Is there a a simple way to determine the structure of a compound? AQA CHEM1

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Lash
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I lose all my marks in past papers on the same kinds of questions.. the ones which are like "predict the type of crystal structure" or "predict the structure".

I know that for CHEM1 we only need to know about:
1. Ionic
2. Simple molecular
3. Macromolecular
4. Metallic

but I have no idea how to work out which one it will be, is there a simple way to work out what the structure/crystal structure will be?
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Picture~Perfect
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Well, looking at the periodic table is a big help, for example ionic bonding occurs between a metal and a non-metal atom, metallic bonding between two metal atoms and covalent bonding between two non-metal atoms. So the atoms involved are a big clue. As for macromolecular the examples are; diamond, graphite and silica.

I hope thats of some help.

Edit: Here is a link to an image showing a periodic table and the metal and non-metal atoms http://www.angelo.edu/faculty/kboudr...etals_fig1.gif
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Lash
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(Original post by Picture~Perfect)
Well, looking at the periodic table is a big help, for example ionic bonding occurs between a metal and a non-metal atom, metallic bonding between two metal atoms and covalent bonding between two non-metal atoms. So the atoms involved are a big clue. As for macromolecular the examples are; diamond, graphite and silica.

I hope thats of some help.

Edit: Here is a link to an image showing a periodic table and the metal and non-metal atoms http://www.angelo.edu/faculty/kboudr...etals_fig1.gif
Ok thank you that's great, how do you know if it's macromolecular or simple covalent though? If it's not one of the macromolecular examples then it is simple covalent? Thanks again
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Picture~Perfect
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(Original post by Lash)
Ok thank you that's great, how do you know if it's macromolecular or simple covalent though? If it's not one of the macromolecular examples then it is simple covalent? Thanks again
Basically yes, covalent bonds fall into two categories, simple which is a few atoms joined together and macromolecular/giant covalent which is the examples I mentioned.
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