AQA English Literature RELATIONSHIPS CLUSTER ***OFFICIAL THREAD***

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js171
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This is for help with the relationships cluster and the unseen!
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Changing Skies
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If anyone would like any advice, I'd be happy to give it achieved an A* in this exam and I'm currently an A2 Literature student.

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ThisIsn'tSpam
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(Original post by Changing Skies)
If anyone would like any advice, I'd be happy to give it achieved an A* in this exam and I'm currently an A2 Literature student.

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Is this is where we talk about the Vittoria and Bracciano's of the literary world and how it would have been better if Camillo and Isabella had simply run off together?

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Gotta love The White Devil
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tanzeelh
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(Original post by Changing Skies)
If anyone would like any advice, I'd be happy to give it achieved an A* in this exam and I'm currently an A2 Literature student.

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How do you recommend to revise for English Literature at A level?
Any tips and tricks?
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js171
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If anyone has notes/ideas/information about: Ghazal, In Paris with you, too his coy mistress, Brothers, Sister Maude and Farmers bride would be a HUGEEEE help
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TheTopStudent
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(Original post by js171)
If anyone has notes/ideas/information about: Ghazal, In Paris with you, too his coy mistress, Brothers, Sister Maude and Farmers bride would be a HUGEEEE help
I agree, these are the most difficult/obscure poems IMO
Help would be appreciated
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JadeMay
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(Original post by js171)
If anyone has notes/ideas/information about: Ghazal, In Paris with you, too his coy mistress, Brothers, Sister Maude and Farmers bride would be a HUGEEEE help
The poems aren't too bad once you understand what they are actually about. I'll give you an example.

Brothers - The poem is about a boy spending the afternoon with his younger brother and his friend Paul, and explores the relationship between siblings. The poem contains alliteration, sibilance, metaphors and personification. The language is negative, and in some parts childish which is a contrast to phrases such as 'Olympic Gold' which suggest the older brother is quite sophisticated and grown up. The imagery of a 'threadbare field' could reflect the emptiness in the brother's relationship. You can compare this poem to Sister Maude and Harmonium.

What I've done for revision is make a poster for each poem, containing the subject, poetic techniques, language, imagery, form and tone as well as poems to compare it to. Hope this has helped!
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rich1334
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Looking at the replies on here I know I'm definitely buggered for this exam...

Better crack open the book!
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js171
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(Original post by JadeMay)
The poems aren't too bad once you understand what they are actually about. I'll give you an example.

Brothers - The poem is about a boy spending the afternoon with his younger brother and his friend Paul, and explores the relationship between siblings. The poem contains alliteration, sibilance, metaphors and personification. The language is negative, and in some parts childish which is a contrast to phrases such as 'Olympic Gold' which suggest the older brother is quite sophisticated and grown up. The imagery of a 'threadbare field' could reflect the emptiness in the brother's relationship. You can compare this poem to Sister Maude and Harmonium.

What I've done for revision is make a poster for each poem, containing the subject, poetic techniques, language, imagery, form and tone as well as poems to compare it to. Hope this has helped!
Thank you so much! The poems I listed before I dont really understand at all, and find them so difficult to compare with. Can you PM me so i could talk to you about them more?
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JadeMay
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(Original post by js171)
Thank you so much! The poems I listed before I dont really understand at all, and find them so difficult to compare with. Can you PM me so i could talk to you about them more?
Yeah sure.
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Decerto
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(Original post by Changing Skies)
If anyone would like any advice, I'd be happy to give it achieved an A* in this exam and I'm currently an A2 Literature student.

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Could you help us with Ghazal, In Paris with you, Too His Coy Mistress, Brothers, Sister Maude and The Farmer's Bride?

Thank you.
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FREYA2898
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Hi,
Does anyone have any idea which poems might come up? Also, is there any specific technique or skill you need to use to get an A*.

All help much appreciated!!
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username1389289
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I got an a* in this exam and what we were told was one of the most important things to do was talk about the story of the poem and it's message, discuss it as a whole poem not just lines or devices! Talk about themes, symbols and the message and use your knowledge of the devices, voice, structure etc to back it up. Remember the poets wrote it as a whole piece for a purpose, they weren't just sticking together some words that rhymed with some enjambement!


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ennahaspatience
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Hi, I will be watching this thread. Since I am just a lost case when it comes to the poetry exam
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js171
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(Original post by Decerto)
Could you help us with Ghazal, In Paris with you, Too His Coy Mistress, Brothers, Sister Maude and The Farmer's Bride?

