.raiden.
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#1
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Stonebridge
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#2
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(Original post by .raiden.)
Hey guys I was stuck on a question basically in winter the change in resistance per degree is different to the change in resistance to degree in summer? My question is would the thermistor be more suitable for measuring resistance when the change in resistance per degree is higher or lower? And why?

Thanks
What do you think? Let's bring some common sense back to physics!
If the change is resistance was very low, so small you could hardly measure it, would that be much use?
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Stonebridge
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This all goes to show that your original question is far too vague.
If you ask a vague question you will not get a detailed answer.
"Suitable" for what?
How are you measuring the resistance?
What range temperature are you measuring?
What do you mean by "change in resistance per degree is higher"?
Higher than what?
How low?

In general, you want a quantity that changes with temperature which changes by a suitably large amount so that it can be measured, and changes as steadily and uniformly as possible.
You don't want a quantity that changes erratically, unpredictably, or by too small an amount.
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Stonebridge
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#4
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(Original post by .raiden.)
If it's a thermistor thermometer combination is it suitable when change in resistance per degree is higher or lower for measuring variation in temperature. OK so smaller changes aren't suitable (summer) because not clear temperature change since resistance doesn't vary as much?
Not necessarily.

It's only a problem if the change is too small and can't be accurately measured.

What is the difference in the sensitivity (change in resistance per degree) between summer and winter?
Do you have this information?
Without it how can you answer the question?

You need to know
- the temperature - resistance characteristic of the thermistor (graph?)
- the typical winter and summer temperatures that you are measuring

The system may be perfectly fine for both summer and winter.

Maybe you could post the actual question with context that you are trying to answer.
If you are just asking a general question, I can't really say any more.
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Stonebridge
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I'm sorry to appear so obtuse but what do you (or the question) mean by "more suitable"? That is not a scientific term.
This is physics.
Is that ("suitable") actually the word used in the question?
The setup is only "unsuitable", I imagine, when it isn't able to distinguish between the degrees on the scale between 26 and 30 or -2 and 2.
From what you say it looks like the equipment is more "sensitive" in the winter as the increase in resistance per degree is greater.
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