30,000-year-old giant virus 'comes back to life' Watch

ProPlus
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-26387276

Fascinating, Do you reckon awakening old viruses is a unwise move or a good move?
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tonberry
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****ing hell haven't these guys seen The Thing?!
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joey11223
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(Original post by tonberry)
****ing hell haven't these guys seen The Thing?!
My sentiments exactly!

Giant viruses which survive 30k years in ice?

ALIENS, FLESH EATING MUTATING ALIENS! KILL IT WITH FIRE!
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Simplythebest...
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give it to Obama and see how he uses it.
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tonberry
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(Original post by joey11223)
My sentiments exactly!

Giant viruses which survive 30k years in ice?

ALIENS, FLESH EATING MUTATING ALIENS! KILL IT WITH FIRE!
Get me a blowtorch and some copper wire
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nocoolusername
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Biologist need to come up with a working vaccine as soon as possible. Stupoid global warmimg.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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username91207
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Doesn't sound wise to me.
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Studentus-anonymous
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Well I know of plenty of people who are effectively little better than an Amoeba but I think we're all safe!
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Mockery
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With the permafrost melting as it is, the thawing of ancient viruses is a distinctly real possibility naturally. These scientists have proven that and therefore brought it to our attention.

The likelihood of any of the viruses being harmful to humans today is very low, given the geographical location and the time frame they just simply would never have specialised to target humans.

People need to stop being so hysterical...
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mojojojo101
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Firstly a virus can't come back to life, it was never alive in the first place.

Secondly it's no threat if kept in a secure facility, like smallpox viruses are. However continued exposure and thawing of permafrost all over the world (not just Siberia) does come with risks which need to be addressed. They won't be, because climate change policy is deeply unpopular, but hey, that's not the point.
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Observatory
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While the BBC makes a big thing of the "climate change will bring back smallpox and kill us all !!" angle, the paper is rather more circumspect:

Attempting to isolate and revive increasingly ancient
amoeba-infecting viruses from permafrost is an inexpensive
and safe way to realistically assess the threat posed by path-
ogenic animal DNA viruses eventually released from soils and
sediments frozen in a distant past.
In other words, they just want some more money to continue their work and dig up some more cool viruses make sure there's no smallpox down there.

The region was sparsely inhabited by humans for only a brief period; it's unlikely there is a dangerous human infection lurking in wait that did not spread outside the region while it was active. The vast majority of viruses, including this one, are not infectious in humans.
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