lmorgan95
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Hey, I was looking for tips on how to be hitting 90+ums on these papers... i seem to generally have a good understanding the materials but some days i just make silly mistakes.

Do students that score these A* levels have a special method for proof-reading and sense-checking their answers as i go? i generally just gamble that every decision i make when answering the paper is a good one the first time and only go back and check my work at the end as apposed to as i progress through the paper. Is this bad?

What other methods would people recommend for people aiming to score 90+ums on these harder papers? anything such as:
  • solomons/delphis/gold papers under timed conditions (harder papers)
  • doing all the mixed exercises in the c3/c4 books
  • making notes of any questions i get wrong/find difficult and reviewing over them at a later date?


Would really appreciate whatever advice people can give me- i'm currently getting around 90% on quite a few papers anyway but i really want to be confident i was consistently get top marks before the exams in june.
1
reply
minnigayuen
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
Well you're doing pretty much all you can to be honest, if those bullet points are what you're doing i'm sure you'll score +90 ums with ease.

If you want to be extremely thorough, i suppose you could write what you're doing in a "wordy" sense when you complete questions, to ensure that the actual understanding of the method sticks in your head.

I also created my own little revision guide booklets for all of my modules which was really helpful - basically a guide for basic methods and little tricks/tips that i've noticed along the way or which aren't covered well in class.
1
reply
lmorgan95
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by minnigayuen)
Well you're doing pretty much all you can to be honest, if those bullet points are what you're doing i'm sure you'll score +90 ums with ease.

If you want to be extremely thorough, i suppose you could write what you're doing in a "wordy" sense when you complete questions, to ensure that the actual understanding of the method sticks in your head.

I also created my own little revision guide booklets for all of my modules which was really helpful - basically a guide for basic methods and little tricks/tips that i've noticed along the way or which aren't covered well in class.
cool i might give that a go. i haven't done all of those things yet but it's what i'm planning on doing- one thing i was wondering though is whether it's worth doing the harder papers under timed conditions or just working through them at my own pace?
on the one hand it might be better to condition myself to answer them quicker but on the other hand maybe spending longer trying to work out questions i'm stuck on could be more beneficial, then just doing actual past papers in exam conditions closer to the time?
0
reply
minnigayuen
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by lmorgan95)
cool i might give that a go. i haven't done all of those things yet but it's what i'm planning on doing- one thing i was wondering though is whether it's worth doing the harder papers under timed conditions or just working through them at my own pace?
on the one hand it might be better to condition myself to answer them quicker but on the other hand maybe spending longer trying to work out questions i'm stuck on could be more beneficial, then just doing actual past papers in exam conditions closer to the time?
I rarely did my past papers under timed conditions, i never really found that time was a problem, so under my bias experience i'd agree that it'd be more helpful to just work yourself at your own pace for the harder soloman papers - but save one or two perhaps for a timed practice.

However, always make sure that you put yourself under strict conditions when you do the papers with no distractions around you, e.g no checking your facebook halfway through. I found this made a huge difference to my performance, if i actually committed to the paper or not.
0
reply
SecretDuck
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
Practice makes perfect. The more questions you tackle, the better. May I also suggest Solomon papers?
1
reply
Old_Simon
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
In my experience eliminating silly errors is much harder than actually learning how to do the stuff which for me is pretty simple. I am error prone though and make arithmetical slips a lot. Practise helps, meticulous checking as I go, always doing things the same way, not taking short cuts, I do everything I can. A guy can go from A* to B on silly slips alone with no problem even if he answers every question confidently (he thinks). That is what worries me.
3
reply
Anythingoo1
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
C3 - Don't make any stupid mistakes

C4 - Fully understand the content (vectors can be tricky)
1
reply
lmorgan95
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by Old_Simon)
In my experience eliminating silly errors is much harder than actually learning how to do the stuff which for me is pretty simple. I am error prone though and make arithmetical slips a lot. Practise helps, meticulous checking as I go, always doing things the same way, not taking short cuts, I do everything I can. A guy can go from A* to B on silly slips alone with no problem even if he answers every question confidently (he thinks). That is what worries me.
i am the same, although i've started trying to just review over each line i make and try to check if it follows logically from the last and such...
it's really difficult because generally speaking i just go through the question without checking any of it until the end instead of this meticulous checking you were saying.. although i just tried it on a C3 paper that was 63/75 for A* and got a 66 so i'm quite happy about that considering this time last year i was getting C's and D's
0
reply
lmorgan95
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by Anythingoo1)
C3 - Don't make any stupid mistakes

