moonwalker
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Ok, for the love of god I cannot understand why we weren't taught grammar, but there you go. Exam is in a few months and I'm having serious issues with grammar. I don't know half of it! Any tips? Or a checklist of what I should know? And see the translation from English to French? I AM ABSOLUTELY SCREWED. If you see a homeless person in a bin muttering French to themselves sometime next year, it will most likely be me.
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qwertyuiop1993
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(Original post by moonwalker)
Ok, for the love of god I cannot understand why we weren't taught grammar, but there you go. Exam is in a few months and I'm having serious issues with grammar. I don't know half of it! Any tips? Or a checklist of what I should know? And see the translation from English to French? I AM ABSOLUTELY SCREWED. If you see a homeless person in a bin muttering French to themselves sometime next year, it will most likely be me.
Do you have any particular grammar points you don't understand?
In my sig there's a link to some grammar notes which you might find useful.

Also, I'd recommend you do this test: http://french.about.com/library/week...oficiency3.htm
After you answer all the questions it will give you your score and direct you to a specific grammar article for each of the questions you got wrong.
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Anna Schoon
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(Original post by moonwalker)
Ok, for the love of god I cannot understand why we weren't taught grammar, but there you go. Exam is in a few months and I'm having serious issues with grammar. I don't know half of it! Any tips? Or a checklist of what I should know? And see the translation from English to French? I AM ABSOLUTELY SCREWED. If you see a homeless person in a bin muttering French to themselves sometime next year, it will most likely be me.
Good idea from Qwertyuiop (previous post) to find out where your weak spots are.

As a teacher, I would say always concentrate on the verbs first - that's over half the grammar you need. So:
- learn your conjugations if you don't know them yet. You need the following tenses and moods: present, imperfect, future, conditional, subjunctive, passé composé, pluperfect, future perfect, conditional perfect, perfect subjunctive.
- learn when to use these! Particularly tricky: tenses with depuis and venir de; the "hidden future"; tenses in reported speech; si-clauses; use of the subjunctive; use of the passive voice.
- related to verbs is the agreement of past participles, and particularly the preceding direct object rule.
- Once you've sorted out your verbs, you're ready to tackle the next things depending on your own strengths and weaknesses. Important aspects of grammar are: position and agreement of adjectives; use of pronouns (like y and en, but also the difference between lui, le/la and so on) and their position in a sentence; use of relative pronouns (qui, que, dont, etc.).

Grammar is a bit of a hobby-horse of mine. I always find that once students get to grips with the grammar they suddenly make huge leaps of progress, so it's well worth a bit of extra effort. It will really pay dividends. For what it's worth, the book I work with is Essential French Grammar for the Sixth Form and Beyond - particularly useful for students revising mainly on their own. You'll find it here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/French-Gramm.../dp/095706120X

Good luck! Remember to re-post with any specific questions that you may have after you've done the test and looked at the notes.
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FH1
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Hey! All the grammar that you need to know should be included in your textbooks (look at both AS/A2 if you are struggling)...

I personally made a file dedicated just to grammar as it is quite difficult - in it I explain the different tenses and each tense has a revision card to test me on it's rules e.g. verb endings. If you do this and memorise them, tenses should be much easier! You also have to learn the main irregular verbs by memorising and trying to use them as much as possible in the work you do. Sometimes to test myself on verbs in particular, I use one verb and write it in as many tenses as possible - where you get stuck is obviously where you need help (it's a good way to identify strengths and weaknesses).

For other grammer such as que/qui/dont/lequel etc you have to learn the rule as well as how it can be applied. I find that continuously putting these in examples helps the most. It might also help if you make sentences for different grammer rules for each topic in the exam so that you can memorise them if you are struggling.

The sooner you get to grips with grammar, the sooner you will love it!
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M.N.F
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I recommend the French Grammar your guide (from the Malvern Language Guides series) and Folens' verbs book. Bon chance!
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