study help for my A levels

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hasan6091
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#1
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#1
Hi for my A levels i am taking Maths and all 3 sciences. i was just wondering if anyone has any tips to help me get A/A* grades in at least maths, physics and chemistry. also do you have any tips on how to revise and how to make my revision active and efficient. i already do past papers and make notes but i feel like i am not making the most of my time. My school recommends i fit in 4 hours for each subject every week outside of school, so that is 20 hours of revision. i would be grateful for some advice.

Thanks
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Mini-Me
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#2
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#2
I'm doing pretty much that, and I'm in my A2 year now.
To revise science I did all the past papers possible, in the time immediately leading up to the exams. I also created flash cards that I would use when walking to/from school to remember key words and specific cycles, such as the process of removal of CO2 in blood.
My first part of revision was to create posters, one for each double page spread in the textbook, and I stuck them all up in my room.
I feel that my most beneficial revision was to print off copies of the spec and to write out detailed notes with coloured key words and diagrams, ensuring every aspect of the spec was covered.
Other people would do all the questions in textbooks and revision guides.

For maths I just did all the past papers. I did maths and further maths, did about 15 past papers for each exam, so last year did 90 past papers. This may seem like a lot, but it was very worth it. You can also go through and do questions from the textbooks, as well as write notes on specific methods of working out answers, this is particularly helpful if you do decision maths, to help you learn the algorithms.
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hasan6091
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Mini-Me)
I'm doing pretty much that, and I'm in my A2 year now.
To revise science I did all the past papers possible, in the time immediately leading up to the exams. I also created flash cards that I would use when walking to/from school to remember key words and specific cycles, such as the process of removal of CO2 in blood.
My first part of revision was to create posters, one for each double page spread in the textbook, and I stuck them all up in my room.
I feel that my most beneficial revision was to print off copies of the spec and to write out detailed notes with coloured key words and diagrams, ensuring every aspect of the spec was covered.
Other people would do all the questions in textbooks and revision guides.

For maths I just did all the past papers. I did maths and further maths, did about 15 past papers for each exam, so last year did 90 past papers. This may seem like a lot, but it was very worth it. You can also go through and do questions from the textbooks, as well as write notes on specific methods of working out answers, this is particularly helpful if you do decision maths, to help you learn the algorithms.
Hey Thanks, for maths yeh I think past papers are very vital in order to achieve a high grade, because I can now predict the order of questions in C1 and I know what they expect you to do. D1 I think it Is the easiest maths that anyone can study but it does get tricky with the network algorithms. I think revising science is the main issue because there is always that element of surprise where they can ask you to apply knowledge to anything. I did start with flash cards but have not got round to finishing them which I probably should. but what should I do once I have made all these fancy cards how could I utilise them properly? the CO2 cycle is one of the more tricky concepts along with haemoglobin in our module. btw do you have any idea of what you want to study at uni .

thanks I am sure your tips will come to use
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Mini-Me
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#4
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#4
(Original post by hasan6091)
Hey Thanks, for maths yeh I think past papers are very vital in order to achieve a high grade, because I can now predict the order of questions in C1 and I know what they expect you to do. D1 I think it Is the easiest maths that anyone can study but it does get tricky with the network algorithms. I think revising science is the main issue because there is always that element of surprise where they can ask you to apply knowledge to anything. I did start with flash cards but have not got round to finishing them which I probably should. but what should I do once I have made all these fancy cards how could I utilise them properly? the CO2 cycle is one of the more tricky concepts along with haemoglobin in our module. btw do you have any idea of what you want to study at uni .

thanks I am sure your tips will come to use
No worries for the advice, as I said you're in a similar situation to me.
For flash cards, I just made them and then used them walking to/from school, as I have a 30min walk each way. I would read over one again and again until I memorised it, and was able to recall it by memory. I would then do the same for a second one, then once I'd learnt it, recall both of them. I would continue it for about 8 flashcards each day, rotating flash cards.
That's my method for remembering anything, be it key words, processes or spanish controlled assessments for GCSE, and it works for me.
With D1 I just did past papers and rewrote out the algorithms I'd been given, with coloured pens (I like coloured pens ) I think I just found it quite easy to remember them so didn't have to try to hard, but I guess practice makes perfect.

I've applied to study Biochemistry, but am slightly taking back my choice and might try to transfer to Biomedical science or chemistry. Do you know what you want to do?
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hasan6091
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Mini-Me)
No worries for the advice, as I said you're in a similar situation to me.
For flash cards, I just made them and then used them walking to/from school, as I have a 30min walk each way. I would read over one again and again until I memorised it, and was able to recall it by memory. I would then do the same for a second one, then once I'd learnt it, recall both of them. I would continue it for about 8 flashcards each day, rotating flash cards.
That's my method for remembering anything, be it key words, processes or spanish controlled assessments for GCSE, and it works for me.
With D1 I just did past papers and rewrote out the algorithms I'd been given, with coloured pens (I like coloured pens ) I think I just found it quite easy to remember them so didn't have to try to hard, but I guess practice makes perfect.


I've applied to study Biochemistry, but am slightly taking back my choice and might try to transfer to Biomedical science or chemistry. Do you know what you want to do?
yep practice makes perfect, and i have no idea . im looking in to physics , engineering, and medicine. i don't have a lot of time and really need to pick something
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alow
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#6
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#6
I did the same subjects and got A*s in physics, chem and maths and an A in bio.

What I did was use all of the past papers and markschemes including from the older specifications, as these tend to be a fair bit harder. I would also read introductory undergrad textbooks for the sections of the A Level specifications where I found that I didn't understand the concepts fully because they didn't put in enough depth.
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hasan6091
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#7
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#7
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Hmm using ubdergrad books sounds like a good idea. So what are you studying now and well done on your awesome grades
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alow
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#8
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#8
(Original post by hasan6091)
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Hmm using ubdergrad books sounds like a good idea. So what are you studying now and well done on your awesome grades
It definitely helped me understand the topics better which was good for the A* questions.

I'm on my gap year right now, taking Further Maths this June. Provided I get an A then I'll start Phys NatSci at Cambridge in October
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hasan6091
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#9
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#9
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Hmm what can you do with a degree in that and good look
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