username1005232
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I appreciate there's a million of these threads on the internet, I still can't resist though.

I have offers from the LSE and UCL for Philosophy & Economics. I know I want to study in London, the only choice now is where.

Just wondering if anyone on here could give some advice about studying either or both economics and philosophy at UCL and LSE. That'd be appreciated.

Thanks
Christian
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benq
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UCL is less career (investment banking/consulting) oriented. You also could say that UCL is more 'fun'. Economics is obviously better at the LSE. Philosophy at UCL is more traditional while the philosophy at LSE is more about sciences/policy making. Both departments are good in their respective specializations. Academically LSE is better in general. Domestically there isn't a huge gap in prestige. However, internationally LSE is a lot more renowned. Hope this helps.
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poohat
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There isnt that much difference between LSE and UCL for economics at departmental/faculty/reserach/etc level, UCL is probably the best econ department in the country behind LSE. For prestige at undergrad level its a bit different though, and probably more like Cambridge > LSE > UCL/Warwick/etc.

LSE being "better academically in general" is nonsense, although its true that LSE has more international reputation.
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ParetoOptimum
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I can comment on the economics side of things, not the philosophy side of things.

I'd ignore what the first response says about economics - judging by his post I'd confidently assume he hasn't really got any connection/knowledge to/of economics at both LSE/UCL.

Both LSE's and UCL's economics courses are extremely similar; both are very quantitative, and you can really focus on the quantitative side if that's your strong point. At UCL I think this results in a (single honours) course that neglects its qualitative side (you could graduate from the single honours course without ever writing an essay), but then again half of my degree is in a qualitative subject (like philosophy) so I'm fine with studying the mathsy/statsy stuff (and I'm better at it too). I expect it's a similar situation at LSE.

UCL is just at career orientated as LSE. With regards to investment banking, it's the same situation. UCL is heavily targeted by the IB's, and the economics department is full of future IB'ers. There's no difference between UCL and LSE in that respect. LSE gets its IB rep from the fact that it is a small specialist institution, and therefore a far greater proportion of its students enter the world of finance. UCL, on the other hand, is a huge multi-faculty with all kinds of students doing all kinds of subjects with different career ambitions, and so a smaller proportion are IB wannabes (I see this as a huge positive in terms of university atmosphere).

Economics department strength-wise: Again very similar. At undergraduate level you can't differentiate them - like I said before, very similar courses, very similar student cohort. At postgraduate level the specialisations become more important. UCL if more renowned for applied microeconomics and econometrics. LSE is more renowned for macroeconomics. This isn't very relevant for undergrad of course.

Brand name-wise: LSE has an edge when it comes to its 'brand power', though this really won't translate into any advantage in the UK job or postgrad market - domestically UCL is also a huge brand name. Internationally, LSE is more well known (though the gap is closing fast), so if you're considering work/postgrad abroad LSE may be the better choice. But as with anything, employment prospects are primarily determined by the individual. Given the similarities of UCL/LSE, brand name doesn't factor in as much here.
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