A level Chemistry

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sparklingTurkey
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#1
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#1
Hi, at them moment I am doing my GCSE's but because I didn't have any idea on what i wanted to do in yr9 I didn't choose to do separate sciences, so now I do additional applied science which is completely useless and irrelevant to science at A level. I know it will be harder as I haven't been taught as much, but is there anything I could do to make it easier? Has anyone else done separate sciences at A level and not GCSE?
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BeautifulPotato
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#2
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(Original post by sparklingTurkey)
Hi, at them moment I am doing my GCSE's but because I didn't have any idea on what i wanted to do in yr9 I didn't choose to do separate sciences, so now I do additional applied science which is completely useless and irrelevant to science at A level. I know it will be harder as I haven't been taught as much, but is there anything I could do to make it easier? Has anyone else done separate sciences at A level and not GCSE?
I did double award at GCSE and then biology and chemistry separately at A level. No real problem
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Dingo749
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I don't know if this is the case for all exam boards, or the exam board you may be doing it on, but I know on AQA, the board I did Chemistry with, that Unit 1 is a small and simple module.

Completely designed to bring everyone up to speed with basic chemistry, moles, organic chemistry, atoms and the periodic table. It is literally called Foundation Chemistry So hopefully this allows you to get to grips with Chemistry and will help you enjoy it
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sparklingTurkey
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#4
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(Original post by BeautifulPotato)
I did double award at GCSE and then biology and chemistry separately at A level. No real problem
Nice! are you still doing your A levels or have you finished now?

(Original post by Dingo749)
I don't know if this is the case for all exam boards, or the exam board you may be doing it on, but I know on AQA, the board I did Chemistry with, that Unit 1 is a small and simple module.

Completely designed to bring everyone up to speed with basic chemistry, moles, organic chemistry, atoms and the periodic table. It is literally called Foundation Chemistry So hopefully this allows you to get to grips with Chemistry and will help you enjoy it
That sounds really good then , would you say it would worth looking at some of the gcse chemistry or does the first unit explain it all?

And are you guys looking at doing a degree or something with chemistry or science in general?
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BeautifulPotato
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#5
(Original post by sparklingTurkey)
Nice! are you still doing your A levels or have you finished now?


That sounds really good then , would you say it would worth looking at some of the gcse chemistry or does the first unit explain it all?

And are you guys looking at doing a degree or something with chemistry or science in general?
I finished biology last year but I'm actually revising for chemistry right now! haha! It's really good fun at A level and all you need to do is be prepared to understand new concepts and accept that GCSE knowledge is very simplified. But just approach it with a clear mind and you'll do well
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Dingo749
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#6
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(Original post by sparklingTurkey)
Nice! are you still doing your A levels or have you finished now?


That sounds really good then , would you say it would worth looking at some of the gcse chemistry or does the first unit explain it all?

And are you guys looking at doing a degree or something with chemistry or science in general?
It might be worth looking at moles (Essentially a unit of measurement), atoms and bonding Just to get a brief starting point But the first unit is pretty nice and simple to bring you in nicely I'm not doing a chemistry degree, I'm in year 13 and study Chemistry at the moment and will be going on to study Maths
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William Turtle
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#7
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#7
(Original post by sparklingTurkey)
Hi, at them moment I am doing my GCSE's but because I didn't have any idea on what i wanted to do in yr9 I didn't choose to do separate sciences, so now I do additional applied science which is completely useless and irrelevant to science at A level. I know it will be harder as I haven't been taught as much, but is there anything I could do to make it easier? Has anyone else done separate sciences at A level and not GCSE?
You say 'applied science'. If this means some kind of 'easier' science double award GCSE (that is, easier than a normal double award), then you may have a bit of catching up to do. On the other hand, if it is just a normal double integrated science, then it won't hold you back. I did three separate sciences at GCSE, and it gave me little to no advantage at the start of A level (I did bio, chem and phys).

Edit: Just Googled additional applied science, and while it seems you will have learnt less actual science content than others, it shouldn't impact at all, really. Honestly, I think you could quite comfortable do chemistry A level without any GCSE (given how irrelevant the GCSE is).
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sparklingTurkey
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#8
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(Original post by BeautifulPotato)
I finished biology last year but I'm actually revising for chemistry right now! haha! It's really good fun at A level and all you need to do is be prepared to understand new concepts and accept that GCSE knowledge is very simplified. But just approach it with a clear mind and you'll do well
Ahh awesome good luck with your revision and exams, i think A level will be better just because I want to do all of the subjects
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William Turtle
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#9
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#9
(Original post by sparklingTurkey)
Nice! are you still doing your A levels or have you finished now?


That sounds really good then , would you say it would worth looking at some of the gcse chemistry or does the first unit explain it all?

And are you guys looking at doing a degree or something with chemistry or science in general?
I'm in year 13, and applying to university this year (actually re-applying, because I changed my mind on the course) to study chemistry.
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sparklingTurkey
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#10
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(Original post by William Turtle)
You say 'applied science'. If this means some kind of 'easier' science double award GCSE (that is, easier than a normal double award), then you may have a bit of catching up to do. On the other hand, if it is just a normal double integrated science, then it won't hold you back. I did three separate sciences at GCSE, and it gave me little to no advantage at the start of A level (I did bio, chem and phys).

Edit: Just Googled additional applied science, and while it seems you will have learnt less actual science content than others, it shouldn't impact at all, really. Honestly, I think you could quite comfortable do chemistry A level without any GCSE (given how irrelevant the GCSE is).
Yeah, the majority of it seems to be common sense rather than actual science :confused:
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sparklingTurkey
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#11
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#11
(Original post by William Turtle)
I'm in year 13, and applying to university this year (actually re-applying, because I changed my mind on the course) to study chemistry.

(Original post by Dingo749)
It might be worth looking at moles (Essentially a unit of measurement), atoms and bonding Just to get a brief starting point But the first unit is pretty nice and simple to bring you in nicely I'm not doing a chemistry degree, I'm in year 13 and study Chemistry at the moment and will be going on to study Maths
Thanks for all the help, I think chemistry would be quite a fun thing to do at uni, I don't think I'd be brave enough to do maths though haha!
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