Hardmetal
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Hello guys.

I have studied level 3 AAT. Im now thinking to start studying ACCA.

Can anyone please give me advice on how acca works such as the exams fees, and study method.

Can you study ACCA at home with just the books and past papers or is it necessary to enrol on the course.

How long does ACCA take to complete?

And is ACCA very difficult?

Anyone who has studied ACCA or is studying please give me some advice.
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Sena5
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Hi there, I'm planning to do ACCA from june too. do a research on acca website. you can ask them on live chat support.

https://acca.whoson.com/chat/chat.as...obal.com&SID=0

www.accaglobal.com/‎
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AW1983
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Can anyone please give me advice on how acca works such as the exams fees, and study method.
I can't recall the exact fees but the poster above has given you the link where you can check it out. I think it's around £100 for the F papers and about £150 for the P papers but I might be a bit off there. Nevertheless, the registration and exam fees with ACCA are relatively cheap.

The course is structured into fourteen exams, nine 'Foundation' papers and five 'Professional.' The first nine are very knowledge based, the last five rely more on application. The list of subjects can be found on the link above but will include basic bookkeeping, Corporate law, Management Accounting, Financial Reporting, Tax, Audit and Corporate Finance. At Professional Level you do three core exams and then choose a further two specialisms (Management Accounting, Tax, Audit and Corporate Finance to choose from).

Can you study ACCA at home with just the books and past papers or is it necessary to enrol on the course.
I wouldn't recommend it. As important as the exams with the ACCA qualification is the work experience and the two really ought to be done together. You need three years of mentored work experience to become a member of ACCA. I've known people to do the exams first but they made life harder than it had to be. ACCA is much more flexible than the ICAEW about who you work with, but you really need a qualified accountant as a mentor.

If you can't immediately start work then you could start the exams although I would recommend taking only one at a time.

When you enrol with ACCA, they don't give you any books by the way. You have to find your own tuition provider and text books. I hear good things about Kaplan and BPP most of the time (in other words I only hear bad things about them when people fail)! I must say the failure rate of people who don't get tutors is rather high and I would recommend you attend a class. If you cannot afford this, it may be worth waiting until you join an employer who can fund it for you.

How long does ACCA take to complete?
2 exams per sitting is recommended, with 2 sittings a year. On that basis, it would take 3.5 years. However, you could speed things a long a little by doing the computer based F1-F3 a little quicker. If you have no tuition, one paper a sitting is realistic and it will take about 7 years. The maximum time you have to complete the exams is 10 years.

And is ACCA very difficult?
Yes and no. It's certainly a challenge and a big one at that. However, it's no harder than many other professional qualifications pitched at the same level. Don't let a qualification being hard put you off anyway, if it wasn't challenging it wouldn't be worth doing.

Anyone who has studied ACCA or is studying please give me some advice.
Just to clarify, I have not done ACCA myself. I'm a chartered secretary. I work with a lot of accountants and have attempted ICAEW papers before making the switch to ICSA.
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economist2
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(Original post by AW1983)
I can't recall the exact fees but the poster above has given you the link where you can check it out. I think it's around £100 for the F papers and about £150 for the P papers but I might be a bit off there. Nevertheless, the registration and exam fees with ACCA are relatively cheap.

The course is structured into fourteen exams, nine 'Foundation' papers and five 'Professional.' The first nine are very knowledge based, the last five rely more on application. The list of subjects can be found on the link above but will include basic bookkeeping, Corporate law, Management Accounting, Financial Reporting, Tax, Audit and Corporate Finance. At Professional Level you do three core exams and then choose a further two specialisms (Management Accounting, Tax, Audit and Corporate Finance to choose from).



I wouldn't recommend it. As important as the exams with the ACCA qualification is the work experience and the two really ought to be done together. You need three years of mentored work experience to become a member of ACCA. I've known people to do the exams first but they made life harder than it had to be. ACCA is much more flexible than the ICAEW about who you work with, but you really need a qualified accountant as a mentor.

If you can't immediately start work then you could start the exams although I would recommend taking only one at a time.

When you enrol with ACCA, they don't give you any books by the way. You have to find your own tuition provider and text books. I hear good things about Kaplan and BPP most of the time (in other words I only hear bad things about them when people fail)! I must say the failure rate of people who don't get tutors is rather high and I would recommend you attend a class. If you cannot afford this, it may be worth waiting until you join an employer who can fund it for you.



2 exams per sitting is recommended, with 2 sittings a year. On that basis, it would take 3.5 years. However, you could speed things a long a little by doing the computer based F1-F3 a little quicker. If you have no tuition, one paper a sitting is realistic and it will take about 7 years. The maximum time you have to complete the exams is 10 years.



Yes and no. It's certainly a challenge and a big one at that. However, it's no harder than many other professional qualifications pitched at the same level. Don't let a qualification being hard put you off anyway, if it wasn't challenging it wouldn't be worth doing.



Just to clarify, I have not done ACCA myself. I'm a chartered secretary. I work with a lot of accountants and have attempted ICAEW papers before making the switch to ICSA.
Hi their.About the ACCA papers.Is their like a final result,like an average of all 14 papers.Or,is it seperate results for each paper?
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alibee
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(Original post by economist2)
Hi their.About the ACCA papers.Is their like a final result,like an average of all 14 papers.Or,is it seperate results for each paper?
If you pass enough papers you pass the qualification. You will get your score for each exam separately as you go along but no-one will be interested in this. You either have the qualification or you don't, it's not classified like a degree.
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AAT Advisor
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Hi there,

Just as some additional information if you were to study level 4 of the AAT accounting qualification you can gain certain exemptions from the first year of chartered accountancy training such as with ACCA or other chartered accountancy training bodies.

For more information on the advanced level AAT diploma please see: http://www.aat.org.uk/qualifications...-qualification

Otherwise just for more information if anyone whose found their way to this thread is looking for steps to get onto chartered accountancy training please feel free to order your free AAT student information pack here: https://www.aat.org.uk/contact-us/in...k/student/form

If you have any questions for AAT please do let us know.

Otherwise good luck in your training.

Natasha
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onteng
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1)just to share. i start acca with 7 exemption paper and 7 to go from 2006. Till now i still left 2 . My mark always at border line to pass (eg. 49,48,47...)

Passing rate is 50%

2) there is some rumors that the harderst is ICAEW, then ACCA and then only CPA. But how far true I am not sure.
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lenolay
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Some thoughts about the difficulty of ACCA and home study.

I wouldn’t say that ACCA is difficult but it’s time consuming. If you have enough time, you can pass the exams easily. However, most of the students are working in full time, so they have limited time to study and prepare for the exams.
The efficiency of home study depends on the paper and your background.

F5: this needs a lot of practice, but there are no difficult or complex areas in the syllabus.
F7: learning a proper method is essential here, so a good provider is recommended
F8: easy if you work in external audit, if not, maybe some guidance will be helpful
F9: again, depends on your background; for people in corporate finance or investment banking this should be easy, otherwise you may need some help
P1: lot of theory, which seems to be ideal for home study, however, experienced tutors can help you to concentrate on the most important (most examined) areas.
(I had exemptions from F1-F4, F6 largely depends on the variant and I didn’t do UK)
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