C4 - Fully understand the content (vectors can be tricky)
if i'm feeling confident on C3 what do you think are the best steps to take to master C4?
i was thinking go through all the review exercises, find areas that i might find particularly hard (some integration, vectors) and have a look through all the questions/examples in that section, then do some solomons papers/past papers?
0
reply
Old_Simon
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by lmorgan95)
if i'm feeling confident on C3 what do you think are the best steps to take to master C4?
i was thinking go through all the review exercises, find areas that i might find particularly hard (some integration, vectors) and have a look through all the questions/examples in that section, then do some solomons papers/past papers?
This is what I would do for c4 if I were in your situation. First make sure I really understand the exam specification so print it off and review it. Next up is good notes. For every single item in the spec you need a page of notes clearly commented telling you how it works. For every new thing you note up, also do the exercise. At least start the exercise right away and keep going back till it is all done perfectly. Redo mistakes etc. Now the next step is most important and is skimped in all schools and text books. Make sure you have a worked example of every type of question which that topic can throw up. Consult the mark schemes as you put your example together. Comment important items.
So: Each new thing you learn has a page of notes, an exercise and a lot of full worked examples. Now make a list of the questions. That is your revision self tester sheet. Each question has the worked example / answer.
Now what I do which is different is I consult past papers as I go along. I do not "save them up". You can not remember them all so you can do them over in your revision period. As I go through the questions for each topic I make sure I have the model answer already or I add it then I add the type of question to my reviser sheet. The last thing I do as I go along is I create my "cheat sheets". These are single page reviser notes on everything that is in that topic.

The big ticket items in C4 are integration and vectors. They both need a lot of work. Good luck. HTH.
4
reply
Anythingoo1
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by lmorgan95)
if i'm feeling confident on C3 what do you think are the best steps to take to master C4?
i was thinking go through all the review exercises, find areas that i might find particularly hard (some integration, vectors) and have a look through all the questions/examples in that section, then do some solomons papers/past papers?
See I wouldn't bother with notes, just do all the questions you can tbh, if you do all the review exercise questions then past papers, then solomons then there is no reason why you should be getting less than 85ums
0
reply
lmorgan95
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by Old_Simon)
This is what I would do for c4 if I were in your situation. First make sure I really understand the exam specification so print it off and review it. Next up is good notes. For every single item in the spec you need a page of notes clearly commented telling you how it works. For every new thing you note up, also do the exercise. At least start the exercise right away and keep going back till it is all done perfectly. Redo mistakes etc. Now the next step is most important and is skimped in all schools and text books. Make sure you have a worked example of every type of question which that topic can throw up. Consult the mark schemes as you put your example together. Comment important items.
So: Each new thing you learn has a page of notes, an exercise and a lot of full worked examples. Now make a list of the questions. That is your revision self tester sheet. Each question has the worked example / answer.
Now what I do which is different is I consult past papers as I go along. I do not "save them up". You can not remember them all so you can do them over in your revision period. As I go through the questions for each topic I make sure I have the model answer already or I add it then I add the type of question to my reviser sheet. The last thing I do as I go along is I create my "cheat sheets". These are single page reviser notes on everything that is in that topic.

The big ticket items in C4 are integration and vectors. They both need a lot of work. Good luck. HTH.
I cant help but feel like the idea of a revision book won't work for me is the thing.. i've had a terrible habit of writing revision guides/sheets for myself in the past and not looking at them enough or not feeling like i got enough out of them to justify the time they took to make.

Do you think that if purely DOING maths seems to be the best thing for me, a good substitute would be this:

Tackle as many questions as i possibly can, focusing on the harder or more in-depth areas (integration, vectors) and leave a mark next to all the questions i find that make me think differently or require me to adapt my knowledge, or simply really difficult questions.

I've been doing this so far doing through the questions in the C4 book one by one and just leaving a * by any particularly confusing/odd/different questions which i'll hopefully review back over, so i don't just repeat a load of questions that i can already easily do.

