You seen how disgusting an autopsy is before?

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morethanafeeling
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It's absolutely gross. I saw one where the body was fully dissected, though. If they think it's cos of drugs, do they just dissect the part they think had drugs in it first? I think how they do it is total overkill and just ridiculous how they do it in some cases.

Obviously, I know why they do it and some bozo will come in saying I don't but medical people like that sometimes really overkill.
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morethanafeeling
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octoberrain
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It's horrible. I haven't ever seen one in real life (only in NCIS, CSI and things) but tbh I don't really insist on doing so...


Have a good day and may the odds be ever in your favour.
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BeanofJelly
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They are quite gruesome but the procedure exists for a reason, as you know. I wouldn't call it over kill - after careful inspection the body is always closed and cleaned in a way where the person will be presentable wearing clothes. Great care is taken to achieve that, perhaps you weren't paying attention?

Also, have some respect - you are witnessing someone's body in the very short time frame between their entire life, and their disappearance into the earth forever. That's a privileged experience even if parts of it are quite macabre.
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Rascacielos
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Overkill? Sadly we haven't found a way to examine the entirety of the human body without cutting into it yet.

I haven't seen an autopsy but I would like to (professional interest, as well as my own curiosity!). My parents were in the police so they saw quite a few, so they've told me all about it!
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Revolutionizer
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I think it's disrespectful. You cut up someone's body and leave it in shreds and in a total mess after putting it back together.

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manchesterunited15
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(Original post by Revolutionizer)
I think it's disrespectful. You cut up someone's body and leave it in shreds and in a total mess after putting it back together.

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How would you suggest we figure out how someone died, and subsequently press charges if necessary?
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_Ddraig_
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Yes.

Sadly i reached the dark depths of YouTube once where such videos exist. I don't consider it disgusting though, at least not morally. People deserve answers when their loved ones die and until another method crop up, this method seems to be able to provide those answers.
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College_Dropout
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No I havent, but I have seen men and women having the heads and limbs cut off with a various number of objects including machetes and chainsaw's while alive.
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Revolutionizer
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(Original post by manchesterunited15)
How would you suggest we figure out how someone died, and subsequently press charges if necessary?
Not like that.:facepalm:

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manchesterunited15
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(Original post by Revolutionizer)
Not like that.:facepalm:

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How then? Clearly the current way is the most effective way.
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morethanafeeling
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(Original post by BeanofJelly)
They are quite gruesome but the procedure exists for a reason, as you know. I wouldn't call it over kill - after careful inspection the body is always closed and cleaned in a way where the person will be presentable wearing clothes. Great care is taken to achieve that, perhaps you weren't paying attention?

Also, have some respect - you are witnessing someone's body in the very short time frame between their entire life, and their disappearance into the earth forever. That's a privileged experience even if parts of it are quite macabre.
That's not the case, a lot of the time.
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BeanofJelly
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(Original post by morethanafeeling)
That's not the case, a lot of the time.
Which part is not the case?

How many post mortems have you witnessed? I've seen a fair few and an effort has always been made to tidy up the person's appearance. Some go out looking better than when they came in, to tell you the truth. Making the cuts in a way which is coverable is completely standard practice from my understanding. And it is certainly illegal not to return all organs and tissues (except those absolutely necessary for specimens) to the deceased for their burial or cremation.

Essentially, someone may be a little bit jumbled up inside, but they are all there and should look the same wearing clothes.

Of course there may be lazy morticians but I have encountered only careful and respectful people who take pride in their work. If you've witnessed something to the contrary maybe you should raise that.

Not to be a complete lecturing bore, but I also think you should take care when describing post mortems to speak in respectful terms of the dead and the process.

Many of the public may have a relative or friend who needs a post mortem. This is often distressing and worrying for them (although also sometimes very comforting if it helps to clarify a cause of death). I don't think it helps to hear about people relating the experience of witnessing a post mortem in terms of how "gross" it was. You should always bear in mind that what you are witnessing is very intimate - someone's life and death laid out in bare. If gross is all you can think of, in the nicest way, I think you need to be more thoughtful.
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morethanafeeling
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(Original post by BeanofJelly)
Which part is not the case?

How many post mortems have you witnessed? I've seen a fair few and an effort has always been made to tidy up the person's appearance. Some go out looking better than when they came in, to tell you the truth. Making the cuts in a way which is coverable is completely standard practice from my understanding. And it is certainly illegal not to return all organs and tissues (except those absolutely necessary for specimens) to the deceased for their burial or cremation.

Essentially, someone may be a little bit jumbled up inside, but they are all there and should look the same wearing clothes.

Of course there may be lazy morticians but I have encountered only careful and respectful people who take pride in their work. If you've witnessed something to the contrary maybe you should raise that.

Not to be a complete lecturing bore, but I also think you should take care when describing post mortems to speak in respectful terms of the dead and the process.

