I get REALLY painful periods

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juliam
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I'm 17 and got my first period when I was 12. It was a bit crampy every time until I was about 15 or 16 - what I would consider normal cramps. I could get on with my life if I took enough painkillers. Since I was about 16, they've been awful, and nothing seems to help. I just don't know what to do. I lie on the floor, curled in a little ball crying for the first two days. I've had to take time off school. Now I've just worked out I'll have my period over my A level exams. I really need to sort this out! Has anyone else got any tips? This is well past the hot water bottle and paracetamol stage.
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Add!ction
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I'm the same as you, first few hours are agony and they always seem to coincide with work/holidays

I would suggest you see your GP as they can give you stronger pain killers or even put you on the pill.
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Reue
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Moved to health
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KiranS91
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Hi juliam, I would suggest going to see your gp for a blood test. Do you feel fatigued too? If you're low on iron and have heavy periods this can cause iron deficiency anaemia and excruciating periods.

When I first started I had no pain at all, then in my teens I started to get pains but it was nothing ibuprofen couldn't fix. Then last year I started to get excruciating period pains like what you're describing but didn't think there was anything I could do. I went to the doc for low energy and had a blood test, I was anaemic and was given iron tablets.the pain got much better and now I can have a period with little to no pain.

Iron is linked to heavy periods and child bearing in general and low iron is common in women especially vegetarians like myself so definitely see your GP


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jackie11
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I get painful periods too, I believe its due to an Omega 3 and Omega 6 imbalance.

When I was 18-20 years old, I was an absolute health freak, and had a very strict diet of which I cut out most of the things listed next to Omega 6 below, and I didnt have any period pain whatsoever for those years. Its now back with a vengence, I believe this is due to my currently loose diet, of which I am now making adjustments to.

Omega 6 is in everything basically, sunflower oil, olive oil, bread, cakes, biscuits, chocolate bars.

Omega 3 is in fatty fish and flaxseed.

Try cutting down on Omega 6 and start taking Cod Liver Oil (which is found in the health section of most supermarkets or superdrug or boots)

I have made some changes this month, I will try to let you know how my next period is.

Let me know what you decide to do.

And I feel your pain, you are not alone.
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PsychadelicScarf
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Have you put on any weight? I'm not sure if this would make them like that, but I know significantly loosing weight can make them stop.

Go see the docs, they should be able to help you.

I've also heard that masterbating just before your period helps lower the pain, because it massages the muscles. Haven't tried it myself though.
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demetria
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Have you considered taking the pill (with no breaks) at least until exams are over? I don't know if you've got something against the pill but surely it's better to take it than suffer and not do as well in your exams as you possibly could of done because that's going to affect your whole future. There's strong painkillers and drugs that stop spasms/cramps in the uterus too. Hope you get something sorted
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DorianGrayism
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Painful periods at a young age can be normal.

Have you been to see your GP?
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Georgie_M
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I agree with other posters go see your GP and ask about contraceptives, there are several types which stop periods or reduce pain. Your GP should be able to give you specific advice but from friends of mine who have had similar issues I don't think there is much you can do outside of contraceptives and painkillers unfortunately.
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Zoelingua
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(Original post by juliam)
I'm 17 and got my first period when I was 12. It was a bit crampy every time until I was about 15 or 16 - what I would consider normal cramps. I could get on with my life if I took enough painkillers. Since I was about 16, they've been awful, and nothing seems to help. I just don't know what to do. I lie on the floor, curled in a little ball crying for the first two days. I've had to take time off school. Now I've just worked out I'll have my period over my A level exams. I really need to sort this out! Has anyone else got any tips? This is well past the hot water bottle and paracetamol stage.

Go on the pill! I used to be exactly the same as you, and I would throw up every day that I was on too. It was a really horrible experience, but my mum said it might pass as I got older (that was when I was 15 and I'm 17 now). Got fed up of the pain and the sickness, booked myself an appointment with the nurse, explained what was going on and was prescribed microgynon no longer experience extreme pain or sickness!
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Kabloomybuzz
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Go and see your GP, there are things that can help, such as stronger painkillers like codeine and mefenamic acid.

