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flashman
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#21
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#21
(Original post by leggemeister)
According to my RAF liason officer, u should be applying for 6th scholarship after ur gcse's and universirty scholarship a long time before. And yes, if you fail fast jet training u will be re-streamed. However u are already streamed at the start, so all pilots dont fly fast jet.

Hope that helps
Are you sure you're supposed to apply for university sponsorships before GCSEs? That means people would be applying at the age of 15/16. Seems a bit weird to me.
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Rhys
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#22
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#22
im sitting my A-levels at the mo..
i'm goin to AFCO after they finish to apply for a pilot scholarship..if its to late so be it, i'll apply for the following year.
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Fledge
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#23
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#23
You can apply for sponsorship while doing your a levels and receive up to £2,000 a year during college and up £5,000 a year at Uni
The amount depends on chosen field. Southampton Loughborough and Newcastle are some of R.A.f linked unis I know of
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Wzz
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#24
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#24
(Original post by flashman)
That reminds me; i've been watching that 'combat pilot' series on BBC2 every monday and was interested to know, when a trainee pilot is "axed" from the fast jet course at RAF valley because they aren't making the grade, can they get re-streamed to say rotary-wing or multi-engine, or is that it for their career as a pilot?
Depends, every case is individual. If you've given it your all, worked damn hard, and just couldn't make the grade, then chances are they'll pat you on the back, thank you for coming and send you off to multis.

If you're a bit of an idiot, couldn't be arsed working, and weren't much of a good bloke, then you're probably staring down the reselection barrell.
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Wzz
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Rhys)
Would you say that blunties are those joining a UAS with no pilot scholarship?
Blunties are all non-aircrew.
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Wzz
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#26
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#26
(Original post by flashman)
Well I think you can get a university sponsorship for other branches than pilot ( as Wzz says in post #3 of this thread) so you dont have to be a pilot applicant to get a scholorship and be in a UAS. So basically there could be someone on a scholorship who is going into a branch such as intelligence or engineering officer. However you are correct in saying that people with no scholarship or anything can get into a UAS if they are eligible.
Stop calling them scholarships! They're bursaries.
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Wzz
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#27
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#27
(Original post by flashman)
Wzz- I was wondering, are university bursary applicants only really likely to succeed if they have done extremely well in their passed exams? are the RAF only looking for very studious and academic people or do they take the attitude that if your mature and intelligent enough but have only achieved quiet good results they'll give you a shot?
No, as long as you have a reason for any mediocre results they'll be happy. If you're, well, stupid, you'll struggle; but if you sat exams you didn't enjoy, subjects that weren't your thing, had a bad time at school, etc etc then as long as you explain it and seem an intelligent chap you'll be fine.

If you aced GCSEs and flunked A levels, be prepared for a grilling why, etc.
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flashman
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#28
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#28
I wonder if anyone could tell me how the RAF view AS/A level choices? Do they mind if your not doing maths or physics or other very academic subjects? What attitude do they take to an applicant doing things like history or politics or philosophy and the like? Also in RAF application circles what is meant by the term "a mickey mouse degree"?
thanks.
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Rhys
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#29
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#29
(Original post by flashman)
I wonder if anyone could tell me how the RAF view AS/A level choices? Do they mind if your not doing maths or physics or other very academic subjects? What attitude do they take to an applicant doing things like history or politics or philosophy and the like? Also in RAF application circles what is meant by the term "a mickey mouse degree"?
thanks.
Mickey mouse is'nt an easy degree but a pointless degree that doesnt require any thinking. Thats how i see it anyway. They may want to know why you chose say A-level Art, Food studies and Media as they seem mickey mouse compared to A-level Maths, Physics/ Chemistry and English.
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flashman
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#30
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#30
(Original post by Rhys)
Mickey mouse is'nt an easy degree but a pointless degree that doesnt require any thinking. Thats how i see it anyway. They may want to know why you chose say A-level Art, Food studies and Media as they seem mickey mouse compared to A-level Maths, Physics/ Chemistry and English.
What just art, food studies and media specifically? what about things like politics and philosophy? what I meant was are they only really interested in people who are really into mathamatical and scientific subjects?i.e extremely academic people.
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Rhys
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#31
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#31
(Original post by flashman)
What just art, food studies and media specifically? what about things like politics and philosophy? what I meant was are they only really interested in people who are really into mathamatical and scientific subjects?i.e extremely academic people.
Regardless of your grades if you have the aptitude and they think your the right person for job then A-level are 'not really' important. However if you have say three A-levels at grades EEE they may think you dont put the effort in, cant make a commitment, are not determined enough etc. which will obviously effect there decision about you.
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Wzz
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Rhys)
Im going to university in september (if all goes well with exams) and am interested in applying for a pilot scholarship. Do you know if the deadline for returning applications has passed? I suppose you contact your AFCO to apply. Do you know the proccess involved in applying?
The pilot scholarship is designed for guys who want to go straight in after school. If you want to go to university, you're looking at a university bursary. Don't mistake the two awards, or you'll be surprised when you get the wrong thing
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Wzz
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#33
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#33
(Original post by flashman)
Are you sure you're supposed to apply for university sponsorships before GCSEs? That means people would be applying at the age of 15/16. Seems a bit weird to me.
Apply for university sponsorship when you're applying to uni; get the papers in when you fill out your UCAS forms. I applied pretty much exactly a year before going to uni.

