meems5
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I'm a year 12 student studying bio, chem, maths and economics and I really want to be a teacher, just not sure which subject. I'm equally good at and enjoy both maths and chem. I'm also a personal tutor for so I'd even like to start up my own tuition firm once I have the relevant qualifications, it's just a matter of how do I do it?
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lolface32
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(Original post by meems5)
I'm a year 12 student studying bio, chem, maths and economics and I really want to be a teacher, just not sure which subject. I'm equally good at and enjoy both maths and chem. I'm also a personal tutor for so I'd even like to start up my own tuition firm once I have the relevant qualifications, it's just a matter of how do I do it?
Chemistry with Maths degree?
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Greating
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1) Don't plan your life away too soon. It's good to have an idea of where you want to go and what you want to be, but life changes a hell of a lot, so still be fluid in your ability to make decisions. Good on you for wanting to become a teacher, though!
2) If you want to become a teacher, you're going to need a lot of passion about your subjects. Every teacher I've ever spoken to owes enjoying teaching to the fact that they have always loved their subject throughout school.
3) Don't worry about this or that specific subject at this point. Have an open mind. Go to each lesson and think: "Could I see myself doing this for 30 years?", "do I understand this material enough to explain the concepts to a friend?"

Just enjoy the next few months and explore both of the options. Just go with the flow - the right decision will come to you eventually!
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Little Wing
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Do an Engineering degree and get a job. Unless you want to teach?
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Noble.
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(Original post by Little Wing)
Do an Engineering degree and get a job. Unless you want to teach?
Or... do one of the degrees she's already mentioned and get a job?

I don't know whether you poorly worded that, or whether you're under the impression everyone with a maths or chemistry degree goes into teaching.
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meems5
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I considered Chemical Engineering, but I definitely want to teach
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meems5
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(Original post by Greating)
1) Don't plan your life away too soon. It's good to have an idea of where you want to go and what you want to be, but life changes a hell of a lot, so still be fluid in your ability to make decisions. Good on you for wanting to become a teacher, though!
2) If you want to become a teacher, you're going to need a lot of passion about your subjects. Every teacher I've ever spoken to owes enjoying teaching to the fact that they have always loved their subject throughout school.
3) Don't worry about this or that specific subject at this point. Have an open mind. Go to each lesson and think: "Could I see myself doing this for 30 years?", "do I understand this material enough to explain the concepts to a friend?"

Just enjoy the next few months and explore both of the options. Just go with the flow - the right decision will come to you eventually!
thanks for the great advice!
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davros
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(Original post by meems5)
I'm a year 12 student studying bio, chem, maths and economics and I really want to be a teacher, just not sure which subject. I'm equally good at and enjoy both maths and chem. I'm also a personal tutor for so I'd even like to start up my own tuition firm once I have the relevant qualifications, it's just a matter of how do I do it?
You've had some good advice already, so I won't duplicate that!

One thing I would say is this: if you're giving serious consideration to a Maths degree, then you really should be taking Further Maths at A Level.

It's not absolutely essential, but:
if you don't have it (at AS level at the least), you may be disadvantaged or ruled out of certain courses at top unis (depending on your ambitions of course)
students who have gone on to maths degree courses without taking FM have often commented that they regret not taking it.

Taking a Maths degree is not something to be taken lightly because of the jump from A level - it tends to appeal to people who have a real passion for the subject and willingly take on extra work such as FM to test their skills.

Don't let me put you off, because there is a wide range of degrees in the subject, but make sure you give careful consideration to what you would be most happy doing
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Munrot07
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(Original post by meems5)
I'm a year 12 student studying bio, chem, maths and economics and I really want to be a teacher, just not sure which subject. I'm equally good at and enjoy both maths and chem. I'm also a personal tutor for so I'd even like to start up my own tuition firm once I have the relevant qualifications, it's just a matter of how do I do it?
Two big questions: which do you prefer and which can you explain better.

I also want to become a teacher, though in biology. (I'm in A2 doing bio, chem and maths). Now from my AS grades i'm better at Maths (by 1 mark) but I'd find it hard to explain maths where not only do i love biology and could spend my life doing it, i'm also good at explaining it and teaching it (from what others have told me).
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meems5
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(Original post by davros)
You've had some good advice already, so I won't duplicate that!

