fliss1992
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Hi -

I am currently studying the above poem and have several questions I need to answer.

My overall question I need to answer is -

Why is imagery so important in Wilfred Owens poem 'Dulce et Decorum Est.?'

I also have to explain what happens in the poem..

What was the purpose of the poem..

Why does Owen use so many literacy devices..

Are literacy devices central to the poem?

Can anybody please help?
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Carrot_Cake_13
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(Original post by fliss1992)
Hi -

I am currently studying the above poem and have several questions I need to answer.

My overall question I need to answer is -

Why is imagery so important in Wilfred Owens poem 'Dulce et Decorum Est.?'

I also have to explain what happens in the poem..

What was the purpose of the poem..

Why does Owen use so many literacy devices..

Are literacy devices central to the poem?

Can anybody please help?
Are you in yr 9..? And is it a practice CA you'd be doing?
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fliss1992
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No I'm not? Is there any specific reason you asked? I'm self taught from home.

It is practice YES
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Carrot_Cake_13
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(Original post by fliss1992)
No I'm not? Is there any specific reason you asked? I'm self taught from home.

It is practice YES
Mate, calm down..

I studied it in Year 9 + I've done a practised CA on it.. So I figured it would have been decent to ask cause I've still got my notes on the CA that I did on it.
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fliss1992
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I wasn't being funny, please don't take offence.

I'd appreciate any hep
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jamesg2
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Sorry I am late in responding but I only just noticed you request.

The purpose of the imagery is to dismantle the title and idea that death in war is something to be wished for. The poem was a response to the poem "The Call" by Jessie Pope. Although she never used the term Dulce Et Decomum Est, it is very much a notion that she fully agreed with and it is certainly a theme of "The Call.".

Some time ago I created a note on the poem. The note looks at the development of the poem through the four drafts that Owen undertook when creating the poem. I also examine the relationship between this poem and Jessie Pope's poem "The Call."

Here is the link to the file:-

https://www.transferbigfiles.com/e27...f9RFfOpCSxFYA2

Good luck
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lisaisabella
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(Original post by jamesg2)
Sorry I am late in responding but I only just noticed you request.

The purpose of the imagery is to dismantle the title and idea that death in war is something to be wished for. The poem was a response to the poem "The Call" by Jessie Pope. Although she never used the term Dulce Et Decomum Est, it is very much a notion that she fully agreed with and it is certainly a theme of "The Call.".

Some time ago I created a note on the poem. The note looks at the development of the poem through the four drafts that Owen undertook when creating the poem. I also examine the relationship between this poem and Jessie Pope's poem "The Call."

Here is the link to the file:-

https://www.transferbigfiles.com/e27...f9RFfOpCSxFYA2

Good luck
Hi do you happen to know any similarites in the poems dulce et decorum est, anthem for doomed youth, disabled, and mental cases? any help is appreicated thank you
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mollieking12345
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(Original post by fliss1992)
Hi -

I am currently studying the above poem and have several questions I need to answer.

My overall question I need to answer is -

Why is imagery so important in Wilfred Owens poem 'Dulce et Decorum Est.?'

I also have to explain what happens in the poem..

What was the purpose of the poem..

Why does Owen use so many literacy devices..

Are literacy devices central to the poem?

Can anybody please help?
i can help but not now as i am studying the same poem maybe we could work together and try to work out what your stuck on
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SlightlySummer
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It's been 5 years, I'm sure OP has figured it out kiddo
(Original post by mollieking12345)
i can help but not now as i am studying the same poem maybe we could work together and try to work out what your stuck on
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jamesg2
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I am currently studying the above poem and have several questions I need to answer.
My overall question I need to answer is -

1. Why is imagery so important in Wilfred Owens poem 'Dulce et Decorum Est.?'
Imagery is not specific to this poem. Imagery is one of the central tools available to the poet to assist in developing his/her narrative. Imagery are essentially “word pictures.” As the cliche explains “a pictures is with a thousand words.” Simile is a specific image it refers to a specific point. E.g. “he is as thick as a brick.” No offence intended. On L. 2 Owen says “Knock-kneed, coughing like hags.” The “coughing” is likened to how such women cough. There is no other reference than that. However on L. 5 Owen states “Men marched asleep.” That is a metaphor. Specifically metaphors are ambiguous and are not restricted to one meaning. So similes are a reference to a single picture, whereas metaphors are reference to multiple pictures. E.g. were they actually asleep, and if not what is the image suggesting.