During your GCSEs you can apply for 6th form scholarships.
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Wzz
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Fledge)
You can apply for sponsorship while doing your a levels and receive up to £2,000 a year during college and up £5,000 a year at Uni
The amount depends on chosen field. Southampton Loughborough and Newcastle are some of R.A.f linked unis I know of
There are no RAF linked universities. You *must* attend your nearest UAS, so if you go to something like Inverness then you're going to have to travel at least once a week to RAF Leuchars, for example. So it's worth bearing in mind how far you'll have to go.
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Wzz
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#35
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#35
(Original post by flashman)
I wonder if anyone could tell me how the RAF view AS/A level choices? Do they mind if your not doing maths or physics or other very academic subjects? What attitude do they take to an applicant doing things like history or politics or philosophy and the like? Also in RAF application circles what is meant by the term "a mickey mouse degree"?
thanks.
One that you may as well get free in a cracker. They like to see people work hard and apply themselves, so doing physics, engineering, modern history, English literature, maths etc is going to look a LOT better than applying for media studies, cookery, computer games development, etc etc. It doesn't have to be scientific, it just has to be a "proper" traditional academic subject.

That said, if you want to do computer games development, apply for it; but you'll have to be prepared to defend its worth as a degree.

I should imagine politics and philosophy will be fine.
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Wzz
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Rhys)
Regardless of your grades if you have the aptitude and they think your the right person for job then A-level are 'not really' important. However if you have say three A-levels at grades EEE they may think you dont put the effort in, cant make a commitment, are not determined enough etc. which will obviously effect there decision about you.
A level grades are very important. They show how you apply yourself and are the only evidence the RAF has about how you take on a course of training, how you work over a period of time, and how well you can study when things aren't going your way. There're a lot of parralels between that and flying training, for example.

If you get crap A levels and say you just didn't like the subject, does that mean you won't put the effort in if you don't enjoy (say) low level flying? If you "lost interest" will you be giving up and asking for a rebranch after £3M of training? If extra curricular studies got in the way of the most important exams of your life so far, what evidence do the RAF have that you're going to stick anything out with them?
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Wzz
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#37
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#37
(Original post by flashman)
You can always go to university then apply for a bursary in your first year I think.
Certainly can. You can apply at any stage.
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flashman
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#38
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#38
Can you be sponsored for a non-commissioned aircrew place? The RAF website is a bit confusing, there is a list of things which you can be sponsored for and there are a few things which aren't there which I would have thought would be there.
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Wzz
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#39
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#39
(Original post by flashman)
Can you be sponsored for a non-commissioned aircrew place? The RAF website is a bit confusing, there is a list of things which you can be sponsored for and there are a few things which aren't there which I would have thought would be there.
No. As an NCO a degree isn't considered beneficial. It's meant to show that officers have "trainable minds" and the ability to take in long courses of training; so all sponsorship leads to a commission.
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Nikki J S
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#40
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#40
As I'm new to this site I wondered if anyone could help me.

I've just finished my GCSE's and have started my application to apply for a sixth form scholarship for medical officer. I'm attending a presentation on the 26th Aug (GCSE results day!!) and I'd like some advice about the filter interview. What kind of things am I likley to be asked?

I've done quite a bit of reading up around the role/career structures of medical officers, have had work experience at RAF Coltishall, and Linton-On-Ouse med centres, and have been in ATC for 2yrs - so have a reasonable knowledge of RAF. What else might be expected?l
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