Business management or law degree (best answer to anyone who does not give a silly an Watch

asdfghjkl12
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Relating to what degree I should do in any London University, which is a better course and why + what careers can you do with each degree. I'm at alevels
Philosophy
Sociology
Media
Business
Help?!!!?! I really wish I knew, it's making me think all the time which I should do? #stresssed #help
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CEKTOP
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(Original post by asdfghjkl12)

Relating to what degree I should do in any London University, which is a better course and why + what careers can you do with each degree. I'm at alevels
Philosophy
Sociology
Media
Business
Help?!!!?! I really wish I knew, it's making me think all the time which I should do? #stresssed #help
Any course titled "Business Management" is a bad one, that's pretty much a rule of thumb. There is also an oversupply of lawyers in the UK. Philosophy is your only more or less solid A level.

Taking the three factors outlined above into account I suggest you embrace reality and do an apprenticeship.
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TicketyBox
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(Original post by CEKTOP)
Any course titled "Business Management" is a bad one, that's pretty much a rule of thumb. There is also an oversupply of lawyers in the UK. Philosophy is your only more or less solid A level.

Taking the three factors outlined above into account I suggest you embrace reality and do an apprenticeship.
Do you know anything about Business Management? It's one of the most flexible degrees you can have which is useful in many sectors. Finance, retail, marketing, human resources. If you took a couple of minutes to read up on graduate programmes or management schemes, you'd know how this.

Though I agree, there is an oversupply of lawyers in the UK. It's more difficult to set yourself apart if you don't have a first and a ton of ambition. Not to mention that as a profession it would be pretty demanding, but if you look at the stats law graduates pay increases much quicker than business grads after the first few years despite on average having similar starting salaries. (Mostly because lawyers fresh from University aren't of much use to law firms, but pay will increase incrementally with experience and usefulness.)

I don't know why you think Philosophy is a 'solid' A-level. It's an arts subject, and I can't think of any graduate market catering to arts students at the moment. If you enjoy Philosophy it'll be fun to study at Uni, but you have to think about long term job prospects. Unless you're considering teaching it or working academically in Philosophy, you'll end up in an entry level position or chasing the same graduate positions as the Business grads. (So why not just study Business?)
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CEKTOP
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(Original post by TicketyBox)
Do you know anything about Business Management? It's one of the most flexible degrees you can have which is useful in many sectors. Finance, retail, marketing, human resources. If you took a couple of minutes to read up on graduate programmes or management schemes, you'd know how this.

Though I agree, there is an oversupply of lawyers in the UK. It's more difficult to set yourself apart if you don't have a first and a ton of ambition. Not to mention that as a profession it would be pretty demanding, but if you look at the stats law graduates pay increases much quicker than business grads after the first few years despite on average having similar starting salaries. (Mostly because lawyers fresh from University aren't of much use to law firms, but pay will increase incrementally with experience and usefulness.)

I don't know why you think Philosophy is a 'solid' A-level. It's an arts subject, and I can't think of any graduate market catering to arts students at the moment. If you enjoy Philosophy it'll be fun to study at Uni, but you have to think about long term job prospects. Unless you're considering teaching it or working academically in Philosophy, you'll end up in an entry level position or chasing the same graduate positions as the Business grads. (So why not just study Business?)
Philosophy is a solid A-level because it is more or less demanding, unlike Sociology or Business Studies.
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tengentoppa
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(Original post by CEKTOP)
Any course titled "Business Management" is a bad one, that's pretty much a rule of thumb. There is also an oversupply of lawyers in the UK. Philosophy is your only more or less solid A level.

Taking the three factors outlined above into account I suggest you embrace reality and do an apprenticeship.
(Original post by TicketyBox)

Though I agree, there is an oversupply of lawyers in the UK. It's more difficult to set yourself apart if you don't have a first and a ton of ambition. Not to mention that as a profession it would be pretty demanding, but if you look at the stats law graduates pay increases much quicker than business grads after the first few years despite on average having similar starting salaries. (Mostly because lawyers fresh from University aren't of much use to law firms, but pay will increase incrementally with experience and usefulness.)
OP wants to study at a London university. A 2:1 from UCL, LSE or KCL is fine for a training contact (provided other aspects of your CV are sound). Even if OP doesn't want to become a lawyer, Law grads from top institutions are well looked upon.

I always thought Business Management was a poor man's Economics, but I suppose any degree from a top uni is fine.
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David Leach
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Business Management degrees can lead to some outstanding opportunities - particularly if you couple with a specialism where there is a shortage of talent. Business with Supply Chain Management at Huddersfield is backed by leading companies through the NOVUS scheme who, in addition to working with you during the course, even guarantee work experience and a graduate job. Why? Because not enough student graduate with the right skills to meet demand in this area. Backers include M&S, ASOS, Dixons, Sainsbury's, DHL, Wincanton Premier Foods and Network Rail
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