Poetry is a condensed form of writing and therefore poets need a means whereby they can use language to suggest multiple ideas. Imagery is one way in which a three word sentence “Men marched asleep” can be interpreted into a series of different meanings and ideas. All of which may be different and all of which can be relevant. Imagery is one means by which the poet can introduce ideas which the reader can further develop for themselves.

2. I also have to explain what happens in the poem.
The poem is based on a real event. Owen was leading his troops back to base. While that was happening they came under attack from a German Phosgene attack. Now there are two different versions of this attack. In the final version it is implied the attack took place while Owen was leading his troops back to base. However in draft 1 of the poem are these four lines that remained in the poem until the final edit. To stay within the poem for so long suggests these were important lines to Owen. I believe - unlike the final edit and the accepted version of the poem - these lines describe what actually happened.

Then somewhere near in front: Whew, fup, fop, fup -
Gas shells or duds? We loosened masks in case –
And listened …. Nothing …. Far guns grumbled Krupp –
Then smartly Poison hit us in the face.

Hearing these noises Owen and his men loosened their masks to determine just what was going on. The tragedy about this is that when they did realize what was going on, they were now under attack from phosgene gas.

3. What was the purpose of the poem.
When this poem was first begun to be written Owen was in Craiglockhart hospital. Under Sassoon’s guidance Owen began writing poetry that focused on the “immediacy” - what was really going on like the front.

The origin of the title:-
The title “Dulce Et Decorum Est” comes from the “Orcles” of Horace: Number 2 –Augustam amice The line, which comes from verse 4, means: “It is sweet and proper to die for one’s country.”

The verse suggests because death will pursue those who flee the battle and those who are lame and disabled. Death will even pursue the contentious objector. Therefore essentially the verse suggests it is better to fight and die for your country because “death”
will hunt you down whoever and whatever you are.

The interesting point about this title is that it is very opposite of the content of the poem.
It is likely that Owen knew that the purpose of the content of the poem was going to destroy the idea contained within the poem’s title.

Jessie Pope:-
The changing subtitle:-
1. The first subtitle, in draft 1, was “( To Jessie Pope etc )” Jessie Pope was a poetess and had writing a poem called “The Call’ first published in the Daily Mail 26th November 1914. This was a paper Wilfred Owen read in 1914.

By 1917, Jessie Pope was the best known war poetess who had, by that time, published three poetry books. In his first draft Owen says “I must not speak of this thing as I might.” It may be that line was directed at Jessie. It is clear that she is the “friend” Owen refers to, and the one whom he addresses when he says “You would not go on telling with such zest” ( Again first draft. ) There is a heightened passion in that first draft that is not in the later versions.

2. In the second draft Owen changes the subtitle to “To a certain Poetess”, but there would be no doubt in people’s mind to whom he was addressing.

3. In the final draft Owen removes the subtitle. The poem is all the better for the removal. For although there was an aptness in addressing her, in the end it was not Jessie Pope to whom the message of the poem was really addressed.

References to “The Call” within “Dulce Et Decomum Est” :-

“Who’s fretting to begin
Who’s going out to win?
And who want to save his skin –“
Aside from the reference in Horace which makes clear that death will still pursue you, Pope is suggesting that those who are not eager to “begin”, to join the war, are cowards. Owen’s poem, particularly verse 2 points out why people should not be so eager to join. Owen’s poem suggests that the death of comrades in war is not
transitory.

