Law after medicine

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Smushy
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#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
Hey guys!,

I'd like to study law in America after I finish my medical degree. I've looked at law with senior status in the uk, but I really want to keep getting fresh perspectives.

I know it's early days, but I'm looking for advice on how to prepare, and whether I'll be an attractive applicant at all. I'm starting to save up for my extra degree now.

Has anyone else here studied a law degree after medicine/another undergraduate degree or applied for an American law school/ any american university?

Thanks a lot for any advice or personal experience!
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Smushy
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#2
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#2
Any help would be much appreciated
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Blackacre
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#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
(Original post by Smushy)
Hey guys!,

I'd like to study law in America after I finish my medical degree. I've looked at law with senior status in the uk, but I really want to keep getting fresh perspectives.

I know it's early days, but I'm looking for advice on how to prepare, and whether I'll be an attractive applicant at all. I'm starting to save up for my extra degree now.

Has anyone else here studied a law degree after medicine/another undergraduate degree or applied for an American law school/ any american university?

Thanks a lot for any advice or personal experience!
It's only been a few hours since you posted, which isn't long in "TSR Time" - don't give up hope of an answer just yet! :p:

I don't really have much to offer because I haven't studied in the US, but is there a particular reason you're interested in an American law degree? Are you considering practising abroad?
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Le Nombre
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#4
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#4
I know someone who did the JD at UCl/Columbia, main comment was that it was ****ing expensive, you'll need 100k plus for a JD at a T14 just in tuition.

Out of interest why do a JD rather than LLM or SS? It's a degree with at least one eye on practice.

I applied for undergrad but the main concern was my SAT and athletic stuff, for JD I guess you have to nail the LSAT and your undergrad GPA (guess they'll take your decile) plys have some kind of legal experience, check College Confidential.
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Smushy
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#5
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#5
(Original post by Blackacre)
It's only been a few hours since you posted, which isn't long in "TSR Time" - don't give up hope of an answer just yet! :p:

I don't really have much to offer because I haven't studied in the US, but is there a particular reason you're interested in an American law degree? Are you considering practising abroad?
I'm sorry if I'm being pushy ^.^ I'm just quite excited so I'd love to start making plans!

I'm interested in medical ethics I chose medicine as my first degree because I am passionate about doing research into neuroscience and because I want to volunteer with the Red Cross in the Middle East. I recently thought: why not both? I found out it isn't unheard of for people to do joint or separate MD JD degrees, especially if they are interested in academic/policy writing careers.

I'd like to complete a US degree because I'd like to keep travelling I want to experience different approaches towards education. I don't want to practice pure law, although I might at some point. I'm just interested in it I would like to have a career which allows me to travel, which is why I chose the US and the UK over other non-English speaking countries. The US is also well known for law, if at all possible I'd like to apply to Chicago, Harvard, Yale, Columbia etc. because these unis are internationally recognised

I am considering doing a masters in France, but I'll think about that later ^.^
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Smushy
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#6
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#6
(Original post by Le Nombre)
I know someone who did the JD at UCl/Columbia, main comment was that it was ****ing expensive, you'll need 100k plus for a JD at a T14 just in tuition.

Out of interest why do a JD rather than LLM or SS? It's a degree with at least one eye on practice.

I applied for undergrad but the main concern was my SAT and athletic stuff, for JD I guess you have to nail the LSAT and your undergrad GPA (guess they'll take your decile) plys have some kind of legal experience, check College Confidential.
Is there no financial help available? I was really hoping I could get some. If not I guess I could always take out a private loan.

I was under the impression I need a law degree to apply for an LLM course. I'm not sure what you mean by an SS degree, do you mean a two year law degree for graduates from another course like they do at Oxford? I'd be interested in that, but I'd rather go to America because I'd like to move around so to speak. I'll be spending about ten or eleven years in the UK to round off my medical degree (I'm hoping to get into the MD/PhD program at my uni) so knowing myself, I'll be eager to move somewhere else.

I've been looking at the LSAT, and from what I can tell I'll have to do lots of practice tests under timed conditions, as for my GPA I assume they'll be looking for a first? Thanks for the tip! I'll have a look at college confidential

Thank you so much for your advice! Are you currently doing law in the UK?
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Le Nombre
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Smushy)
Is there no financial help available? I was really hoping I could get some. If not I guess I could always take out a private loan.

I was under the impression I need a law degree to apply for an LLM course. I'm not sure what you mean by an SS degree, do you mean a two year law degree for graduates from another course like they do at Oxford? I'd be interested in that, but I'd rather go to America because I'd like to move around so to speak. I'll be spending about ten or eleven years in the UK to round off my medical degree (I'm hoping to get into the MD/PhD program at my uni) so knowing myself, I'll be eager to move somewhere else.

I've been looking at the LSAT, and from what I can tell I'll have to do lots of practice tests under timed conditions, as for my GPA I assume they'll be looking for a first? Thanks for the tip! I'll have a look at college confidential

Thank you so much for your advice! Are you currently doing law in the UK?
There's some from places like the Fulbright Commission but I think that's largely targeted at masters/PhD not the professional courses.

Not necessarily, if you intercalated in law I think you may be able to, you'd have to contact the colleges.

Ok, but just so you're aware the JD is partly professional, the idea is you leave and can practice as an attorney straight away, it seems a lot of money to pay for a course aspects of which will be superfluous. Yeah that's what an SS, do you not think after clinicals you'll be keen to crack on and actually be a doctor? I know a few final year medics and they're all desperate to put all the knowledge to practical use now!