One thing I would say is this: if you're giving serious consideration to a Maths degree, then you really should be taking Further Maths at A Level.

It's not absolutely essential, but:
if you don't have it (at AS level at the least), you may be disadvantaged or ruled out of certain courses at top unis (depending on your ambitions of course)
students who have gone on to maths degree courses without taking FM have often commented that they regret not taking it.

Taking a Maths degree is not something to be taken lightly because of the jump from A level - it tends to appeal to people who have a real passion for the subject and willingly take on extra work such as FM to test their skills.

Don't let me put you off, because there is a wide range of degrees in the subject, but make sure you give careful consideration to what you would be most happy doing
At the time of selecting my A-Level subjects, I had no idea I would even consider studying Maths at degree level so I thought I'd choose Economics as opposed to FM even though I regret it now. I originally wanted to study Medicine, but I fainted on my first day of work exp so I guess that's a total no no
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meems5
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(Original post by Munrot07)
Two big questions: which do you prefer and which can you explain better.

I also want to become a teacher, though in biology. (I'm in A2 doing bio, chem and maths). Now from my AS grades i'm better at Maths (by 1 mark) but I'd find it hard to explain maths where not only do i love biology and could spend my life doing it, i'm also good at explaining it and teaching it (from what others have told me).
I find that I can explain both Chemistry and Maths well, especially since I tutor Maths and Science to GCSE students and I'm always helping my classmates out. Biology is a no no for me, I can't wait to drop it at the end of this year! Good luck with what you're doing, though
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Little Wing
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(Original post by Noble.)
Or... do one of the degrees she's already mentioned and get a job?

I don't know whether you poorly worded that, or whether you're under the impression everyone with a maths or chemistry degree goes into teaching.
Sorry, that was poorly worded. What I meant to say was that, if you do a maths/chem degree you will most likely end up in teaching (which is a great career), do yourself a favour and do an Engineering degree (you can still be a teacher but it opens you up to way more options).
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Noble.
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(Original post by Little Wing)
Sorry, that was poorly worded. What I meant to say was that, if you do a maths/chem degree you will most likely end up in teaching (which is a great career), do yourself a favour and do an Engineering degree (you can still be a teacher but it opens you up to way more options).
Not really. It's also a very silly idea to study engineering for 4-years if you have little interest in becoming an engineer.
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Grace_14
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NO WAY! I'm doing a Chemistry and Maths degree next year! (provided I get my offer grades - gulp)
Do a joint honours if you like them both that much (yay me too!); Leeds, Southampton and Durham all offer a variant.
Durham is NatSci - which is where you pick at least two sciences to study (and you can pick chem & maths) - entry req. A*AA
Southampton is Chemistry with Maths (mostly chemistry course with lots of maths thrown in) - entry req AAB
Leeds is Chemistry and Maths (half and half) and the entry req are AAB.

(Durham gave me a no thanks, but I have offers from the other two and both courses are SOOOOO GOOD!!)

But obviously, do what you want to do, and good luck! Hope it all works out
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L'Evil Fish
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This is why I want to get into Cambridge for NatSci :moon:

Maths, Chemistry and Physics :coma:
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davros
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(Original post by Noble.)
It's also a very silly idea to study engineering for 4-years if you have little interest in becoming an engineer.
Not if you're Carol Vorderman
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Noble.
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(Original post by davros)
Not if you're Carol Vorderman
Haha, I imagine getting a third three years is a row doing an engineering degree dampens an enthusiasm for becoming an engineer.
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username638250
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(Original post by Little Wing)
Sorry, that was poorly worded. What I meant to say was that, if you do a maths/chem degree you will most likely end up in teaching (which is a great career), do yourself a favour and do an Engineering degree (you can still be a teacher but it opens you up to way more options).
Isn't IB or going into Big 4 most popular with Maths grads? Idk for Chem. Obviously depends on the university.

Maths and Chem have plenty of doors open and Engineering won't open many more.
@OP, have you considered NatSci? You can also do joint honours with Chem and Maths or Chem with Maths and vice versa. I know that UCL and Southampton do.

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