Chlorophile
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I'm really interested in the Earth Sciences in general, but I'm definitely much more interested in the theory (e.g. making simulations, physics, etc.) than practical geology. Geophysics sounds right up my street, but the issue is that most Geophysics degrees seem to be focussed on rocks rather than atmospheric processes. Whilst I don't know what branch of Geophysics I want to specialise in, I at least want to have the option to specialise in atmospheric physics open. I'm concerned that if I apply for - and get in - to courses such as Geophysics at Imperial, it'll close the doors to pathways such as atmospheric physics. Is this true and are these concerns valid?

NB: I really do not want to do a degree in pure physics.
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jonnny
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
I'm really interested in the Earth Sciences in general, but I'm definitely much more interested in the theory (e.g. making simulations, physics, etc.) than practical geology. Geophysics sounds right up my street, but the issue is that most Geophysics degrees seem to be focussed on rocks rather than atmospheric processes. Whilst I don't know what branch of Geophysics I want to specialise in, I at least want to have the option to specialise in atmospheric physics open. I'm concerned that if I apply for - and get in - to courses such as Geophysics at Imperial, it'll close the doors to pathways such as atmospheric physics. Is this true and are these concerns valid?

NB: I really do not want to do a degree in pure physics.
Check out UEA. I think they do a climate/atmosphere degree with a lot kf maths/physics involved


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Chlorophile
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(Original post by jonnny)
Check out UEA. I think they do a climate/atmosphere degree with a lot kf maths/physics involved


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Is their course good? They're not exactly at the top of the ranking tables.
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Zottula
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
I'm really interested in the Earth Sciences in general, but I'm definitely much more interested in the theory (e.g. making simulations, physics, etc.) than practical geology. Geophysics sounds right up my street, but the issue is that most Geophysics degrees seem to be focussed on rocks rather than atmospheric processes. Whilst I don't know what branch of Geophysics I want to specialise in, I at least want to have the option to specialise in atmospheric physics open. I'm concerned that if I apply for - and get in - to courses such as Geophysics at Imperial, it'll close the doors to pathways such as atmospheric physics. Is this true and are these concerns valid?

NB: I really do not want to do a degree in pure physics.
Edinburgh offer a Geophysics and Meteorology degree. Maybe that would be of interest?

At Imperial the Geophysics course is great (as are the rest of their earth science courses), but there isn't really anything in the way of atmospheric stuff as geophysics in general is more concerned with studying the earth's interior.
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jonnny
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
Is their course good? They're not exactly at the top of the ranking tables.
Well their pretty highly rated...one of the best in the country


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Chlorophile
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(Original post by jonnny)
Well their pretty highly rated...one of the best in the country


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Really? They're 13th in the Guardian national league tables for Earth and Marine sciences, and close to 100th globally according to QS. That's not bad, but it's not comparable to the reputation of an institution like Imperial or Oxford. And the employment % after 6 months for Climate Science at UEA is 65%...
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jonnny
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
Really? They're 13th in the Guardian national league tables for Earth and Marine sciences, and close to 100th globally according to QS. That's not bad, but it's not comparable to the reputation of an institution like Imperial or Oxford. And the employment % after 6 months for Climate Science at UEA is 65%...
Well the only places that have a reputation that's comparable to oxford and imperial are oxford and imperial (Cambridge as well obviously). Why do you care so much about the reputation of the university so much anyway? Much better to do a course that you like at a slightly lower ranked university than a course you don't at a higher ranked university


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Chlorophile
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(Original post by jonnny)
Well the only places that have a reputation that's comparable to oxford and imperial are oxford and imperial (Cambridge as well obviously). Why do you care so much about the reputation of the university so much anyway? Much better to do a course that you like at a slightly lower ranked university than a course you don't at a higher ranked university

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Because Oxford and Imperial have excellent courses that I'm also interested in, and the work prospects, course quality and quality of students will be higher.
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jonnny
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
Because Oxford and Imperial have excellent courses that I'm also interested in, and the work prospects, course quality and quality of students will be higher.
Fair enough, well not that I'm at all an expert but if your doing Geophysics, then there'll no doubt be a significant amount of pure maths and physics, which of course would be relevant to atmospheric physics. Just depends on whether you want an element of atmospheric physics at UG or would be happy leaving it til postgrad.

take my 'advice' with a pinch of salt cos I don't know what I'm talking about really
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rock_climber86
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(Original post by jonnny)
Fair enough, well not that I'm at all an expert but if your doing Geophysics, then there'll no doubt be a significant amount of pure maths and physics, which of course would be relevant to atmospheric physics. Just depends on whether you want an element of atmospheric physics at UG or would be happy leaving it til postgrad.

take my 'advice' with a pinch of salt cos I don't know what I'm talking about really
only mathematics has a significant amount of pure maths. Geophysics is basic applied maths. Source: I studied both maths and geophysics separately.
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Shawn7108
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I'm interested in Geophysics and have Oxford down as a uni I would apply to. Do they offer a Geophysics degree?
Also, if anyone has done Earth Science at Oxford, how far do they go into Geophysics?
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Chlorophile
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(Original post by Shawn7108)
I'm interested in Geophysics and have Oxford down as a uni I would apply to. Do they offer a Geophysics degree?
Also, if anyone has done Earth Science at Oxford, how far do they go into Geophysics?
Oxford's undergraduate degree is Earth Sciences. In the first two years, you study a very broad range of areas within the earth sciences but in the last two years (or last year if you don't do the masters year) you can specialise in geophysics if you want. All of the modules available are on the Earth Sciences website. They seem to do a good amount, but if you're absolutely certain that you want to geophysics it might be better to go to a Uni that offers straight Geophysics like Imperial.

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tanyapotter
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with your ums marks i'd strongly recommend applying for natural sciences at cambridge and going down the earth sciences/geology route.


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Chlorophile
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(Original post by tanyapotter)
with your ums marks i'd strongly recommend applying for natural sciences at cambridge and going down the earth sciences/geology route.


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But I don't want to wait until Year 3 to study Earth Sciences properly ):
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Snufkin
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The Royal Meteorological Society has a list of accredited undergraduate degrees which might be a good place to start looking?

University of East Anglia
BSc (Hons) Climate Science
BSc (Hons) Meteorology and Oceanography
MSci (Hons) Meteorology and Oceanography

University of Edinburgh
BSc (Hons) Geophysics and Meteorology
BSc (Hons) Physics with Meteorology

University of Reading
BSc (Hons) Meteorology and Climate
MMet (Hons) Meteorology and Climate
BSc (Hons) Maths and Meteorology

School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds.
BSc (Hons) Meteorology and Climate Science

Plymouth University
BSc (Hons) Ocean Science
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