mollsbolls
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Does anybody have any notes on Enduring Love by Ian McEwan? I am seriously stressing about this book because I have none! I'm finding it quite hard to get to grips with
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crawfy
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What is it that you need notes about? For me I think the main points to remember are how McEwan uses foreshadowing in the opening chapter to imply a sudden change in Joe's life- don't have to book with me now but quotes are very easy to find even within the first couple of paragraphs, e.g. 'sprinting away from happiness' or something like that! Also,, for characterisation I tend to focus on Joe as obviously he is the most developed. The story being told from his point of view leads the reader to question him as a reliable narrator- at many points he becomes very absorbed/obsessed with his thoughts, for instance the scene in the library before he see's Jed. Sorry its quote vague but I hope it helps!
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crawfy
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This is a brief essay I wrote on the first 8 chapters last year- its not great but should give some ideas............One technique that McEwan uses effectively in the first eight chapters to tell the story is foreshadowing. For example, in the opening chapter of the book, very subtle hints are made at Joe’s unhappy future, such as ‘Sprinting away from happiness’, page 1c. At this stage, the reader doesn’t know why Joe must leave his happiness behind, and this therefore heightens their curiosity as to what is to come. In chapter two, McEwan writes ‘Everything, every gesture, every word I spoke was being stored away...fuel for the long winter of his obsession’, page 21a, and it is at this point that the reader begins to get a much better idea as to what is the source of Joes future troubles and unhappiness, but McEwan still leaves questions unanswered. This technique of foreshadowing effectively builds a very strong ominous atmosphere and a feeling of suspense, which compels the reader to keep reading, and therefore drives the narrative forward with the hints of something dramatic happening in Joe’s life.
The descriptive language that McEwan uses in chapters one and two reflect the personality of Joe, and help the reader to understand him better; something that would help them to connect with the story later in the book when Joe is in trouble. The incident of the balloon accident is described from the point of view of Joe, with very matter of fact and straightforward language. ‘When four of us let go, the balloon, with six hundred pounds shed, must have surged upwards’, page 15b, is a good example of Joe portraying the incident in a very direct way- the action was that four men let go, and by consequence the balloon rose. I think that McEwan chooses to describe the incident in this way from the point of view of Joe so that the reader can get a better understanding of his very scientific and reasonable personality. Joe is always looking for a plausible, technical reason behind everything, and tries to think of things with a rational outlook, which is reinforced by the sentence structure in this chapter of the book as well. Sentences such as ‘Jed Parry was unhurt’, and ‘Toby Greene broke his ankle’ are very short, simple and to the point. Detached from all emotion, they show only fact.
This style of writing is also found when Joe approaches the corpse of John Logan in chapter two, when the corpse is described as ‘there was no lateral spread’, and ‘the skeletal structure had collapsed internally’, page 23a. This descriptive language is simply what he saw, and why it appeared that way, not how he felt about the appearance of the corpse. In the same moment that the corpse is described, McEwan writes that Joe thinks straight to science, with ‘The closing down of countless interrelated neural and bio-chemical exchanges combined to suggest to a naked eye the illusion of the extinguished spark, or the simple departure of a single necessary element’, page 23b, shows that Science is where Joe seeks to find his escape, and his attempt to justify things he cannot understand or cope with. This is reinforced by the sentence ‘These were the thoughts with which I tried to protect myself’, and this idea of Joes sanctuary in science is later revisited in chapter four when he focuses his mind on science rather than the anxiety caused by Jed. The verb ‘tried’ is also a subtle hint that maybe Joe won’t be able to protect himself completely with science, and in the end he will have to deal with what the future will hold for him.
In chapter three, I think that one of the main narrative techniques used by McEwan is pace. As Joe and Clarissa return to their apartment and analyse the events of the day, the pace seems very slow, as the couple go over details repeatedly, such as ‘that moment... circling it, stalking it, until we had it cornered and began to tame it with words’, page 29b. The weeks that follow the accident are summarised in a few lines in this chapter, at a very fast pace of ‘over the days and weeks’. McEwan uses this narrative technique to move along the story, but I also think that it highlights the significance of the day of the accident compared to the following weeks. The fact that Joe is struggling in coming to terms with the balloon accident is shown through the very slow and detailed pace of him and Clarissa talking through the night, and this is effective in showing the first glimpses that maybe Joe’s rational and stable mental state is beginning to slip, an idea which is important to many of his future actions in the book.