Let me know if you think this would be useful as a substitute for the whole revision booklet idea if i don't think it will work for me
0
reply
Angryification
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 years ago
#13
Don't bother with the vectors questions in the Edexcel C4 book - go for the questions from past papers for this spec
0
reply
lmorgan95
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#14
(Original post by Anythingoo1)
See I wouldn't bother with notes, just do all the questions you can tbh, if you do all the review exercise questions then past papers, then solomons then there is no reason why you should be getting less than 85ums
honestly this is what i was thinking- just doing questions whenever i get the chance and keeping note of questions that are different or require me to use the knowledge differently.
0
reply
Old_Simon
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#15
Report 7 years ago
#15
(Original post by lmorgan95)
I cant help but feel like the idea of a revision book won't work for me is the thing.. i've had a terrible habit of writing revision guides/sheets for myself in the past and not looking at them enough or not feeling like i got enough out of them to justify the time they took to make.

Do you think that if purely DOING maths seems to be the best thing for me, a good substitute would be this:

Tackle as many questions as i possibly can, focusing on the harder or more in-depth areas (integration, vectors) and leave a mark next to all the questions i find that make me think differently or require me to adapt my knowledge, or simply really difficult questions.

I've been doing this so far doing through the questions in the C4 book one by one and just leaving a * by any particularly confusing/odd/different questions which i'll hopefully review back over, so i don't just repeat a load of questions that i can already easily do.

Let me know if you think this would be useful as a substitute for the whole revision booklet idea if i don't think it will work for me
Well don't just star awkward stuff for later. That is the very stuff you need to learn. I wrote a longer reply but it vanished
0
reply
lmorgan95
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#16
(Original post by Old_Simon)
Well don't just star awkward stuff for later. That is the very stuff you need to learn. I wrote a longer reply but it vanished
Yeah sorry what i meant is spend time understanding how to do the question first but put a star by it so i know that when it comes to the last couple of weeks i can skim through the book/sheets and quickly identify questions that have been different or caught me out before to see if they catch me out again.
1
reply
lmorgan95
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#17
(Original post by Angryification)
Don't bother with the vectors questions in the Edexcel C4 book - go for the questions from past papers for this spec
is there a reason for this? we've only just started covering vectors in class last week because it's the last topic we have left to cover
0
reply
QuantumSuicide
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#18
Report 7 years ago
#18
C3 and C4 are fairly easy. For C3 you really need to master trig and differentiation. Be familiar with all identities and practice as many proof questions as you can.

C4 is just mostly calculus. Get a lot of practice on integration and you've got half the marks in the exam. Partial fractions and binomial questions should be free marks. Vectors just requires time and understanding.

Posted from TSR Mobile
1
reply
Angryification
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#19
Report 7 years ago
#19
(Original post by lmorgan95)
is there a reason for this? we've only just started covering vectors in class last week because it's the last topic we have left to cover
My advice: learn as much of the vectors stuff so you can recognise what's is going on in a question. The 2D vectors exercises where they give you shapes and points dividing lines in a given ratio is not very useful. From all of the papers I've done [all since 2009], they're definitely more interested in seeing if you can answer questions with 3D vectors. They aren't going to tell you to "find a.b" and "find the magnitude of a". It's more like "find a vector equation of this line", "show that these lines intersect", "find the acute angle between these lines" and "find the area of this parallelogram" [there's a nice trick called the cross product for that last one - ask your teacher about it. He/she may not go over it because it's in FP3]
1
reply
Liamnut
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#20
Report 7 years ago
#20
(Original post by lmorgan95)
cool i might give that a go. i haven't done all of those things yet but it's what i'm planning on doing- one thing i was wondering though is whether it's worth doing the harder papers under timed conditions or just working through them at my own pace?
on the one hand it might be better to condition myself to answer them quicker but on the other hand maybe spending longer trying to work out questions i'm stuck on could be more beneficial, then just doing actual past papers in exam conditions closer to the time?
I'd say just take your time now. When you properly understand the material and how to apply your knowledge, you can finish c3 papers in 45-60 minutes before checking your answers, especially then older ones. I haven't done any c4 papers yet, but I'm sure it's a similar story,
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (171)
44.19%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (43)
11.11%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (32)
8.27%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (83)
21.45%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (36)
9.3%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (22)
5.68%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed