For interference patterns why is sound loudest at the centre ...

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emmalav
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For interference patterns why is sound the loudest or light the brightest at the center of the wave interferences ? Thank you very much ! And also if you were asked to describe what in phase means for sound waves why would you say that the compressions and rarefactions are emitted from both speakers at the same time , instead of saying the crests and troughs of the waves coincide with time. And would you say the same for light waves? thanks again ! :confused:
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Nirgilis
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Moved to the physics help forum . They may be more able to help you
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pillacat
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(Original post by emmalav)
why would you say that the compressions and rarefactions are emitted from both speakers at the same time , instead of saying the crests and troughs of the waves coincide with time. And would you say the same for light waves? thanks again ! :confused:


Do you know the difference between longitudinal and transverse waves? Because in longitudinal waves, (for which sound belongs) you say that the waves have areas of compression and rarefaction. More of which you can read by clicking here But you must note that ONLY longitudinal waves can be said to have these compressions and rarefactions. It would be equally OK to say the sound wave had crests and troughs. (visible) Light is part of EM spectrum, and everything on EM spec is classed as a transverse wave. So in the case of light, you could not say the same in that rarefactions and compressions are emitted from lightbulb.


(Original post by emmalav)
For interference patterns why is sound the loudest or light the brightest at the center of the wave interferences ?
You could try reading this (click here). Problem is the kind of explanation required really needs diagrams so probably better if this article with pictures explains it to you or it's hard to visualise.


Hope this helped
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emmalav
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(Original post by pillacat)
Do you know the difference between longitudinal and transverse waves? Because in longitudinal waves, (for which sound belongs) you say that the waves have areas of compression and rarefaction. More of which you can read by clicking here But you must note that ONLY longitudinal waves can be said to have these compressions and rarefactions. It would be equally OK to say the sound wave had crests and troughs. (visible) Light is part of EM spectrum, and everything on EM spec is classed as a transverse wave. So in the case of light, you could not say the same in that rarefactions and compressions are emitted from lightbulb.




You could try reading this (click here). Problem is the kind of explanation required really needs diagrams so probably better if this article with pictures explains it to you or it's hard to visualise.


Hope this helped
That's brilliant thanks so much ! I get the sound waves thing now thanks



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