andy96
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Biology is stressing me out. I am quite passionate about the subject and I enjoy it (mostly... excluding biochemistry). There's so much content and I don't know how to successfully learn everything. I feel like I don't know the most important parts of the syllabus so when I'm making revision notes I don't know what's most important and what isn't... Some tips of revision would be great!
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Hype en Ecosse
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(Original post by andy96)
Biology is stressing me out. I am quite passionate about the subject and I enjoy it (mostly... excluding biochemistry). There's so much content and I don't know how to successfully learn everything. I feel like I don't know the most important parts of the syllabus so when I'm making revision notes I don't know what's most important and what isn't... Some tips of revision would be great!
I don't like biochemstry either. :lol:

The best thing you can do is stop looking at the workload in terms of the whole course, as that makes it look more daunting than it is and is more likely to put you off working. Break it up into little, digestible chunks. Like I'll sit down and say I'm going to study hyponatraemia, hypernatraemia, and drugs that affect the kidney - which sounds much more manageable than saying "I'll revise some renal stuff".

Next is just repetition. The thing with biology is that you have to get a load of information in your head and then apply it to a question, and it's very easy to forget things if you don't go back to them! Just decide well in advance what you're going to look at: very specific topics like "DNA transcription", "cell ultrastructure", etc. How you decide to get that info in your head is your choice. You might like flash cards (I'd recommend Anki for this). I like writing out things in my own words, in a way that makes sense to me.

What stuff's most important is just the stuff you see that keep coming up in class and past papers. Having a broad understanding of important concepts and processes is most important, then little details come later (like that aerobic respiration produces 38ATP).
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MarkProbio
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Pretty much what Hype En Cosse said.

I'm currently doing OCR A2 and we've covered everything but gene technologies. I've made sure the evening after my lesson that I learned the main parts of the topic from my text books (CGP is awesome for this). I did this via looking at the specification and condensing information into bullet points or sequences (for processes such as transcription or respiration).

The day after I then compound what I've learnt into a poster that I stick on my bedroom wall. That way I'm going over each topic for at least two days and I always have a reminder handy if needed.

Everyone learns differently but personally I find the more you write something, the more you remember it. Even if you know it already, write it out so it stays there - its surprising how much I remember from writing stuff I did even six months ago and I believe it's doable by anybody with patience and determination.

Good luck though man, you'll find your way eventually!
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Masoudy
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Enjoy it, always ask yourself how does these biscuits work, imagine yourself explaining it to someone and do really explain it to someone, like a boss who knows everything

Though biochemistry is the gem of biology, not everyone does it and its the core of "the science of bio" like I only knew how drugs really work after my last week's Biochemistry lectures and got behind for not doing well in it before uni

Tyson is always a great source of motivation for science students: http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Neil_deGrasse_Tyson
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DLau88
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rewrite your notes and after you have written them try to repeat everything you have learned without looking
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Tillybop
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(Original post by andy96)
Biology is stressing me out. I am quite passionate about the subject and I enjoy it (mostly... excluding biochemistry). There's so much content and I don't know how to successfully learn everything. I feel like I don't know the most important parts of the syllabus so when I'm making revision notes I don't know what's most important and what isn't... Some tips of revision would be great!
With biology you need to aim at condensing it into much smaller amounts to learn. Try writing bullet points on each topic and maybe limit yourself to 20 bullet points per topic. It's difficult but you have to try to squeeze the amount down to something much more manageable. When you make your bullet points go through the revision guide and pick out the keywords and make sure you include those. Key terms make it much easier to understand the main topics too.

Past papers are always a good way to revise. You find that you really need to know how to apply everything you know from this. They also give you a taster for what the exams will be like.

If you don't like biochemistry (this is my favourite part) then you might find you need to work harder at it to do well.

I find the following helps with my revision:

+ Powerpoints
+ Writing condensed notes
+ Making videos - either yourself talking to a webcam or like an animation type thing - both are great and more creative)
+ Highlight the key terms in the revision guide
+ Drawing spider diagrams with the key points in

Good luck
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Hayder120
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(Original post by MarkProbio)
Pretty much what Hype En Cosse said.

I'm currently doing OCR A2 and we've covered everything but gene technologies. I've made sure the evening after my lesson that I learned the main parts of the topic from my text books (CGP is awesome for this). I did this via looking at the specification and condensing information into bullet points or sequences (for processes such as transcription or respiration).

The day after I then compound what I've learnt into a poster that I stick on my bedroom wall. That way I'm going over each topic for at least two days and I always have a reminder handy if needed.

Everyone learns differently but personally I find the more you write something, the more you remember it. Even if you know it already, write it out so it stays there - its surprising how much I remember from writing stuff I did even six months ago and I believe it's doable by anybody with patience and determination.

Good luck though man, you'll find your way eventually!
(Original post by MarkProbio)
Pretty much what Hype En Cosse said.

I'm currently doing OCR A2 and we've covered everything but gene technologies. I've made sure the evening after my lesson that I learned the main parts of the topic from my text books (CGP is awesome for this). I did this via looking at the specification and condensing information into bullet points or sequences (for processes such as transcription or respiration).

The day after I then compound what I've learnt into a poster that I stick on my bedroom wall. That way I'm going over each topic for at least two days and I always have a reminder handy if needed.

Everyone learns differently but personally I find the more you write something, the more you remember it. Even if you know it already, write it out so it stays there - its surprising how much I remember from writing stuff I did even six months ago and I believe it's doable by anybody with patience and determination.

Good luck though man, you'll find your way eventually!
(Original post by andy96)
Biology is stressing me out. I am quite passionate about the subject and I enjoy it (mostly... excluding biochemistry). There's so much content and I don't know how to successfully learn everything. I feel like I don't know the most important parts of the syllabus so when I'm making revision notes I don't know what's most important and what isn't... Some tips of revision would be great!
(Original post by DLau88)
rewrite your notes and after you have written them try to repeat everything you have learned without looking
(Original post by Tilly-Elizabeth)
With biology you need to aim at condensing it into much smaller amounts to learn. Try writing bullet points on each topic and maybe limit yourself to 20 bullet points per topic. It's difficult but you have to try to squeeze the amount down to something much more manageable. When you make your bullet points go through the revision guide and pick out the keywords and make sure you include those. Key terms make it much easier to understand the main topics too.

Past papers are always a good way to revise. You find that you really need to know how to apply everything you know from this. They also give you a taster for what the exams will be like.

If you don't like biochemistry (this is my favourite part) then you might find you need to work harder at it to do well.

I find the following helps with my revision:

+ Powerpoints
+ Writing condensed notes
+ Making videos - either yourself talking to a webcam or like an animation type thing - both are great and more creative)
+ Highlight the key terms in the revision guide
+ Drawing spider diagrams with the key points in

Good luck

For those of you wanting OCR biology notes for either AS and A2.

Have a look for my post: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2632967


your welcome, please if you want to give feedback, complement my teacher, NOT ME.
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andy96
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thank you everyone! i've gone by the spec which is also really good and just ticked off the stuff i know! really helpful thanks guyss! <3
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