Turn on thread page Beta

    Hi!

    The subject header sounds silly, but bear with me!

    When using scientific notation do the OU use American - French system or the British -
    German system?

    I've always thought a billion was 1 000 000 000 but apparently this is the American - French system.
    The British system would be 1 000 000 000 000!!!

    Anyone know? It could mess up some of my calculations!

    --

    Scott PA [email protected] o.uk

    "There are three kinds of people in this world, ones you can count on, and ones that can't count."
    Literally it would appear!

    Surely if you mean scientific notation there is no confusion?

    10E3 = 10, 000?

    "Scott PA" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> Hi![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> The subject header sounds silly, but bear with me![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> When using scientific notation do the OU use American - French system or[/q1]
    the
    [q1]> British - German system?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> I've always thought a billion was 1 000 000 000 but apparently this is the American - French[/q1]
    [q1]> system. The British system would be 1 000 000 000[/q1]
    000!!!
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Anyone know? It could mess up some of my calculations![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> --[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Scott PA [email protected] o.uk[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> "There are three kinds of people in this world, ones you can count on, and ones that can't count."[/q1]
    [q1]> Literally it would appear![/q1]

    On Wed, 30 Jan 2002 20:44:52 -0000, "Scott PA" <[email protected]> wrote:

    [q1]>Hi![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>The subject header sounds silly, but bear with me![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>When using scientific notation do the OU use American - French system or the British -[/q1]
    [q1]>German system?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>I've always thought a billion was 1 000 000 000 but apparently this is the American - French[/q1]
    [q1]>system. The British system would be 1 000 000 000 000!!![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Anyone know? It could mess up some of my calculations![/q1]

    The MU120 prep work clearly states that they now use the 'American' system - i.e. one billion =
    1000 million.

    HTH

    Julie

    The generally accepted one is a billion is 1000 million. I cannot ever remembering hearing or seeing
    one use of the term Milliard which is the English 1,000 million. Each of million, billion, trillion,
    quadrillion are 1000 times the lower one. Data used for international comparisons use 1000 million =
    1 billion, Jim

    American British German
    [q2]> > 1000 Thousand Thousand Tausend[/q2]
    (== Thousand)
    [q2]> > 10^6 Million Million[/q2]
    Million
    [q2]> > 10^9 Billion Thousand Million (or a Milliard)[/q2]
    Milliarde
    [q2]> > 10^12 Trillion Billion[/q2]
    Billion
    [q2]> > 10^15 Quadrillion Thousand Billion[/q2]
    Billiarde
    [q2]> > 10^18 Quintillion Trillion[/q2]
    "Scott PA" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> Hi![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> The subject header sounds silly, but bear with me![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> When using scientific notation do the OU use American - French system or[/q1]
    the
    [q1]> British - German system?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> I've always thought a billion was 1 000 000 000 but apparently this is the American - French[/q1]
    [q1]> system. The British system would be 1 000 000 000[/q1]
    000!!!
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Anyone know? It could mess up some of my calculations![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> --[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Scott PA [email protected] o.uk[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> "There are three kinds of people in this world, ones you can count on, and ones that can't count."[/q1]
    [q1]> Literally it would appear![/q1]

    On Fri, 1 Feb 2002 00:09:38 -0000, J O'Kane ([email protected]) said:
    [q1]>The generally accepted one is a billion is 1000 million. I cannot ever remembering hearing or[/q1]
    [q1]>seeing one use of the term Milliard which is the English 1,000 million. Each of million, billion,[/q1]
    [q1]>trillion, quadrillion are 1000 times the lower one. Data used for international comparisons use[/q1]
    [q1]>1000 million = 1 billion, Jim[/q1]

    The dreaded 'billion' debate.

    Is there an SI definition for it, is there a 'strict' definition of it for science use..

    Whilst we're on the subject actually, does anyone know what definition television and radio normally
    use when they quote figures?

    Ta-ra,

    --
    Julie Brandon, Derby, UK http://www.computergeeks.co.uk/
    ________________________________ ________________________________ ______________
    WEBCAM NEWS: Better quality, wireless, webcam in test. Feedback welcome!

    Billion = 1000,000,000 mainly for money and people counting The other one got dropped around the
    60/70s although it may still 'lurk' in some obscure areas

    Hugh Julie Brandon <[email protected] > wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> On Fri, 1 Feb 2002 00:09:38 -0000, J O'Kane ([email protected]) said:[/q1]
    [q2]> >The generally accepted one is a billion is 1000 million. I cannot ever remembering hearing or[/q2]
    [q2]> >seeing one use of the term Milliard which is the English 1,000 million. Each of million, billion,[/q2]
    [q2]> >trillion, quadrillion are 1000 times the lower one. Data used for international comparisons use[/q2]
    [q2]> >1000 million = 1 billion, Jim[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> The dreaded 'billion' debate.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Is there an SI definition for it, is there a 'strict' definition of it for science use..[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Whilst we're on the subject actually, does anyone know what definition television and radio[/q1]
    [q1]> normally use when they quote figures?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Ta-ra,[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> --[/q1]
    [q1]> Julie Brandon, Derby, UK[/q1]
    http://www.computergeeks.co.uk/
    [q1]>[/q1]
    ________________________________ ________________________________ ____________
    __
    [q1]> WEBCAM NEWS: Better quality, wireless, webcam in test. Feedback[/q1]
    welcome!

    So don't sign up contract which say you will receive one billion pound unless it is alos written in numbers.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I think that 1 billion = 10 to the power 9
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: June 8, 2003
Poll
Have you ever experienced bullying?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.