BF13
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I have an unconditional offer for 2014-2015. It's not for economics, finance, law, or any of the more traditionally competitive programs at LSE. I would be paying international fees, and I've heard that LSE tends to be a cash cow when it comes to international students, so I want to make sure that I'm not wasting my time or money doing a one year program that may not lead to high employment prospects after graduation.

Do you think LSE is worth the investment? :confused::confused::confused:
Is there a high level of support when it comes to finding post-graduation employment? Do recruiters -- IB, consulting -- provide equal opportunities to non-economics/finance students? How supportive and accessible are the professors? Research opportunities?

(I know some people may argue that the LSE brand is prestigious and therefore worth the price, but I'm not looking to purchase a name brand degree; I'm looking for a solid postgraduate education and career advancement.)
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El Salvador
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It depends on what you want to do afterwards.
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sj27
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(Original post by BF13)
I have an unconditional offer for 2014-2015. It's not for economics, finance, law, or any of the more traditionally competitive programs at LSE. I would be paying international fees, and I've heard that LSE tends to be a cash cow when it comes to international students, so I want to make sure that I'm not wasting my time or money doing a one year program that may not lead to high employment prospects after graduation.

Do you think LSE is worth the investment? :confused::confused::confused:
Is there a high level of support when it comes to finding post-graduation employment? Do recruiters -- IB, consulting -- provide equal opportunities to non-economics/finance students? How supportive and accessible are the professors? Research opportunities?

(I know some people may argue that the LSE brand is prestigious and therefore worth the price, but I'm not looking to purchase a name brand degree; I'm looking for a solid postgraduate education and career advancement.)
It's a bit difficult to answer as you've only told us what subjects you're not doing, not which one you actually are. May be someone here who is on the course you're thinking of, for example.

As for jobs, general consensus is that it is now very difficult for internationals to stay in the UK after graduating so if getting a job there is part of your motivation, you may have to rethink that part of it. Related to that, the brand name of LSE in your home country will actually be important then.
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BF13
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(Original post by sj27)
It's a bit difficult to answer as you've only told us what subjects you're not doing, not which one you actually are. May be someone here who is on the course you're thinking of, for example.

As for jobs, general consensus is that it is now very difficult for internationals to stay in the UK after graduating so if getting a job there is part of your motivation, you may have to rethink that part of it. Related to that, the brand name of LSE in your home country will actually be important then.
Apologies for the lack of detail. I have an offer for International Health Policy. I would prefer to stay in the UK/Europe for work but would be fine with returning to the US. In terms of the brand name, I have an undergraduate degree from an Ivy League university, so that most likely carries more weight than the LSE name in my home country and globally. That's why prestige/name isn't one of the key factors for me.

In terms of what I want to do afterwards: management consulting, health policy, or PhD.
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sj27
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Ok, that makes things clearer. Personally don't know about that degree but hopefully someone who does can chime in. (If it helps, it certainly doesn't sound like one of the ...vaguer degrees that are the ones usually notorious for being cash cows.)

Something I usually suggest for people wondering about career prospects is to do a search on LinkedIn using the uni/degree name as the keywords - it will mean a bit of trawling through profiles, but you should get a reasonable idea of where graduates have ended up.
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Tcannon
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Health Policy opens some paths to lucrative careers. Would you fund it with federal loans plus private, scholarship or do you have independent funds? Based on ROI of post MSc salary:

Management Consulting: Yes, worth investment. High salary would help you pay off loans.
Health Policy: No for non -profits, maybe for think tanks with regards to salary and career progression
PhD: No, do not go into massive debt for MSc and enter a 5 year PhD programme with uncertain job prospects. Over at US Gradcafe forum, most posters say 'avoid debt for PhD'. LSE does not give you the boost given your Ivy ed and better known US health Policy schools (JHU, Michigan, WWS, Sipa).

By the way, LSE also milks home students for its MA/MSc. Interestingly, LSE does not offer the best MSc Health Policy in the UK.
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redferry
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(Original post by BF13)
I have an unconditional offer for 2014-2015. It's not for economics, finance, law, or any of the more traditionally competitive programs at LSE. I would be paying international fees, and I've heard that LSE tends to be a cash cow when it comes to international students, so I want to make sure that I'm not wasting my time or money doing a one year program that may not lead to high employment prospects after graduation.