The viewpoint in the book is another technique used by McEwan to tell the story of Joe and Jed. I think that this is particularly important in chapters four and five, which are entirely told from the point of view of Joe. I think that McEwan chooses to write these two chapters focused around Joe to show how caught up in his thoughts he is. By showing all of Joe’s thought processes, and the way that he frequently returns to the accident or Jed- ‘There are certain mistakes that no quantity of astronauts can right. Like mine yesterday.’ Page 39c, and ‘I had sensed him behind me even before I saw him’ 47b- suggest that these thoughts are torturing him and he doesn’t feel like he can escape them. It helps to explain why Joe reacts to the whole situation with Jed in a very negative way and not just like Clarissa, when Joe decides to tell her about the phone call.
Throughout the first eight chapters, McEwan uses both setting and relationships to show that Joe’s safe place is in his apartment with Clarissa. When they arrive home in chapter three, Joe and Clarissa are forced to return to the normality of their apartment even though everything has changed for them personally- ‘we were back home...and everything looked the same’, page 28a. The apartment helps to show the comforting life that Joe used to lead before the accident, as it is when they are in the apartment that Joe and Clarissa seem most open and comforting to each other. However, this one safe setting for Joe is soon ruined by the presence of Jed, as ‘Parry was out there, across the street where he could be seen’, page 72c. The very close relationship is also another place where Joe can find comfort, but would soon be tainted by Jed. For example, McEwan writes that Joe feels Clarissa’s return to their home after he has been alone all day ‘restores me completely’ on page 53a. This shows the impact that Clarissa can have on Joe, and how she can also be a source of reassurance for him, after telling her about the phone call from Jed ‘I felt lightened to have her teasing me’, page 57a. I think that McEwan emphasises these sources of comfort, happiness and normality for Joe so that when Jed begins to invade and ruin them, it creates a more dramatic and menacing atmosphere in comparison.
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IFoundWonderland
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http://www.gradesaver.com/enduring-l...uide/section1/
http://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/engl...t/plot-summary
http://www.studymode.com/subjects/sp...ove-page1.html

I would forward you some notes, but I make my annotations in the book..
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mollsbolls
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#5
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(Original post by crawfy)
This is a brief essay I wrote on the first 8 chapters last year- its not great but should give some ideas............One technique that McEwan uses effectively in the first eight chapters to tell the story is foreshadowing. For example, in the opening chapter of the book, very subtle hints are made at Joe’s unhappy future, such as ‘Sprinting away from happiness’, page 1c. At this stage, the reader doesn’t know why Joe must leave his happiness behind, and this therefore heightens their curiosity as to what is to come. In chapter two, McEwan writes ‘Everything, every gesture, every word I spoke was being stored away...fuel for the long winter of his obsession’, page 21a, and it is at this point that the reader begins to get a much better idea as to what is the source of Joes future troubles and unhappiness, but McEwan still leaves questions unanswered. This technique of foreshadowing effectively builds a very strong ominous atmosphere and a feeling of suspense, which compels the reader to keep reading, and therefore drives the narrative forward with the hints of something dramatic happening in Joe’s life.
The descriptive language that McEwan uses in chapters one and two reflect the personality of Joe, and help the reader to understand him better; something that would help them to connect with the story later in the book when Joe is in trouble. The incident of the balloon accident is described from the point of view of Joe, with very matter of fact and straightforward language. ‘When four of us let go, the balloon, with six hundred pounds shed, must have surged upwards’, page 15b, is a good example of Joe portraying the incident in a very direct way- the action was that four men let go, and by consequence the balloon rose. I think that McEwan chooses to describe the incident in this way from the point of view of Joe so that the reader can get a better understanding of his very scientific and reasonable personality. Joe is always looking for a plausible, technical reason behind everything, and tries to think of things with a rational outlook, which is reinforced by the sentence structure in this chapter of the book as well. Sentences such as ‘Jed Parry was unhurt’, and ‘Toby Greene broke his ankle’ are very short, simple and to the point. Detached from all emotion, they show only fact.
