GMT
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Hello,
I'm going to resit an AS subject in May (I'm currently doing my A2's this May) to try and improve my chances of meeting the grade requirements (of that subject) for my universities.
I already applied and recieved an answer form all my unis, it won't be long before I choose my firm and insurance.

When I sent my application I didn't know I was going to resit this subject, so I didn't put it / mention it on my ucas application (as pending).
Therefore I would like to know:
1. Should I contact my universities to inform them of my resit?
2. If so, how?
3. Can they and are they allowed to then change their offers? (For example: reject me, or worsen their grade requirements???)
4. If they can, would it be better to choose my firm and insurance (and put them on ucas) before contacting them to tell them about my resit? If so, why?
5. What would you advise me to do?

I'd appreciate some answers please
Thanks alot, this is actually driving me nuts!


GMT
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GMT
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Lasershark
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You need to phone all the universities and inform them, and yes they can change or withdraw their offers. One of the unwritten conditions of your offers might have been not resitting anything, as some universities don't like it when students resit A-Level exams. They will know, as when your results are sent to UCAS, the dates of all the exams you have taken this year will be sent to them and they will see the resit.

Do not firm and insure and then tell them, because you will have officially confirmed the lie that you're not resitting and it will be a lot worse for you. What may have been going through their heads was that you'd do so well in the A2 units (which may be more relevant to the degree than the AS units) that you wouldn't resit anything, because you'd do better on the units you can apply more to their degree. By resitting, you're saying you're most probably not going to get extremely high marks in the A2 units, you're just trying to bump up your overall grade.

In terms of how to do it, you just need to phone each university's admission office and ask to speak to somebody concerning your application, with your UCAS number to hand, etc.
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GMT
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(Original post by Lasershark)
You need to phone all the universities and inform them, and yes they can change or withdraw their offers. One of the unwritten conditions of your offers might have been not resitting anything, as some universities don't like it when students resit A-Level exams. They will know, as when your results are sent to UCAS, the dates of all the exams you have taken this year will be sent to them and they will see the resit.

Do not firm and insure and then tell them, because you will have officially confirmed the lie that you're not resitting and it will be a lot worse for you. What may have been going through their heads was that you'd do so well in the A2 units (which may be more relevant to the degree than the AS units) that you wouldn't resit anything, because you'd do better on the units you can apply more to their degree. By resitting, you're saying you're most probably not going to get extremely high marks in the A2 units, you're just trying to bump up your overall grade.

In terms of how to do it, you just need to phone each university's admission office and ask to speak to somebody concerning your application, with your UCAS number to hand, etc.
Ok, I've already been put in for the resit.
Do you think it might be better to email the universities before firming any, and in the case my favourite uni doesnt want me to resit... then could I just not take the exam? (would that count as "not resitting" even if I pay the exam)
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Lasershark
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(Original post by GMT)
Ok, I've already been put in for the resit.
Do you think it might be better to email the universities before firming any, and in the cas my favourite uni doesnt want me to resit... then could I just not take the exam? (would that count as "not resitting" even if I pay the exam)
Don't email, phone. Emails take days to get read and take longer to get replies to. Phone them, get the name of who you speak to, and the date and time of the call.

You really shouldn't have put in for a resit without asking them first, because now you'll probably get a result of X for the resit if you don't do it, still giving you an official result because you've been officially entered.
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GMT
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(Original post by Lasershark)
Don't email, phone. Emails take days to get read and take longer to get replies to. Phone them, get the name of who you speak to, and the date and time of the call.

You really shouldn't have put in for a resit without asking them first, because now you'll probably get a result of X for the resit if you don't do it, still giving you an official result because you've been officially entered.
And what does an official result of X mean?
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Lasershark
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(Original post by GMT)
And what does an official result of X mean?
X means you were entered for the exam but did not attend. It means that an entry was made for you, i.e. choosing to re-sit, but you didn't go. You had the intent of resitting the exam without asking the universities first, but for whatever reason, decided not to in the end. It is a result which will be automatically sent to the universities by UCAS, along with all of your other results.