I wouldn't just jump on the pill bandwagon without trying to investigate why they are so painful. The pill may well help but it would just be covering symptoms of something that could be more complex, such as endometriosis.
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blubimnotafish
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One of my friends had horrible period pains and after trying a couple of different versions of the pill she found one that reigned it in. Soooo... maybe try and see whether you might be able to get the pill and whether that works
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journeyofeducation
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(Original post by juliam)
I'm 17 and got my first period when I was 12. It was a bit crampy every time until I was about 15 or 16 - what I would consider normal cramps. I could get on with my life if I took enough painkillers. Since I was about 16, they've been awful, and nothing seems to help. I just don't know what to do. I lie on the floor, curled in a little ball crying for the first two days. I've had to take time off school. Now I've just worked out I'll have my period over my A level exams. I really need to sort this out! Has anyone else got any tips? This is well past the hot water bottle and paracetamol stage.
I used to be the exact same!
I started when I was 13 and had awful cramps in my stomach and thighs causing diahorrea (however you spell it!) and even vomiting at some points.
I went to the doctors and he told me I was anaemic with really heavy periods.
Now I'm on the pill and it's sooooo much easier to manage and less painful
I'd recommend seeing a doctor if it's disrupting school - hope this helps!


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jackie11
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I've just found the following info;

Women and omega-3’s

I strongly urge you to begin to supplement your diet so it includes omega-3 fatty acids. I’ve recommended the use of omega-3 at the clinic for close to 30 years and many women have had great improvement in their health. Taking omega-3 fatty acids can help is some many areas such as decreasing menstrual cramps, menopausal symptoms, and even breast cancer.

Research has actually found a link between increased menstrual pain and low omega-3 blood concentrations. Menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea) happen when your cell membranes release omega-6 fatty acids, which produce pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. As a result, cramps, headache, nausea, or other symptoms may be present.
Source http://www.womentowomen.com/inflamma...and-long-life/

and this;

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Taking Omega 3 fatty acids in supplement form can extremely important in the treatment of painful periods. Research has shown that women with low intakes of Omega 3 fatty acids (the ones that come from fish, linseed and walnuts) have more painful periods than women who have a good intake. The study that found this link also discovered that the extent of the pain was connected to the ratio or balance of the Omega 3 and Omega 6 fats. The women with the worst period pains ate a much lower level of Omega 3 fats in relation to Omega 6 fats.

Many of the women I see in the clinic have been taking evening primrose oil supplements – an Omega 6 fatty acid – for years and have not been eating enough Omega 3 oils, or taking them in supplement form, to counterbalance this. Some women are also taking combinations such as Omega 3, 6, and 9 in supplement form because they have heard that we need a good balance of all the Omega fatty acids. This is true, but you have to take into account what your own levels may be in the first place. It is no good adding in more Omega 6 if you have already got enough or in fact too much in your body. (You can now have a blood test to tell you if you have the correct levels of Omega 3 to Omega 6 in your body see below). To check whether you have sufficient levels of Omega 3 please click Omega 3 Deficiency Test

Period pains can be caused by substances called prostaglandins. Many prostaglandins are healthy; however, some increase your body’s sensitivity to pain and can cause your muscles to spasm and are termed “bad” prostaglandins. High intakes of saturated fats (found mainly in dairy and animal products) can encourage your body to produce bad prostaglandins, highly inflammatory substances that can cause swelling and pain in the pelvic area. The Omega 3 essential fatty acids are vital for your body to produce the anti-inflammatory ‘good’ prostaglandins.
Source: http://www.marilynglenville.com/wome...inful-periods/
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Munch98
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I suffer with mine aswell and I would suggest going to the doctor.

I went and got mefenamic acid ( think that's what it's called) 500mg tablets.

They get rid of the pain completely. After suffering for ages they are the only thing that really gets rid of the pain.

Hope this helps x


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missuniverse23
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(Original post by juliam)
I'm 17 and got my first period when I was 12. It was a bit crampy every time until I was about 15 or 16 - what I would consider normal cramps. I could get on with my life if I took enough painkillers. Since I was about 16, they've been awful, and nothing seems to help. I just don't know what to do. I lie on the floor, curled in a little ball crying for the first two days. I've had to take time off school. Now I've just worked out I'll have my period over my A level exams. I really need to sort this out! Has anyone else got any tips? This is well past the hot water bottle and paracetamol stage.
Same story!! My doctor diagnosed me with dysmenorrhea which apparently is a medical condition of pain during menstruation that interferes with daily activities. Still, dysmenorrhea is often defined simply as menstrual pain, or at least menstrual pain that is excessive.Menstrual pain is often used synonymously with menstrual cramps, but the latter may also refer to menstrual uterine contractions, which are generally of higher strength, duration and frequency than in the rest of the menstrual cycle.
Dysmenorrhea can feature different kinds of pain, including sharp, throbbing, dull, nauseating, burning, or shooting pain. Dysmenorrhea may precede menstruation by several days or may accompany it, and it usually subsides as menstruation tapers off. Dysmenorrhea may coexist with excessively heavy blood loss, known asmenorrhagia.
Secondary dysmenorrhea is diagnosed when symptoms are attributable to an underlying disease, disorder, or structural abnormality either within or outside the uterus. Primary dysmenorrhea is diagnosed when none of these are detected.