Do you think LSE is worth the investment? :confused::confused::confused:
Is there a high level of support when it comes to finding post-graduation employment? Do recruiters -- IB, consulting -- provide equal opportunities to non-economics/finance students? How supportive and accessible are the professors? Research opportunities?

(I know some people may argue that the LSE brand is prestigious and therefore worth the price, but I'm not looking to purchase a name brand degree; I'm looking for a solid postgraduate education and career advancement.)
If it helps LSE charges home students the same as internationals for postgraduate courses.
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AcquaLife
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(Original post by sj27)

As for jobs, general consensus is that it is now very difficult for internationals to stay in the UK after graduating so if getting a job there is part of your motivation, you may have to rethink that part of it. Related to that, the brand name of LSE in your home country will actually be important then.
Can you not apply for a Tier 2 visa to stay in the UK after graduation? I know to get a Tier 2 visa you have to have a sponsor (I am guessing a job offer by an approved institution or company). I read on the visa government website you can switch your Tier 4 visa, to a Tier 2 visa if you have sponsorship and pay the premium price, in one day.
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dawgnut
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Paying international fee just for a LSE brand name is not worth the money, LSE master program is worth the money if you are the kind of the person who takes advantage of every campus event they host at the LSE campus through out the year.

Ultimately, graduate prospect wise, really depends on individual characters, a postgrade at LSE will not get you a job alone.

Good luck

fyi, the career support at any UK unis are awful
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sj27
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(Original post by AcquaLife)
Can you not apply for a Tier 2 visa to stay in the UK after graduation? I know to get a Tier 2 visa you have to have a sponsor (I am guessing a job offer by an approved institution or company). I read on the visa government website you can switch your Tier 4 visa, to a Tier 2 visa if you have sponsorship and pay the premium price, in one day.
That's assuming you'll find a company willing to go through the trouble of doing that. One might of course, but particularly if you are talking about fresh graduates, companies will have plenty of UK/EU ones to choose from without that hassle. Not saying it's impossible and I'm sure it happens - but there are plenty of reports, including on TSR, of internationals who find it very dificult to find someone prepared to sponsor them. Obviously if the person has some work experience or some other attribute to give them an edge over other applicants, chances of finding a sponsor would be better.
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wakeypuzziegirl
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(Original post by BF13)
I have an unconditional offer for 2014-2015. It's not for economics, finance, law, or any of the more traditionally competitive programs at LSE. I would be paying international, and I've heard that LSE tends to be a cash cow when it comes to international students, so I want to make sure that I'm not wasting my time or money doing a one year program that may not lead to high employment prospects after graduation.

Do you think LSE is worth the investment? :confused::confused::confused:
Is there a high level of support when it comes to finding post-graduation employment? Do recruiters -- IB, consulting -- provide equal opportunities to non-economics/finance students? How supportive and accessible are the professors? Research opportunities?

(I know some people may argue that the LSE brand is prestigious and therefore worth the price, but I'm not looking to purchase a name brand degree; I'm looking for a solid postgraduate education and career advancement.)



I don't have much input, but I'm currently facing the same situation as you are. I also want to work in the field of global health and policy/consulting. I now have to make the difficult decision between LSE and UCL. LSE certainly has the brand name globally, though both universities are prestigious. However, UCL has an actual Institute for Global Health which makes me think the programme is more developed.

Like you, I do intend to stay in the UK/EU after masters, but I also have EU citizenship which means I don't have to worry abt acquiring a visa. Nevertheless, if you goal is to work for NGOs or the UN/WHO in the field of development and health policy, I think Europe is more established than the US.

Anyway, good luck with your decision. PM me if you are by chance also having to pick between LSE and UCL.
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sj27
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(Original post by AcquaLife)
Can you not apply for a Tier 2 visa to stay in the UK after graduation? I know to get a Tier 2 visa you have to have a sponsor (I am guessing a job offer by an approved institution or company). I read on the visa government website you can switch your Tier 4 visa, to a Tier 2 visa if you have sponsorship and pay the premium price, in one day.
FYI, this article focuses on Indian grads but I imagine it's the same for any internationals - they interview a Cambridge masters graduate who could not find anyone willing to sponsor him http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/422366.article - even when he interviewed at companies who already had sponsor licences.