Thank you.

yes please, those are the most difficult
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Peppymint
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(Original post by Changing Skies)
If anyone would like any advice, I'd be happy to give it achieved an A* in this exam and I'm currently an A2 Literature student.

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Hi! I was wondering, since you probably know the poems very well, what you would have compared to Ghazal if Ghazal had came up? I'm thinking Hour but I'd be interested to hear your views.
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NatashaG
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I can help you guys as well, I got an A* in this exam... by the way do people still use Mr Bruff's videos? The examiner's report criticised his videos this year so work of warning :O
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EastGuava
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(Original post by NatashaG)
I can help you guys as well, I got an A* in this exam... by the way do people still use Mr Bruff's videos? The examiner's report criticised his videos this year so work of warning :O
I was planning to use his videos because I've seen people recommending them, but would you say otherwise? And do you have any general tips that helped you do well?
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NatashaG
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(Original post by EastGuava)
I was planning to use his videos because I've seen people recommending them, but would you say otherwise? And do you have any general tips that helped you do well?
I watched all his videos and they certainly helped with understanding different interpretations but you have to be careful and not base your entire essay around them because the exam board clearly didn't like it!
Here's what they said specifically about his videos!
Another feature of responses to this poem was once again the ubiquitous ‘turning the poem on its side’, leading to some very odd comments about phallic imagery. There were also a good deal of candidates who talked about Shakespeare’s ‘homosexuality’ which led to some arguing the case for both ‘Sonnet 116’ and ‘Hour’ being about homosexual love having to be hidden from society. In several schools, this idea was augmented by comments about the sailing metaphor in ‘Sonnet 116’ and how this was evidence to prove that the poem was about homosexual love, as ‘all sailors were known to be gay in those times’. It might be worth pointing out to students that many of these ‘interpretations’ appear to have ideas in common with those expressed within increasingly prevalent digital media tutorials. Whilst there is always a place for high-quality resources designed to enable candidates to think independently and explore ideas about the poems, allowing external sources to take precedence over the more balanced interpretations offered by good English teachers (and indeed the students themselves) has to be tempered. Placing total reliance upon sites such as these for an interpretation of the poems is not helpful to candidates, especially when the interpretation offered therein is at best reductive, and at worst simply wrong.

I suggest you create a kind of chart where you map out all the major themes/ or techniques in the poems and see where there are links or contrasts within the anthology. Discuss what you think the poems mean with friends and family and try to teach the meanings to others...also plan plan plan PLAN essays the best way in my opinion to practice for exams is not to write the entire essay, which of course is still helpful, but to plan like 10 + essays and write 2 or 3 to a high quality to get in some good practice...but the key is planning and the thought process that goes into creating an essay...you will remember more points by planning an essay than writing one anyway because you will have thought deeply about all the points!
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EastGuava
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(Original post by NatashaG)
I watched all his videos and they certainly helped with understanding different interpretations but you have to be careful and not base your entire essay around them because the exam board clearly didn't like it!
Here's what they said specifically about his videos!
Another feature of responses to this poem was once again the ubiquitous ‘turning the poem on its side’, leading to some very odd comments about phallic imagery. There were also a good deal of candidates who talked about Shakespeare’s ‘homosexuality’ which led to some arguing the case for both ‘Sonnet 116’ and ‘Hour’ being about homosexual love having to be hidden from society. In several schools, this idea was augmented by comments about the sailing metaphor in ‘Sonnet 116’ and how this was evidence to prove that the poem was about homosexual love, as ‘all sailors were known to be gay in those times’. It might be worth pointing out to students that many of these ‘interpretations’ appear to have ideas in common with those expressed within increasingly prevalent digital media tutorials. Whilst there is always a place for high-quality resources designed to enable candidates to think independently and explore ideas about the poems, allowing external sources to take precedence over the more balanced interpretations offered by good English teachers (and indeed the students themselves) has to be tempered. Placing total reliance upon sites such as these for an interpretation of the poems is not helpful to candidates, especially when the interpretation offered therein is at best reductive, and at worst simply wrong.

I suggest you create a kind of chart where you map out all the major themes/ or techniques in the poems and see where there are links or contrasts within the anthology. Discuss what you think the poems mean with friends and family and try to teach the meanings to others...also plan plan plan PLAN essays the best way in my opinion to practice for exams is not to write the entire essay, which of course is still helpful, but to plan like 10 + essays and write 2 or 3 to a high quality to get in some good practice...but the key is planning and the thought process that goes into creating an essay...you will remember more points by planning an essay than writing one anyway because you will have thought deeply about all the points!
Oh right, that was very useful to know. Thankyou!
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