Today marks the three year anniversary of the Fukushima disaster.

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Puddles the Monkey
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Three years ago today the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami took the lives of over 15 thousand people. Over a quarter of a million people have been displaced from their homes - some will never be able to return due to the radioactive fallout.

The earthquake and following tsunami also caused the meltdown of 3 out of 6 reactors at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

Whilst the plant has somewhat stabilised over the past three years, workers are still facing the problem of how to contain contaminated water and prevent it from leaking in to the surrounding areas and the sea.

Following the disaster Japan shut down all of its nuclear reactors (although it is now looking to re-open them). Germany decided it would shut down its oldest reactors. The downside, of course, is the consequential increase in greenhouse emissions.

Are the risks associated with nuclear power worth the benefits?

がんばれ 日本
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C0balt
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As all of you probably know, there was a catastrophic earthquake and Tsunami on 11th March 2011.
15,884 have passed away
6,148 have been injured
2,633 are still missing and
260,000 people are still forced to live in temporary houses.

If you could offer a silent prayer for a minute or so to those who have passed away, I'm sure they will appreciate it

Kind regards,

A Japanese
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LukeM90
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Terrible tragedy, my heart and thoughts go out to all those who have lost someone or something they care about, I'm sure today is hard for them.

There is a lot that comes from Japan that I love, some of which I consider a big part of my time growing up, and much of which Is still a part of who I am, so I sincerely mean what I just said, I'll give a silent Prayer

All the best,
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WeeGuy
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its been 3 years already, it feels not that long ago.
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C0balt
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Oops - I didn't know this thread existed, and I made another thread on different forums where two people replied..sorry! http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2617732

Well- I still remember the day when I was still in Tokyo, Japan. I was in the last year of "primary school" (equivalent to Year 8), so school ended at around 3pm. When our class was packing our stuff to go home - suddenly the earthquake started. Under my desk, I thought I was going to die, I thought someone was taking away my life as well as my friends because at the time, my departure to France was already decided so I was going to be separated from my friends and I saw it as friends being taken away from me. When the first wave of earthquake settled, the teacher switched on the TV, and I saw a gigantic black tsunami carrying houses away and lives. I saw fire on water and red blinking of coastline around the map of Japan, danger zone of Tsunami...
Though I was not close to the epicentre of the earthquake it was the scariest experience of my life - can't imagine how it was like for those who actually saw the tsunami, and felt the earthquake.

Well - I understand why nuclear power station can be good or bad. I want to say I am for nuclear power station as long as it's safe because even if we live now, at this moment, without nuclear energy and use fossil fuels, it will slowly destroy the earth through global warming, which will affect every person on the earth and not only people in a small area around a nuclear power station. However, we can't EVER guarantee safety. There were solid embankments on the coastline of Fukushima, Miyazaki, these prefectures affected by the tsunami. But the height of the tsunami was unexpected. Nobody thought a tsunami this high would ever be approaching Japan - which then lead to a lot of deaths as well as the nuclear accident.
I don't know, really. There are other ways of producing electricity from renewable resources, like Solar panels, HEP etc. But they are usually more expensive or less efficient and requires a certain environmental condition... We want to get most out of least and the easiest way to achieve that is either fossil fuels or nuclear energy which have huge drawbacks as we already know...but we humans are too lazy ....
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meenu89
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Japan- a country that is almost the first to help others financially. My heart goes out to the survivors.
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C0balt
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Oh, you've merged two threads, cool
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Fizzel
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(Original post by arson_fire)
I think so. The science is quite safe, its the engineering that causes the problems. Fukushima was a combination of outdated designs, slack maintenance, and piss-poor management. They might be expensive but if they`re run correctly then they have a vital part to play in getting away from fossil fuels.
I'd agree with this but I would latch on to the run correctly part. The state needs to be all powerful in this regard and responsible. Nuclear power stations generally require state investment, and if they go wrong certainly require state clean up. If an after event report can find all these problems, they should have all be found and solutions enforced beforehand. Its another case of regulatory problems.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by PuddlesTheMonkey)
Three years ago today the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami took the lives of over 15 thousand people. Over a quarter of a million people have been displaced from their homes - some will never be able to return due to the radioactive fallout.

The earthquake and following tsunami also caused the meltdown of 3 out of 6 reactors at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

Whilst the plant has somewhat stabilised over the past three years, workers are still facing the problem of how to contain contaminated water and prevent it from leaking in to the surrounding areas and the sea.

Following the disaster Japan shut down all of its nuclear reactors (although it is now looking to re-open them). Germany decided it would shut down its oldest reactors. The downside, of course, is the consequential increase in greenhouse emissions.

Are the risks associated with nuclear power worth the benefits?


がんばれ 日本
Yes. And the risks are extremely low in probability.

There are 184 nuclear plants under the regulatory regime of the EU (and increasing) yet not a single meltdown (even Japan never had the explosion).

If even one EU reactor exploded that would still represent a 0.5% failure rate.

I ask you, which other form of electricity generation can match a 0.5% failure rate.
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Wh1t3Resistance
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It's not worth it. Let's not forget Chernobyl and today it's effects are still seen.
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The_Duck
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This could have been much worse. For an old power station in the process of being decommissioned to take 2 natural disasters to take it out, without a real explosion, is an excellent advertisement for how safe nuclear power really is.

The effects of the earthquake and tsunami were much more horrific, and I hope the problems caused by that can be resolved.
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Aj12
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(Original post by Wh1t3Resistance)
It's not worth it. Let's not forget Chernobyl and today it's effects are still seen.
Just as well we don't.build reactors like that anymore. With the reactor designs.we have today chenobyl 2.0 is nigh on impossible

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a-witty-name
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Remove money and specifically imaginary floaty numbers from society, and suddenly there's no benefit to nuclear power. Also, no recession.
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