It will still flag up as a resit which the universities were not informed about when they made their offer decisions, so they will still be within their rights to change or withdraw their offers.
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(Original post by Lasershark)
X means you were entered for the exam but did not attend. It means that an entry was made for you, i.e. choosing to re-sit, but you didn't go. You had the intent of resitting the exam without asking the universities first, but for whatever reason, decided not to in the end. It is a result which will be automatically sent to the universities by UCAS, along with all of your other results.

It will still flag up as a resit which the universities were not informed about when they made their offer decisions, so they will still be within their rights to change or withdraw their offers.
Ok, I think I get it now. So I've definitely made a mistake.

What would you advise me to do now?
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(Original post by GMT)
Ok, I think I get it now. So I've definitely made a mistake.

What would you advise me to do now?
Your only option is to phone each admissions department from each university you have an offer from, and explain the situation to them. If you say nothing they will find out on results day and by then you will be in a far worse situation if they decide to cancel their offers. You need to ask what their policy is on resits in general and what their policy is on undeclared resits, like the one you have been entered for. It will then be up to them to decide on what to do.

It's likely the whole thing won't matter, but it can matter so you need to sort it out now before it's too late and you're left with no university to go to on results day.
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(Original post by Lasershark)
Your only option is to phone each admissions department from each university you have an offer from, and explain the situation to them. If you say nothing they will find out on results day and by then you will be in a far worse situation if they decide to cancel their offers. You need to ask what their policy is on resits in general and what their policy is on undeclared resits, like the one you have been entered for. It will then be up to them to decide on what to do.

It's likely the whole thing won't matter, but it can matter so you need to sort it out now before it's too late and you're left with no university to go to on results day.

Perhaps is it better to email them, as it means I'd have a "proof" of their answer?
As well as, it avoids me getting a bit nervous
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(Original post by GMT)
Perhaps is it better to email them, as it means I'd have a "proof" of their answer?
As well as, it avoids me getting a bit nervous
I'd still phone them, because it would show them you're being proactive about the situation instead of writing an email, then burying your head in the sand until you get a reply. You could ask for email confirmation from whoever you speak to on the phone, to make sure you have proof.

If you phone them you can have it done in a couple of hours, rather than two weeks if you email. I know it can be daunting talking to strangers on the phone, but you're going to university and in adult life you're always going to have to do things you're uncomfortable with.
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(Original post by Lasershark)
I'd still phone them, because it would show them you're being proactive about the situation instead of writing an email, and then burying your head in the sand until you get a reply. You could ask for email confirmation from whoever you speak to on the phone, to make sure you have proof.

If you phone them you can have it done in an hour, rather than two weeks if you email. I know it can be daunting talking to strangers on the phone, but you're going to university and in adult life you're always going to have to do things you're uncomfortable with.

Do you think they will send me a confirmation via email?
I suspect they'll just don't care and not bother sending it

Sorry to insist, I'm grateful, and I'd like to thenkyou alot, you've given me a clear guidance on what to do, which I hope will help me try and "solve" this "problem" (I must admit it has put me nervous )
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(Original post by GMT)
Do you think they will send me a confirmation via email?
I suspect they'll just don't care and not bother sending it

Sorry to insist, I'm grateful, and I'd like to thenkyou alot, you've given me a clear guidance on what to do, which I hope will help me try and "solve" this "problem" (I must admit it has put me nervous )
If it were me I'd ask them to send confirmation while I was still on the phone, or if that was not possible, have it sent in less than 24 hours. If you don't have it after 24 hours then phone again and ask to speak to the same person.

Try not to be too nervous about it; it probably doesn't matter. It just can matter sometimes and you don't want to be faced with this problem on results day with the possibility that it did matter.
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