There are also a couple of threads somewhere in the postgrad forum of people sharing experiences trying to find jobs after graduating.
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AcquaLife
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(Original post by sj27)
That's assuming you'll find a company willing to go through the trouble of doing that. One might of course, but particularly if you are talking about fresh graduates, companies will have plenty of UK/EU ones to choose from without that hassle. Not saying it's impossible and I'm sure it happens - but there are plenty of reports, including on TSR, of internationals who find it very dificult to find someone prepared to sponsor them. Obviously if the person has some work experience or some other attribute to give them an edge over other applicants, chances of finding a sponsor would be better.
How much of a hassle is it to sponsor someone? Do you think a University would be more likely to sponsor someone opposed to a company?
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sj27
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(Original post by AcquaLife)
How much of a hassle is it to sponsor someone? Do you think a University would be more likely to sponsor someone opposed to a company?
I have no idea. But if getting a job in the UK is a primary motivation for doing a degree in the UK, I think it's a risky bet.
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Bill_Gates
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Talking from someone who knows many LSE post grads. It is a cash cow and i HIGHLY recommended you do it somewhere more reasonably priced.

I feel sorry for LSE post grads getting suckered into those high fees with little pay back.
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Tcannon
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Lot of hassle. My sister's employer used to sponsor selected non EU grads. Basically, the sponsor needs to prove to Department of Education affiliated agency in Sheffield that you are more qualified for job descriptions than other UK and EU applicants. There is a procedure: Sponsor advertises position, explains in statement back and forth to officer, firm needs to show full paperwork and often needs to employ expert lawyer. It took 3-4 months at least to get visa and costs firm a few thousand £. The current home office also imposed a quota for various visa types.

This puts off small firms to sponsor non EU people as it takes lots of resources. In the current economic slump, even mid tier firms scaled down hiring.

Some firms still go for it, see finance and consulting.
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dawgnut
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(Original post by AcquaLife)
How much of a hassle is it to sponsor someone? Do you think a University would be more likely to sponsor someone opposed to a company?
There are basically two options for you if you go end up at LSE.

1) Get sponsor by a company, think consultancy firm, investment banks or most likely (easist to get in) big 4 accountancy firms.

2) Continue PhD with funding, get in a PhD programme after Master, apply for government PhD funding, which will give you 3-5 years worth of funding enough for you to pay your PhD fees + living + accommodation, and give you enough time to find a job afterwards
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BF13
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Thank you everyone for the feedback. It is much appreciated. I have some more thinking to do, but I think the costs most likely outweigh the benefits in my case, given the difficult economy and visa issues. I already have a great job in the US, and I don't feel secure enough in the post-LSE employment prospects (based on the program's site, LinkedIn -- thanks sj27!, the posts on TSR) to take the gamble. I'm probably better off applying to consulting or policy jobs directly, but LSE does have many positive attributes that drew me there in the first place, so it's still a tough decision!
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sj27
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(Original post by Bill_Gates)
Talking from someone who knows many LSE post grads. It is a cash cow and i HIGHLY recommended you do it somewhere more reasonably priced.

I feel sorry for LSE post grads getting suckered into those high fees with little pay back.
I know lots of LSE postgrad graduates too. I've met them all through work, where they have good jobs. So I see your anecdotal evidence and raise you one.

Admittedly the ones I've met all have either economics or finance degrees though.
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acrbag
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Sorry to hijack this thread, but my question is similar I promise!

I have an offer for Msc Media & Comm, and am weighing the pros-and-cons. My main question is how are the job prospects for British citizens? I read stories about people not getting jobs, but I know LSE is a hub for international students and the visa sponsorship can be a pain! (I went through it in the USA). So I don't know if these people are mainly international students, or I'm sure a combination of both.

A slightly similar question, also as mentioned in the main post, is it possible to gain employment in other "fields" with a LSE Msc ? IE Consulting and/or possibly finance.

In the US its definitely doable, I had an offer from a top NYC bank with a completely unrelated degree. I know the UK recruiting game is a little different. Forgive me, I have lived in the US since 18 years old and don't know the UK process!

I don't need my hand held through the interview process, but it would be nice if LSE opened doors to previously unattainable interviews!

Cheers!
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