Private and State school - my chance of getting into a good uni Watch

medactuary
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I attended state school for secondary school and now I attend a private school. I have heard that top universities take a liking to state school applicants more (especially for medicine which is what I would like to study). Is this true? and will this lessen my chances of getting in to the university I want?

I should also mention I got into my private school with a bursary scholarship - will they take this into account?
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seaholme
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Really it's all speculation, isn't it? Nobody would ever openly admit to this.

I personally had a weird experience with applications that my school told me was because of this prejudice, but I take it with a pinch of salt because really... where's the evidence? They can't know, so I can't believe them.

The main point about private versus state is that at private schools you get more individual coaching, a better working environment in terms of getting your A Levels or equivalent, and often some interview practice that isn't present at state school. You're actually receiving all of these benefits, so saying that you went to a state school before is fairly moot. That's like saying you had inferior nappies as a baby, really the only thing that matters is what affects your application, in which case you're now in a 'privileged' environment, so to speak. Having previously not been at private school doesn't, I assume, mean that your teachers have therefore continued to treat you like a state school pupil. You've got the same leg up as everybody else at private school at this point.

The only influence that state vs private has is to do with these things out of your control that can cause you to under-represent your actual abilities either academically or at interview. It's not meant to be positive discrimination, it's meant to be a kind of considered compensation. The fact you're on a bursary is irrelevant. What do you want - for the selection panel to shed a tear for you? Unless being on a bursary is somehow causing you to continue to be academically under-privileged, which sounds slightly mad to me, it's not relevant to anybody except for student finance.

Where you did your GCSEs etc. should show up on your application.
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Paralove
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The only time your school is given consideration for offers is usually in terms of its performance and the area - some unis give contextual offers (lower ones but usually only by a grade) to such applicants; I received one from Bristol on this basis though for languages.

Honestly, if you have the grades/PS/good interview you should get in regardless of school. As the above poster said, most things are speculation.
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medactuary
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Thank you - that does make sense. Just to be clear - I don't want sympathy but to know whether it makes a difference
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Paralove
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(Original post by medactuary)
Thank you - that does make sense. Just to be clear - I don't want sympathy but to know whether it makes a difference
A lot of places do consider your achievements in context with where you achieved them but it is a very small part of the process. There are as many who go to good schools as poor ones.

As you're looking as medicine I would say that they are probably less likely to distinguish because its such a hard one to get into so are unlikely to do contextual offers for it. But then idk, you will have to check uni sites for that one! But it would make sense in my eyes to not be as flexible with medicine as other subjects.
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nexttime
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(Original post by medactuary)
Thank you - that does make sense. Just to be clear - I don't want sympathy but to know whether it makes a difference
The advantage you have from getting a better education outweighs any disadvantage incurred.
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medactuary
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Now having discussed it I see little reason why they would provide an exception in this case (especially for medicine)
Thank you for your prompt relies - it's really helped 👍
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