The graphic death of this soldier is at the heart of the poem. Verse 3 demonstrates that long after the death of this soldier Owen is still unable to forget what he saw. It is not just the horrifying death of the soldier, those who witness the death will be affected by the death for years after the event.

“Who’ll earn the Empire’s thanks –
Will you, my laddie?”
Pope’s point is that if you join up you will win medals and fame. Contrast these lines with Owen’s 3rd last line in verse 4
“To children ardent for some desperate glory”

Popes idea to “earn the Empire’s thanks” was a common idea at the time i.e. getting medals and rewards for joining the war. Owen suggests with the phrase “ardent for some desperate glory” that this argument is succeeding. Young people may well be joining for that very reason: to gain medals and fame. The lines 25 and 26, are critical of the government in encouraging such people to join for this reason.

Jessie Pope goes on to say:
“When the procession comes.
Banners and rolling drums –
Who’ll stand and bite his thumbs –“
Owen’s poetry is against this infectious call to join the army. To be fair, in the early years of the war, such parades harvested thousands of recruits. Pope argued that those who stood aside were cowards. The idea of foolishly joining the war is at the heart of Owen’s poetry. For example, the Owen’s first title for “Disabled” was “Why did he join?” “Disabled” may be the finer title, however “Why did he join?” is a theme that is at the heart of the “Disabled”.The critical point about Owen’s poem is to demonstrate the truth of war and the truth about death in war. Jessie Pope’s poem is all about glorifying the idea of death in war. Owen’s poem contradicts this poem and idea by describing the reality of death in war

4. Why does Owen use so many literacy devices.
This point has been addressed in my response to your first question.

5. Are literacy devices central to the poem?
What do you think??
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mollieking12345
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i think its great thnxs
I am currently studying the above poem and have several questions I need to answer.
My overall question I need to answer is -

1. Why is imagery so important in Wilfred Owens poem 'Dulce et Decorum Est.?'
Imagery is not specific to this poem. Imagery is one of the central tools available to the poet to assist in developing his/her narrative. Imagery are essentially “word pictures.” As the cliche explains “a pictures is with a thousand words.” Simile is a specific image it refers to a specific point. E.g. “he is as thick as a brick.” No offence intended. On L. 2 Owen says “Knock-kneed, coughing like hags.” The “coughing” is likened to how such women cough. There is no other reference than that. However on L. 5 Owen states “Men marched asleep.” That is a metaphor. Specifically metaphors are ambiguous and are not restricted to one meaning. So similes are a reference to a single picture, whereas metaphors are reference to multiple pictures. E.g. were they actually asleep, and if not what is the image suggesting.

Poetry is a condensed form of writing and therefore poets need a means whereby they can use language to suggest multiple ideas. Imagery is one way in which a three word sentence “Men marched asleep” can be interpreted into a series of different meanings and ideas. All of which may be different and all of which can be relevant. Imagery is one means by which the poet can introduce ideas which the reader can further develop for themselves.

2. I also have to explain what happens in the poem.
The poem is based on a real event. Owen was leading his troops back to base. While that was happening they came under attack from a German Phosgene attack. Now there are two different versions of this attack. In the final version it is implied the attack took place while Owen was leading his troops back to base. However in draft 1 of the poem are these four lines that remained in the poem until the final edit. To stay within the poem for so long suggests these were important lines to Owen. I believe - unlike the final edit and the accepted version of the poem - these lines describe what actually happened.

Then somewhere near in front: Whew, fup, fop, fup -
Gas shells or duds? We loosened masks in case –
And listened …. Nothing …. Far guns grumbled Krupp –
Then smartly Poison hit us in the face.

Hearing these noises Owen and his men loosened their masks to determine just what was going on. The tragedy about this is that when they did realize what was going on, they were now under attack from phosgene gas.