Many of the public may have a relative or friend who needs a post mortem. This is often distressing and worrying for them (although also sometimes very comforting if it helps to clarify a cause of death). I don't think it helps to hear about people relating the experience of witnessing a post mortem in terms of how "gross" it was. You should always bear in mind that what you are witnessing is very intimate - someone's life and death laid out in bare. If gross is all you can think of, in the nicest way, I think you need to be more thoughtful.
I've seen one where basically everything is removed from the body except the spine. I'm allowed to say the sky is blue. Don't ask me to lie, please. I understand compassion but I also understand not being stupid and not calling BS.
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BeanofJelly
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(Original post by morethanafeeling)
I've seen one where basically everything is removed from the body except the spine.
May I ask in what context (although if it is within a health setting please remain aware of confidentiality)?

Usually most of the contents of the cranium, thorax and abdomen are removed, examined and replaced; leaving the limbs, face, and back visually inspected, but otherwise untouched. If any of those parts do need to be examined more closely, it will be for a good reason (such as trauma or disease of these parts potentially contributing to death).

The standard removal and examination of tissues and organs does not leave the person in a state unfit to be seen. The law requires that all parts (except specimens for histology) must be replaced. The person is then sewn up and washed.

If you have witnessed a dissection then this is a separate process to post mortem. In the UK, dissection takes place when a person and their relatives have given their informed consent for their body to be used in this way - usually for teaching or research purposes. Again, whilst the person may be taken apart, the process of doing so is extremely careful and laborious. Delicate, when it comes to it. I have never encountered an anatomist who does not treat the deceased persons they work upon without the utmost care and respect. Furthermore, when the person's body and/or specimens can no longer be used, again it is a legal requirement that all parts be reunited so that they can be buried or cremated. Of course in that instance, the person will not look the same - but that's what they prepared for and consented to.
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BeanofJelly
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(Original post by morethanafeeling)
Don't ask me to lie, please. I understand compassion but I also understand not being stupid and not calling BS.
I'm not asking you to lie. I'm asking you to have some consideration that you've what you've witnessed is incredibly intimate and relates to a person's death. Whilst you may find aspects difficult to stomach - that is what the human body is, alive and in death. Your experience of the process as simply "gross" isn't helpful or respectful for others to read. And members of the public who's relative or friend has undergone a post mortem, will read what you write online about the experience.

If you have had such an experience as part of a healthcare programme, remember that you are and will be accountable to the public and their perception of you and the services you partake in. Also that you should not undermine your colleagues - in this case the morticians and the work that they do to make a difficult process as dignified as possible. You will learn, young padawan. Or you won't, in which case you may find yourself in trouble.

I know that is being a boring, lecturing old fart - but I have been to many post mortems, and found myself with more thoughtful things to say about them than "gross". Even were this my sole conclusion, I would not be dashing to the internet to boast about that potentially at the expense (however anonymous) of a dead person's dignity - particularly whom I owe the debt of having witnessed their post mortem, whether I enjoyed it or hated it.

What did you expect? Yes, let's all exchange insensitive stories about the deceased and their bodies on a public forum? It isn't appropriate.
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morethanafeeling
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(Original post by BeanofJelly)
I'm not asking you to lie. I'm asking you to have some consideration that you've what you've witnessed is incredibly intimate and relates to a person's death. Whilst you may find aspects difficult to stomach - that is what the human body is, alive and in death. Your experience of the process as simply "gross" isn't helpful or respectful for others to read. And members of the public who's relative or friend has undergone a post mortem, will read what you write online about the experience.

If you have had such an experience as part of a healthcare programme, remember that you are and will be accountable to the public and their perception of you and the services you partake in. Also that you should not undermine your colleagues - in this case the morticians and the work that they do to make a difficult process as dignified as possible. You will learn, young padawan. Or you won't, in which case you may find yourself in trouble.

I know that is being a boring, lecturing old fart - but I have been to many post mortems, and found myself with more thoughtful things to say about them than "gross". Even were this my sole conclusion, I would not be dashing to the internet to boast about that potentially at the expense (however anonymous) of a dead person's dignity - particularly whom I owe the debt of having witnessed their post mortem, whether I enjoyed it or hated it.

What did you expect? Yes, let's all exchange insensitive stories about the deceased and their bodies on a public forum? It isn't appropriate.
I'll find myself in trouble?
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BeanofJelly
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(Original post by morethanafeeling)
I'll find myself in trouble?
If you are a healthcare student/professional, and you make the habit of making insensitive remarks in the pubic sphere, about privileged experiences you have had as a result of working in healthcare, then yes you may find yourself getting into trouble. So I have been advised.
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TheGreatPonderer
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Got some experience in a pathology lab before coming to med school and saw some. I thought it was pretty cool tbh


We are lucky enough (depending on your view) to work with whole cadavers so will be seeing a whole lot more dead bodies in the future!


The most interesting thing I think I saw is coagulated plasma in a guy's arm from a leaked IV.
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member403966
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No but my parents had to dissect many cadavers in Russia. My Mum said the first time she saw one she cried and was sick. She eventually got used to it though. I can't even imagine.
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