I cannot function properly whenever I am on my period. The first day is the worst. I sometimes feel like I am about to collapse with the intense pain and everything goes black and blurry. The pain is so intense that I feel like I will die soon. It's terrible, my brother though always cheers me up as he laughs at all my facial expression which is just simply me scrunching my face as I feel blood dripping. In my case, scrunching is not enough. I jump, scream, shout, curl up in a ball like you. once i m doing this next i am doing that - no exercise required for the next week. it's like im having air sex as well.
Only after taking prescribed painkiller, then its okay but I take about 4 a day.
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Kabloomybuzz
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(Original post by missuniverse23)
Same story!! My doctor diagnosed me with dysmenorrhea which apparently is a medical condition of pain during menstruation that interferes with daily activities. Still, dysmenorrhea is often defined simply as menstrual pain, or at least menstrual pain that is excessive.Menstrual pain is often used synonymously with menstrual cramps, but the latter may also refer to menstrual uterine contractions, which are generally of higher strength, duration and frequency than in the rest of the menstrual cycle.
Dysmenorrhea can feature different kinds of pain, including sharp, throbbing, dull, nauseating, burning, or shooting pain. Dysmenorrhea may precede menstruation by several days or may accompany it, and it usually subsides as menstruation tapers off. Dysmenorrhea may coexist with excessively heavy blood loss, known asmenorrhagia.
Secondary dysmenorrhea is diagnosed when symptoms are attributable to an underlying disease, disorder, or structural abnormality either within or outside the uterus. Primary dysmenorrhea is diagnosed when none of these are detected.

I cannot function properly whenever I am on my period. The first day is the worst. I sometimes feel like I am about to collapse with the intense pain and everything goes black and blurry. The pain is so intense that I feel like I will die soon. It's terrible, my brother though always cheers me up as he laughs at all my facial expression which is just simply me scrunching my face as I feel blood dripping. In my case, scrunching is not enough. I jump, scream, shout, curl up in a ball like you. once i m doing this next i am doing that - no exercise required for the next week. it's like im having air sex as well.
Only after taking prescribed painkiller, then its okay but I take about 4 a day.
I would seriously get the doctor to investigate this further rather than just easing the symptoms with painkillers, I would want to find out what was causing them.
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missuniverse23
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(Original post by Kabloomybuzz)
I would seriously get the doctor to investigate this further rather than just easing the symptoms with painkillers, I would want to find out what was causing them.
True but not if the doctor is your own dad
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juliam
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(Original post by missuniverse23)
True but not if the doctor is your own dad
You could go and see a female doctor
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lou_100
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(Original post by juliam)
I'm 17 and got my first period when I was 12. It was a bit crampy every time until I was about 15 or 16 - what I would consider normal cramps. I could get on with my life if I took enough painkillers. Since I was about 16, they've been awful, and nothing seems to help. I just don't know what to do. I lie on the floor, curled in a little ball crying for the first two days. I've had to take time off school. Now I've just worked out I'll have my period over my A level exams. I really need to sort this out! Has anyone else got any tips? This is well past the hot water bottle and paracetamol stage.
I went to the nurse recently at the doctors surgery and spoke to her about my painful cramps where I cry, throw up from the pain and can't do anything except curl up in a ball on my bed with 5 hot water bottles and painkillers (you're right, they ease a bit but don't really help...the pain is just too much).

I also get breakthrough bleeding sometimes or cramps when I'm not on my period, which might be different to your situation. But she basically suggested I try a different form of contraception which might ease/stop my periods altogether. If that helps, problem solved. If not, she'll get me some tests done for an underlying medical condition. Hopefully it won't come to that.

So I suggest seeing a female nurse about your pains. She might talk to you about going on (or changing) certain contraception in order to help the periods. Or she might talk to you about a couple tests.
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