "I affected an American accent" to mean that you don't naturally talk in an American accent. Yet that is more of an act, to 'effect' something, than it is to 'impact' something. Unless its use is meant to imply that we psychologically 'affect' ourselves by choosing a different accent, which gives a very harshly personal spin on any human acts of artifice.

(Being ultra logical here, there would be another far less common meaning for "I affected an American accent" which would be if you were head of linguistics in the only school in an area and, through your teaching, you somehow managed to get the entire population to change their accent. You literally 'affected' 'an American accent' in an entirely different way to my first example).

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What about property- 'personal effects'. What has my property got to do with me doing something? Merely the act of me once taking, making or being given it? The act of me defending it, consciously or unconsciously, from being taken from me? It seems like the kind of old fashioned phrase that a lawyer might have once came up with to excuse taking back ownership after death - that something is not your 'belonging' but merely something that once 'happened to you' and that you've still ended up with - an 'effect'.

But, basically, the rule still stands most of the time:

Effected is to do something, usually implying 'successfully completed' at least enough of that act for the intention to be clear what the aim of that act was.

Most people don't even use the word 'effected'. They'd be more likely to say 'carried out' / 'scored' / 'hit' or whatever verb describes the particular activity they were involved in.

Affected means impacting or being impacted. 'I affected you' or 'I was affected by you'.

And I realise that your question was 'effect' and 'affect' but same principle.
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Carnationlilyrose
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#24
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#24
(Original post by LiamMcMorrow)
I came here looking for an answer and everyone is contradicting themselves!
No, they aren't. Posts 6, 7 and 10 are correct. There is more than one answer because the words can be used in several ways.
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1347068
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#25
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#25
(Original post by LiamMcMorrow)
I came here looking for an answer and everyone is contradicting themselves!
Hahah trust me! But like post 23 explains, English has a lot of double meanings. Argh English is just so complicated!
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Picnic1
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In the course of thinking about this topic,.I have realised that it is probably gramatically correct to say BOTH

"I was effected as head teacher" i.e I became employed as the head teacher.
and "I was affected as head teacher". i.e. during my time as a head teacher, I became either emotionally moved or changed.

"I was effected as head teacher" sounds impersonal and military to me, like a person is a mere tool for their job. I would never use that sentence.

Can anyone think of a use of the word 'effected' that doesn't make its user sound a bit robotic and impersonal?
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LiamMcMorrow
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(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
No, they aren't. Posts 6, 7 and 10 are correct. There is more than one answer because the words can be used in several ways.
Yes, they are. Like you just said posts 6, 7 and 10 are correct. You haven't mentioned how the answer is spread out between those three and you ignored that there are other posts in the thread. Also when you go back and read them in some occasions people have started statements by saying "It can also" - which tells me there are multiple uses for them. The posts are not constructive to each other as they don't support or build on each other. Its just people trying to have there precious little say in everything.

Any other comments you want to get out of your system? Any other non constructive short sentences you want to throw at me?
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Carnationlilyrose
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#28
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(Original post by LiamMcMorrow)
Yes, they are. Like you just said posts 6, 7 and 10 are correct. You haven't mentioned how the answer is spread out between those three and you ignored that there are other posts in the thread. Also when you go back and read them in some occasions people have started statements by saying "It can also" - which tells me there are multiple uses for them. The posts are not constructive to each other as they don't support or build on each other. Its just people trying to have there precious little say in everything.

Any other comments you want to get out of your system? Any other non constructive short sentences you want to throw at me?
No.
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RoyalBlue7
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#29
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I get asked whether to use affect or effect all the time, and it is by far the most requested grammar topic, so I have a few mnemonics and a cartoon to help you remember.
What Is the Difference Between Affect and Effect?


Before we get to the memory trick though, I want to explain the difference between the two words: The majority of the time you use affect with an a as a verb and effect with an e as a noun.
When Should You Use Affect?

Affect with an a means "to influence," as in, "The arrows affected Aardvark," or "The rain affected Amy's hairdo." Affect can also mean, roughly, "to act in a way that you don't feel," as in, "She affected an air of superiority."
When Should You UseEffect?

Effect with an e has a lot of subtle meanings as a noun, but to me the meaning "a result" seems to be at the core of all the definitions. For example, you can say, "The effect was eye-popping," or "The sound effects were amazing," or "The rain had no effect on Amy's hairdo."
Common Uses of Affect and Effect

Most of the time,affect is a verb andeffect is a noun.
There are rare instances where the roles are switched, and I'll get to those later, but for now let's focus on the common meanings. This is "Quick and Dirty" grammar, and my impression from your questions is that most people have trouble remembering the basic rules of when to use these words, so if you stick with those, you'll be right 95% of the time.
So, most of the time, affect with an a is a verb and effect with an e is a noun; and now we can get to the mnemonics. First, the mnemonic involves a very easy noun to help you remember: aardvark. Yes, if you can remember aardvark—a very easy noun—you'll always remember that affect with an a is a verb and effect with an e is a noun. Why? Because the first letters of "a very easy noun" are the same first letters as "affect verb effect noun!" That's a very easy noun. Affect (with an a) verb effect (with an e) noun.

"But why Aardvark?" you ask. Because there's also an example to help you remember. It's "The arrows affected Aardvark. The effect was eye-popping." It should be easy to remember that affect with an a goes with the a-words, arrow and aardvark, and that effect with an e goes with the e-word, eye-popping. If you can visualize the sentences, "The arrows affected the aardvark. The effect was eye-popping," it's pretty easy to see that affect with an a is a verb and effect with an e is a noun.
The illustration of the example is from my new book. It's Aardvark being affected by arrows, and I think looking at it will help you remember the example sentences; and it's cute. You can print it out and hang it by your desk.
So a very easy noun will help you remember that affect with an a is a verb and effect with an e is a noun, and the example will help you see how to use both words in a sentence.
Next: When the Roles of Affect and Effect Are Reversed
Rare Uses of Affect and Effect

So what about those rare meanings that don't follow the rules I just gave you? Well, affect can be used as a noun when you're talking about psychology--it means the mood that someone appears to have. For example, "She displayed a happy affect." Psychologists find it useful because they know that you can never really understand what someone else is feeling. You can only know how they appear to be feeling.
And, effect can be used as a verb that essentially means "to bring about," or "to accomplish." For example, you could say, "Aardvark hoped to effect change within the burrow.
- See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/edu....580Qjv46.dpuf
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RunningScotsman
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#30
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Picnic1
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#31
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"The rain affected Amy's hairdo" means that the rain changed what Amy's hairdo already looked like. (or in the unlikely case that Amy was having her hairdressing appointment outdoors, it could change what her 'new' hairstyle was originally supposed to become. Sorry...)

"The rain effected Amy's hairdo." means that the rain is put in to the role of prime creator of that hairdo- 'Amy's hairdo' , to all intents and purposes, is what the rain has fashioned it to be. It makes no implication that any other kind of 'Amy's hairdo' was ever necessarily on the cards.

Such fun!
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Final Fantasy
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#32
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The effect of an affect is that you are affected rather than effected.
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CosmicApathy1
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#33
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
The effect of an affect is that you are affected rather than effected.
6 years old btw.....
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Final Fantasy
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#34
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(Original post by CosmicApathy1)
6 years old btw.....
Oh, must have taken me that long! Whoops!
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