Don't have a UG in Economics - PgDip or Msc?

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ElmoT
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I'm going to graduate this summer with most likely a 2:1 in Financial Mathematics. Although I'm preeeeetty sure I meet the mathematical and statistical requirements for an MSc, most require you to have an economics UG, since they need you to have done some basic economics modules.

My question is this:

What is the most practical route for me? PgDip (in order to prepare for the MSc) or would my mathematical knowledge suffice in getting on to an MSc?

Thanks!
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redferry
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(Original post by ElmoT)
I'm going to graduate this summer with most likely a 2:1 in Financial Mathematics. Although I'm preeeeetty sure I meet the mathematical and statistical requirements for an MSc, most require you to have an economics UG, since they need you to have done some basic economics modules.

My question is this:

What is the most practical route for me? PgDip (in order to prepare for the MSc) or would my mathematical knowledge suffice in getting on to an MSc?

Thanks!
Kent, LSE and Nottingham offer two year MSc courses for those who don't have Economics as an u dergraduate

Its worth applying for some one year courses - the one at Royal Holloway definitely takes people without economics
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ElmoT
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Thanks for the reply!

Nottingham is definitely one I've been looking at for MSc and PgDip, although I am more preferential towards one year courses - but if I did a PgDip + 1year MSc then it'd be two years anyway.

Nice to know they take people who don't have economics UG though, wasn't sure if they did originally.
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sj27
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Your maths knowledge might suffice at some unis but there is something to be said for actually doing some economics courses first...as much as some unis try pretend that an msc in economics is basically just a kind of maths degree, there are others who state that they have noticed a distinct disadvantage with people who come in with maths only and then have to catch up on the knowledge that others already have (in both economic theory and econometrics) at the same time as doing everything else. So it may just be in your own best interests to do a GDE + Msc or do one of the two-year masters programs.
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redferry
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(Original post by ElmoT)
Thanks for the reply!

Nottingham is definitely one I've been looking at for MSc and PgDip, although I am more preferential towards one year courses - but if I did a PgDip + 1year MSc then it'd be two years anyway.

Nice to know they take people who don't have economics UG though, wasn't sure if they did originally.
Yeah my boyfriend is hoping to do an economics masters from a maths undergraduate so we've been looking into it a lot

Also if you aren't dead set on straight economics often econometrics masters seem to be happy to take mathematicians.
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Tcannon
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With a Financial Mathematics background, some unis may accept you into their MSc programmes, particularly the quant heavy courses such as MSc Financial Economics, Econometics and general Econ. Top ranked one year MSc econ (UCL, LSE, Bristol) accept people with Maths background. Given some of their coursework and reading list, maths grads do well.
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sj27
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(Original post by Tcannon)
With a Financial Mathematics background, some unis may accept you into their MSc programmes, particularly the quant heavy courses such as MSc Financial Economics, Econometics and general Econ. Top ranked one year MSc econ (UCL, LSE, Bristol) accept people with Maths background. Given some of their coursework and reading list, maths grads do well.
Don't know about the other two but LSE specifically say applicants without undergrad economics need to apply to the two year course.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/study/graduate/...Economics.aspx
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redferry
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(Original post by sj27)
Don't know about the other two but LSE specifically say applicants without undergrad economics need to apply to the two year course.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/study/graduate/...Economics.aspx
Yeah that's what they told my bf whose a maths grad - its pretty set in stone
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sj27
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(Original post by redferry)
Yeah that's what they told my bf whose a maths grad - its pretty set in stone
I was looking into this for a friend a couple of years ago. I'm trying to remember which uni it was that was very reluctant to take non-eco undergrads into their one-year course - their experience had been that no matter how well they had done in undergrad, they generally struggled with the workload because they basically had to learn a chunk of undergrad eco at the same time as doing everything else. When the lecturers are teaching macro/micro/econometrics they will assume people have done a certain level at undergrad and not tailor the work or the lectures to those who haven't.
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redferry
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(Original post by sj27)
I was looking into this for a friend a couple of years ago. I'm trying to remember which uni it was that was very reluctant to take non-eco undergrads into their one-year course - their experience had been that no matter how well they had done in undergrad, they generally struggled with the workload because they basically had to learn a chunk of undergrad eco at the same time as doing everything else. When the lecturers are teaching macro/micro/econometrics they will assume people have done a certain level at undergrad and not tailor the work or the lectures to those who haven't.
Pretty sure its UCL.
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ElmoT
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Everyone's been pretty helpful so far! So thank you.

I've sent around a few emails to universities asking if a economics degree is specifically needed - does anybody know of other universities masters course where this definitely isn't the case? (apart from LSE's 2 year MSc)
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poohat
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Why do you want to do a MSc in economics?

If you want to do a PhD afterwards then it is advisable to go for the best program possible and so I would only be looking at places like Nottingham if you couldnt get on the 2 year LSE/UCL/Oxbridge courses. Thats not to say you couldnt get into a top PhD program with a Bristol/Nottingham degree, but you would really want to get a distinction.

If you want to use the MSc to improve your CV by getting a better brand name university on it, the same applies. Bristol/Nottingham would be a good choice if you went somewhere low-tier for undergrad since that would be a step up, but if you were somewhere decent then again going for LSE/UCL/Oxbridge would be a better idea even if that means doing an extra year.

If you think that having a MSc in economics from a similar tier universitiy to your undergrad will help you get a good private sector job, I would be sceptical.
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redferry
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(Original post by ElmoT)
Everyone's been pretty helpful so far! So thank you.

I've sent around a few emails to universities asking if a economics degree is specifically needed - does anybody know of other universities masters course where this definitely isn't the case? (apart from LSE's 2 year MSc)
Royal Holloway

Would you mind letting me know how you get on? My boyfriends still interested so it would be good to know of you discover anywhere that I haven't looked into
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ElmoT
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(Original post by poohat)
Why do you want to do a MSc in economics?

If you want to do a PhD afterwards then it is advisable to go for the best program possible and so I would only be looking at places like Nottingham if you couldnt get on the 2 year LSE/UCL/Oxbridge courses. Thats not to say you couldnt get into a top PhD program with a Bristol/Nottingham degree, but you would really want to get a distinction.

If you want to use the MSc to improve your CV by getting a better brand name university on it, the same applies. Bristol/Nottingham would be a good choice if you went somewhere low-tier for undergrad since that would be a step up, but if you were somewhere decent then again going for LSE/UCL/Oxbridge would be a better idea even if that means doing an extra year.

If you think that having a MSc in economics from a similar tier universitiy to your undergrad will help you get a good private sector job, I would be sceptical.
If I'm honest, a bit of both. Bristol/Nottingham would be a step up for me in terms of university reputation and the main aim of it would to improve job prospects (secondarily, I'm very interested in economics, but I guess that goes without saying). In the longer term, however, I'm open to doing a PhD further down the line if a) the opportunity arises b) time and money allow.
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ElmoT
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(Original post by redferry)
Royal Holloway

Would you mind letting me know how you get on? My boyfriends still interested so it would be good to know of you discover anywhere that I haven't looked into
Putting pressure on me to remember to come back here if I find something out but hopefully I'll remember and let you know
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redferry
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(Original post by ElmoT)
Putting pressure on me to remember to come back here if I find something out but hopefully I'll remember and let you know
Haha its not a major issue, just might help others in your position in future!!!
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ElmoT
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(Original post by redferry)
Haha its not a major issue, just might help others in your position in future!!!
Yeah I know I was just messing around! Obviously if I can help some other people with this thread then great
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