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    Taking a course of these antibodies from plants to treat a herpes infection would not produce long-term protection against disease. Explain why.

    Can anyone give me a clue or something? I have no idea what I'm supposed to be thinking about for this question.

    And for this one;
    Explain one advantage of using antibodies from plants to treat a disease, rather than antibodies produced in an experimental animal.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by rosie.96)
    Taking a course of these antibodies from plants to treat a herpes infection would not produce long-term protection against disease. Explain why.

    Can anyone give me a clue or something? I have no idea what I'm supposed to be thinking about for this question.

    And for this one;
    Explain one advantage of using antibodies from plants to treat a disease, rather than antibodies produced in an experimental animal.

    Thanks
    because your not actively producing the antibody's, this form of immunity is artificial and passive so you don't produce any memory cells to tackle a possible secondary encounter of the pathogen that causes the herpes infection, their fore their is no long term protection.

    an advantage? ill get back to you on that one.
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    (Original post by BasharAssad)
    because your not actively producing the antibody's, this form of immunity is artificial and passive so you don't produce any memory cells to tackle a possible secondary encounter of the pathogen that causes the herpes infection, their fore their is no long term protection.

    an advantage? ill get back to you on that one.
    Ok, Thanks
    So because antibodies are passed on, there is no primary response?
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    (Original post by rosie.96)
    Ok, Thanks
    So because antibodies are passed on, there is no primary response?
    Not quite. Normally, your own immune system keeps on randomly making antibodies and when the antibodies 'fit' the antigen, the B cells that produce that antibody proliferate (clonal selection). The B cells can form plasma cells which secrete antibody or memory cells which are very stable and stay in your body for a long time. When you get reinfected with the same antigen, the memory cells proliferate and you get a quicker adaptive immune response.

    With exogenous antibodies, you are essentially bypassing this system so will have no memory cells. So protection will only be for the period when the initial antibody remains in the blood.

    As for plant-derived antibodies - these haven't been legalised yet but trials suggest they are as effective as monoclonal antibodies produced through animals. The main advantages would be cost benefits and also providing enhanced safety by avoidance of animal viruses or other contaminants.
 
 
 
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