ForgottenApple
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I don't understand why the charge carriers moving through the electrolyte to the positive terminal of the battery are positive ions, shouldn't they be negative ions? If you need the question it's 2. a) ii) January 2011 G482 OCR
0
reply
Stonebridge
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
(Original post by ForgottenApple)
I don't understand why the charge carriers moving through the electrolyte to the positive terminal of the battery are positive ions, shouldn't they be negative ions? If you need the question it's 2. a) ii) January 2011 G482 OCR
A battery moves (via its chemical reactions) positive charges onto one terminal and negative onto the other. That's why the terminals are positive and negative. The one where the positive charges gather is called the positive terminal.
Passing a current through an electrolyte is a differtent story.
Here you apply (from outside) a pd to the liquid and the negative ions are attracted to the positive electrode.
In a battery there is no applied pd from outside, the battery creates its own pd at the terminals by pushing the charges there itself.
0
reply
ForgottenApple
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by Stonebridge)
A battery moves (via its chemical reactions) positive charges onto one terminal and negative onto the other. That's why the terminals are positive and negative. The one where the positive charges gather is called the positive terminal.
Passing a current through an electrolyte is a differtent story.
Here you apply (from outside) a pd to the liquid and the negative ions are attracted to the positive electrode.
In a battery there is no applied pd from outside, the battery creates its own pd at the terminals by pushing the charges there itself.
How can I identify which one it's asking for then?
0
reply
Stonebridge
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by ForgottenApple)
How can I identify which one it's asking for then?
Sorry I don't have the question.
Surely it's either referring to a chemical cell/battery (source of emf) or an electrolyte?
What does the question actually say?
If you can post it here we can help.
0
reply
ForgottenApple
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
Name:  7fc8010c77ed4b1abb2c1bb993cfa5ed.png
Views: 258
Size:  29.3 KB
0
reply
Stonebridge
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
It's a battery/cell. The question says this.
The liquid is referred to as an electrolyte as it contains ions.
As I said in an earlier post, if it's a battery (any source of emf) and this most certainly is, then the mechanism is that the terminals are positive or negative because the chemistry of the cell pushes positive or negative charges onto them.
In a cell which has emf the emf is what pushes the charges onto the plates. It's an internal force.
In the case where you apply a pd to a liquid in a jar, the pd is external and the charges move in response to the externally applied electric field.
0
reply
langlitz
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
You may find this helpful http://chemistry.about.com/library/weekly/aa082003a.htm
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

If you don't put your camera on in online lessons, why is that?

My teacher doesn't want us to (16)
17.98%
No one else does (30)
33.71%
I'm embarrassed about my background (10)
11.24%
I feel self-conscious showing my face (28)
31.46%
We don't use a video platform (2)
2.25%
I don't have a camera (2)
2.25%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (1)
1.12%

Watched Threads

View All