Can someone explain electrolysis as simply as possible?

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Trihawk7
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Right, lets just say, I'm not the best at chemistry but I do want to succeed in it.

Electrolysis isn't my strong point and neither are a lot of things in chemistry, but I'm putting my head down, two months before the exam to get everything I don't understand together.

But can someone explain electrolysis in one or two lines? Everything else on the internet is full paragraphs... I understand cations, anion, apparatuses etc. But the definition and understanding baffles me, and how can you work out the equations because all my teacher says is "just remember these six equations" and I seriously cannot remember them so I'd prefer to just work on paper to figure out the equations.

Thanks
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suzylemonade
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Basically, passing an electric current through an ionic substance to break it up.
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Chlorophile
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
Basically, passing an electric current through an ionic substance to break it up.
This, basically. It's worth adding that the substance has to be in liquid form.
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lyricalvibe
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(Original post by Trihawk7)
Right, lets just say, I'm not the best at chemistry but I do want to succeed in it.

Electrolysis isn't my strong point and neither are a lot of things in chemistry, but I'm putting my head down, two months before the exam to get everything I don't understand together.

But can someone explain electrolysis in one or two lines? Everything else on the internet is full paragraphs... I understand cations, anion, apparatuses etc. But the definition and understanding baffles me, and how can you work out the equations because all my teacher says is "just remember these six equations" and I seriously cannot remember them so I'd prefer to just work on paper to figure out the equations.

Thanks
This is my revision bro...
Electrolysis is decomposing a substance using electricity.For the equation though that takes more understanding so hopefully someone else explain
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suzylemonade
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If a substance is in solution (e.g if it is dissolved in water), then H+ and OH- ions will also be present in the solution.
This is what happens at the negative and positive electrodes when you electrolyse a substance in solution:

At the negative electrode:
Both the H+ ions and the positive ions from the substance will be attracted to this electrode.
Hydrogen (H+) will be produced if the ion is more reactive than hydrogen.
When hydrogen is produced, 2 hydrogen ions get 1 electron each from the negative electrode and become atoms of hydrogen. These two hydrogen atoms bond together and are released as hydrogen (H2) gas. The hydrogen atoms are said to have been reduced as they have gained electrons (OIL RIG)
Equation: 2H+ + 2e- ----> H2 (g)

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interstitial
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
Basically, passing an electric current through an ionic substance to break it up.
In aqueous or molten form...

Solid ionic substances don't conduct.

To OP (a bit more detailed) - Essentially this, but it only works with ionic substances because the molecules involved have a distinct charge, and in molten or aqueous form so the ions aren't fixed in their lattice so they are free to conduct electricity and make charges on the electrodes which cause the oppositely charged atoms to be attracted electrostatically to the electrodes so it essentially splits up the ionic substance (electro = electricity, lysis = splitting up).

Oxidation (loss of electrons) occurs at negative electrode.

Reduction (gain of electrons) occurs at positive electrode.

At the negative electrode, either the substance in the bond is given off or hydrogen if the substance in the bond is more reactive.

At the positive electrode, either oxygen is given off or a halide if it is in the ionically bonded substance.


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suzylemonade
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(Original post by majmuh24)
In aqueous or molten form...

Solid ionic substances don't conduct.

To OP (a bit more detailed) - Essentially this, but it only works with ionic substances because the molecules involved have a distinct charge, and in molten or aqueous form so the ions aren't fixed in their lattice so they are free to conduct electricity and make charges on the electrodes which cause the oppositely charged atoms to be attracted electrostatically to the electrodes so it essentially splits up the ionic substance (electro = electricity, lysis = splitting up).

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Yeah, but I couldn't be asked to type that out. Plus he asked for simple xD
Check the second thing I posted on here please, not sure how accurate it is- it's been ages since I last revised electrolysis
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
Yeah, but I couldn't be asked to type that out. Plus he asked for simple xD
Check the second thing I posted on here please, not sure how accurate it is- it's been ages since I last revised electrolysis
Yep, seems good, nice touch with the half equations (but Y u no mention reduction/oxidation? )

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suzylemonade
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(Original post by majmuh24)
Yep, seems good, nice touch with the half equations (but Y u no mention reduction/oxidation? )

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Ooh yeah. OIL RIG and all that.
Let me add that.
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
Ooh yeah. OIL RIG and all that.
Let me add that.
Already done.

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suzylemonade
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(Original post by majmuh24)
Already done.

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Speedy xD
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suzylemonade
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Also, OIL RIG- this is a nice way to remember oxidation and reduction

Oxidation
Is
Loss (of electrons)

Reduction
Is
Gain (of electrons)
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Trihawk7
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
Ooh yeah. OIL RIG and all that.
Let me add that.
Nice thanks for the OIL RIG quote, makes remembering oxidation and reduction lot more easier
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suzylemonade
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(Original post by Trihawk7)
Nice thanks for the OIL RIG quote, makes remembering oxidation and reduction lot more easier
No problem
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Trihawk7
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Right I know what Electrolysis is but... the equations still baffle me, sorry guys for my baffled mind. I'll figure it out, but really do appreciate you guys, sometimes you should be teachers and sometimes the teachers should be students
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suzylemonade
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(Original post by Trihawk7)
Right I know what Electrolysis is but... the equations still baffle me, sorry guys for my baffled mind. I'll figure it out, but really do appreciate you guys, sometimes you should be teachers and sometimes the teachers should be students
Hmm. What about them baffles you? Is it how to do them?

Hell yeah xD I could totally imagine myself as a teacher xD
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Trihawk7
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
Hmm. What about them baffles you? Is it how to do them?

Hell yeah xD I could totally imagine myself as a teacher xD
Well I guess it is? Someone explained it in this thread but my mind just went blank when I read it... I catch it one day, just not yet -_-
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