This style of writing is also found when Joe approaches the corpse of John Logan in chapter two, when the corpse is described as ‘there was no lateral spread’, and ‘the skeletal structure had collapsed internally’, page 23a. This descriptive language is simply what he saw, and why it appeared that way, not how he felt about the appearance of the corpse. In the same moment that the corpse is described, McEwan writes that Joe thinks straight to science, with ‘The closing down of countless interrelated neural and bio-chemical exchanges combined to suggest to a naked eye the illusion of the extinguished spark, or the simple departure of a single necessary element’, page 23b, shows that Science is where Joe seeks to find his escape, and his attempt to justify things he cannot understand or cope with. This is reinforced by the sentence ‘These were the thoughts with which I tried to protect myself’, and this idea of Joes sanctuary in science is later revisited in chapter four when he focuses his mind on science rather than the anxiety caused by Jed. The verb ‘tried’ is also a subtle hint that maybe Joe won’t be able to protect himself completely with science, and in the end he will have to deal with what the future will hold for him.
In chapter three, I think that one of the main narrative techniques used by McEwan is pace. As Joe and Clarissa return to their apartment and analyse the events of the day, the pace seems very slow, as the couple go over details repeatedly, such as ‘that moment... circling it, stalking it, until we had it cornered and began to tame it with words’, page 29b. The weeks that follow the accident are summarised in a few lines in this chapter, at a very fast pace of ‘over the days and weeks’. McEwan uses this narrative technique to move along the story, but I also think that it highlights the significance of the day of the accident compared to the following weeks. The fact that Joe is struggling in coming to terms with the balloon accident is shown through the very slow and detailed pace of him and Clarissa talking through the night, and this is effective in showing the first glimpses that maybe Joe’s rational and stable mental state is beginning to slip, an idea which is important to many of his future actions in the book.
The viewpoint in the book is another technique used by McEwan to tell the story of Joe and Jed. I think that this is particularly important in chapters four and five, which are entirely told from the point of view of Joe. I think that McEwan chooses to write these two chapters focused around Joe to show how caught up in his thoughts he is. By showing all of Joe’s thought processes, and the way that he frequently returns to the accident or Jed- ‘There are certain mistakes that no quantity of astronauts can right. Like mine yesterday.’ Page 39c, and ‘I had sensed him behind me even before I saw him’ 47b- suggest that these thoughts are torturing him and he doesn’t feel like he can escape them. It helps to explain why Joe reacts to the whole situation with Jed in a very negative way and not just like Clarissa, when Joe decides to tell her about the phone call.
Throughout the first eight chapters, McEwan uses both setting and relationships to show that Joe’s safe place is in his apartment with Clarissa. When they arrive home in chapter three, Joe and Clarissa are forced to return to the normality of their apartment even though everything has changed for them personally- ‘we were back home...and everything looked the same’, page 28a. The apartment helps to show the comforting life that Joe used to lead before the accident, as it is when they are in the apartment that Joe and Clarissa seem most open and comforting to each other. However, this one safe setting for Joe is soon ruined by the presence of Jed, as ‘Parry was out there, across the street where he could be seen’, page 72c. The very close relationship is also another place where Joe can find comfort, but would soon be tainted by Jed. For example, McEwan writes that Joe feels Clarissa’s return to their home after he has been alone all day ‘restores me completely’ on page 53a. This shows the impact that Clarissa can have on Joe, and how she can also be a source of reassurance for him, after telling her about the phone call from Jed ‘I felt lightened to have her teasing me’, page 57a. I think that McEwan emphasises these sources of comfort, happiness and normality for Joe so that when Jed begins to invade and ruin them, it creates a more dramatic and menacing atmosphere in comparison.
THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!! I'm struggling with what narrative techniques he uses throughout the book! This is so helpful btw sorry for the late reply!
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The Empire Odyssey
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#6
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I've got thi smassive booklet that my teacher gave our class it's like 150 word docu pages long on Enduring Love. I have also found a similar one that explores narrative techniques in all chapters?

Let me know if you want it
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mollsbolls
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#7
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(Original post by Cool_JordH)
I've got thi smassive booklet that my teacher gave our class it's like 150 word docu pages long on Enduring Love. I have also found a similar one that explores narrative techniques in all chapters?

Let me know if you want it
Yes please! That would be so helpful! I've PM you just now! Thank you so much
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