I don't think medical degrees are graded are they? You just get a MBChB/MBBS and the top few sometimes get Hons depending on the uni?

I'm an LPC student.
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Smushy
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#8
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#8
(Original post by Le Nombre)
There's some from places like the Fulbright Commission but I think that's largely targeted at masters/PhD not the professional courses.

Not necessarily, if you intercalated in law I think you may be able to, you'd have to contact the colleges.

Ok, but just so you're aware the JD is partly professional, the idea is you leave and can practice as an attorney straight away, it seems a lot of money to pay for a course aspects of which will be superfluous. Yeah that's what an SS, do you not think after clinicals you'll be keen to crack on and actually be a doctor? I know a few final year medics and they're all desperate to put all the knowledge to practical use now!

I don't think medical degrees are graded are they? You just get a MBChB/MBBS and the top few sometimes get Hons depending on the uni?

I'm an LPC student.
I'll definitely look into that! I'm not sure I'll be able to use my intercalated Bsc for such an unrelated course, but I'll definitely try.

I am, but I'm hoping to gain some transferrable skills that I can apply to a career as a diplomat/a member of the UN? Perhaps Although I was hoping to get that out of my system by working for Médecins sans Frontières/the Red Cross for a year.

In that case I'll be aiming for honours and a first in my intercalated Bsc.

Are you planning to be a solicitor?
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Le Nombre
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Smushy)
I'll definitely look into that! I'm not sure I'll be able to use my intercalated Bsc for such an unrelated course, but I'll definitely try.

I am, but I'm hoping to gain some transferrable skills that I can apply to a career as a diplomat/a member of the UN? Perhaps Although I was hoping to get that out of my system by working for Médecins sans Frontières/the Red Cross for a year.

In that case I'll be aiming for honours and a first in my intercalated Bsc.

Are you planning to be a solicitor?
Can't you do the intercalation in something like Law and Ethics? I know Birmingham do something like that and they have a good health law research centre which is interdisciplinary etc., not sure if it's open to externals check their website.

Remember to work anywhere abroad you'll usually need to be fully qualified, in the UK that means doing F1. I'm not sure a JD would be the best prep for that, like I said it's primarily geared to being a practicing American lawyer, maybe something like one of the Kennedy programmes?

Yeah, start in september.
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Smushy
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#10
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#10
(Original post by Le Nombre)
Can't you do the intercalation in something like Law and Ethics? I know Birmingham do something like that and they have a good health law research centre which is interdisciplinary etc., not sure if it's open to externals check their website.

Remember to work anywhere abroad you'll usually need to be fully qualified, in the UK that means doing F1. I'm not sure a JD would be the best prep for that, like I said it's primarily geared to being a practicing American lawyer, maybe something like one of the Kennedy programmes?

Yeah, start in september.
Would a course like philosophy of medicine or medical ethics qualify? I'll see what my department says about doing my Bsc at another uni.

What is an F1?The only one I know is the student visa for America. Are you talking about the bar exam? Do you mean one of these?: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/centers-programs/programs they do look fascinating. You've certainly given me a lot to think about.

Good luck! What are you most excited about?
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Le Nombre
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Smushy)
Would a course like philosophy of medicine or medical ethics qualify? I'll see what my department says about doing my Bsc at another uni.

What is an F1?The only one I know is the student visa for America. Are you talking about the bar exam? Do you mean one of these?: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/centers-programs/programs they do look fascinating. You've certainly given me a lot to think about.

Good luck! What are you most excited about?
No Foundation Year 1, the first year if being a junior dr in the UK, a lot of continental countries do it pre graduation but here it's the year after.

By Kennedy I meant at the Kennedy School of Government, on my phone so can't hit the link.

Being paid 18 years education is enough!
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Smushy
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Le Nombre)
No Foundation Year 1, the first year if being a junior dr in the UK, a lot of continental countries do it pre graduation but here it's the year after.

By Kennedy I meant at the Kennedy School of Government, on my phone so can't hit the link.

Being paid 18 years education is enough!
I should have known! I am planning to leave the UK a fully qualified doctor, go practice abroad for a year (maybe longer if I enjoy it as much as I hope I will) with a charity and then do my law degree.

That's what I linked to, the programmes truly are fascinating. Can I only get involved if I am studying at Harvard at the time?

True Although I'd rather go back into education right now! My current salary is beyond pathetic. :'(

What got you interested in law?
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Le Nombre
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Smushy)
I should have known! I am planning to leave the UK a fully qualified doctor, go practice abroad for a year (maybe longer if I enjoy it as much as I hope I will) with a charity and then do my law degree.

That's what I linked to, the programmes truly are fascinating. Can I only get involved if I am studying at Harvard at the time?

True Although I'd rather go back into education right now! My current salary is beyond pathetic. :'(

What got you interested in law?
They run their own masters I think, not sure how much of their stuff is open to the public but I suppose you'd have to be in Boston at the time for practical reasons.

Interested in politics/current affairs so applied for the degree, liked that so decided to try practice.
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vnupe
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#14
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#14
(Original post by Le Nombre)
They run their own masters I think, not sure how much of their stuff is open to the public but I suppose you'd have to be in Boston at the time for practical reasons.

Interested in politics/current affairs so applied for the degree, liked that so decided to try practice.
Try the Extension School at Harvard, they have a myriad of course, some online others can be completed at Harvard in a month... I have included a specific link to a course subject it sounds like you will be interested in:
http://www.extension.harvard.edu/courses/law-ethics

The Extension School site is a very comprehensive site... Good Luck!
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