Biology - Meiosis Watch

Emilija1996
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Hi!

Could someone please explain the process of Meiosis to me? I've looked at all of my notes and through the revision guide and I just can't understand it. It would be really be helpful if somebody explained it in a simplified way, just so I can understand the basics of it.

Thanks
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Nirgilis
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Moved to Life Science help . They may be able to help you :yep:
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Tillybop
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(Original post by Emilija1996)
Hi!

Could someone please explain the process of Meiosis to me? I've looked at all of my notes and through the revision guide and I just can't understand it. It would be really be helpful if somebody explained it in a simplified way, just so I can understand the basics of it.

Thanks
I don't know what level you are at, so I'll keep it basic. If you need the A level detail I can add this too.

Basically meiosis is when you want to make gametes (sperm and egg).

When a sperm and an egg fuse at fertilisation there will be one full set of DNA, which means that gametes need to have half of the full set of DNA.

Therefore meiosis is the process by which a body cell will divide to make gametes with half of the DNA.

Firstly the DNA will be replicated, and the cells divide, just like in mitosis.

This will create two cells, which still have a full set of DNA each.

After this the cells will divide again, but this time the DNA is not replicated. Therefore when this division occurs, half of the total DNA will be in each cell.

You create four gametes.

-------

Remember this:

+ Body cells have two versions of every gene. So technically they have two full sets of DNA - one from each parents.
+ This means that gametes contain only one version of each gene. - so they have one set, which we consider to be half of the DNA needed to make a whole body cell.
+ So gametes only contain half of the total DNA, but they still contain every single gene, they just have one of each of them.

Hope I haven't confused you at all If you need it to be more complex than this then I can add to it.
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MarkProbio
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(Original post by Emilija1996)
Hi!

Could someone please explain the process of Meiosis to me? I've looked at all of my notes and through the revision guide and I just can't understand it. It would be really be helpful if somebody explained it in a simplified way, just so I can understand the basics of it.

Thanks
It's really very similar to mitosis, especially in terms of the stages. For example in anaphase, you still have contraction of the spindle fibres and telophase ends with the reforming of the nuclear envelope.

If you can remember that meiosis I is concerned with the separation of homologous chromosomes and meiosis II is concerned with the separation of sister chromatids, you should be able to see and understand how four new daughter cells are produced.

Start with thinking about the ways in which it generates genetic variation: Crossing over of non-sister chromatids (in Prophase I) and independent assortment of homologous chromosomes (in Metaphase I) and of sister chromatids (in Metaphase II). Books are usually quite good with explaining these processes, the lack of detail about the rest is often because it's so similar to mitosis which you learnt in AS.
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