3. What was the purpose of the poem.
When this poem was first begun to be written Owen was in Craiglockhart hospital. Under Sassoon’s guidance Owen began writing poetry that focused on the “immediacy” - what was really going on like the front.

The origin of the title:-
The title “Dulce Et Decorum Est” comes from the “Orcles” of Horace: Number 2 –Augustam amice The line, which comes from verse 4, means: “It is sweet and proper to die for one’s country.”

The verse suggests because death will pursue those who flee the battle and those who are lame and disabled. Death will even pursue the contentious objector. Therefore essentially the verse suggests it is better to fight and die for your country because “death”
will hunt you down whoever and whatever you are.

The interesting point about this title is that it is very opposite of the content of the poem.
It is likely that Owen knew that the purpose of the content of the poem was going to destroy the idea contained within the poem’s title.

Jessie Pope:-
The changing subtitle:-
1. The first subtitle, in draft 1, was “( To Jessie Pope etc )” Jessie Pope was a poetess and had writing a poem called “The Call’ first published in the Daily Mail 26th November 1914. This was a paper Wilfred Owen read in 1914.

By 1917, Jessie Pope was the best known war poetess who had, by that time, published three poetry books. In his first draft Owen says “I must not speak of this thing as I might.” It may be that line was directed at Jessie. It is clear that she is the “friend” Owen refers to, and the one whom he addresses when he says “You would not go on telling with such zest” ( Again first draft. ) There is a heightened passion in that first draft that is not in the later versions.

2. In the second draft Owen changes the subtitle to “To a certain Poetess”, but there would be no doubt in people’s mind to whom he was addressing.

3. In the final draft Owen removes the subtitle. The poem is all the better for the removal. For although there was an aptness in addressing her, in the end it was not Jessie Pope to whom the message of the poem was really addressed.

References to “The Call” within “Dulce Et Decomum Est” :-

“Who’s fretting to begin
Who’s going out to win?
And who want to save his skin –“
Aside from the reference in Horace which makes clear that death will still pursue you, Pope is suggesting that those who are not eager to “begin”, to join the war, are cowards. Owen’s poem, particularly verse 2 points out why people should not be so eager to join. Owen’s poem suggests that the death of comrades in war is not
transitory.

The graphic death of this soldier is at the heart of the poem. Verse 3 demonstrates that long after the death of this soldier Owen is still unable to forget what he saw. It is not just the horrifying death of the soldier, those who witness the death will be affected by the death for years after the event.

“Who’ll earn the Empire’s thanks –
Will you, my laddie?”
Pope’s point is that if you join up you will win medals and fame. Contrast these lines with Owen’s 3rd last line in verse 4
“To children ardent for some desperate glory”

Popes idea to “earn the Empire’s thanks” was a common idea at the time i.e. getting medals and rewards for joining the war. Owen suggests with the phrase “ardent for some desperate glory” that this argument is succeeding. Young people may well be joining for that very reason: to gain medals and fame. The lines 25 and 26, are critical of the government in encouraging such people to join for this reason.

Jessie Pope goes on to say:
“When the procession comes.
Banners and rolling drums –
Who’ll stand and bite his thumbs –“
Owen’s poetry is against this infectious call to join the army. To be fair, in the early years of the war, such parades harvested thousands of recruits. Pope argued that those who stood aside were cowards. The idea of foolishly joining the war is at the heart of Owen’s poetry. For example, the Owen’s first title for “Disabled” was “Why did he join?” “Disabled” may be the finer title, however “Why did he join?” is a theme that is at the heart of the “Disabled”.The critical point about Owen’s poem is to demonstrate the truth of war and the truth about death in war. Jessie Pope’s poem is all about glorifying the idea of death in war. Owen’s poem contradicts this poem and idea by describing the reality of death in war

4. Why does Owen use so many literacy devices.
This point has been addressed in my response to your first question.

5. Are literacy devices central to the poem?
What do you think??
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