Join TSR now and get answers to all your questions about uniSign up now
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I really want to have a job in ICT and I think that I really would like to do a computing degree. I feel that computer science wouldn't be the option for me as apprently it involves a lot of maths.

    I want to hopefully become an ICT Support anaylst or other jobs, not like a programmer or anything, although i wouldnt mind becoming one and also I heard that computing degrees include programming as well.

    Anyway do you think doing a "Computing" degree would be worth it? and i'd have the skills to be able to apply for different ict jobs after like an ict support anaylst, network or many others.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lamar008)
    I really want to have a job in ICT and I think that I really would like to do a computing degree. I feel that computer science wouldn't be the option for me as apprently it involves a lot of maths.

    I want to hopefully become an ICT Support anaylst or other jobs, not like a programmer or anything, although i wouldnt mind becoming one and also I heard that computing degrees include programming as well.

    Anyway do you think doing a "Computing" degree would be worth it? and i'd have the skills to be able to apply for different ict jobs after like an ict support anaylst, network or many others.
    It would make life a lot easier getting a Computer Science degree but it's not necessary. Hell, I know lots of programmers who haven't got a degree. You need to enjoy the idea of studying everything about Computing, and not just one aspect. Have a look at the various courses available and then decide if it's right for you.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WokSz)
    It would make life a lot easier getting a Computer Science degree but it's not necessary. Hell, I know lots of programmers who haven't got a degree. You need to enjoy the idea of studying everything about Computing, and not just one aspect. Have a look at the various courses available and then decide if it's right for you.
    Okay thanks but I'm not great at science I'm like a C grade student but Computer Science involves a lot of maths someone told me? is this true?

    and why would a Computer Science degree make my life a lot easier?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lamar008)
    Okay thanks but I'm not great at science I'm like a C grade student but Computer Science involves a lot of maths someone told me? is this true?

    and why would a Computer Science degree make my life a lot easier?
    Regarding whether the degree involves a significant portion of Maths or not, I may not be the best person to answer this. I studied Management at Undergraduate level but work in IT. I'm currently looking at a variety of Masters courses, with Computing as one of them.

    Unfortunately, in the corporate world these things make a difference. I can't explain why it makes a difference, but it just does. I'm not an elitist in any sense of the word, but from personal experience working in the industry having a degree helps.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    If you were not do a Computer Science I would say yes a Computering degree is the next best thing to do. But computer science gives you more of a broader field of computing and it's aspects

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Michael_98)
    If you were not do a Computer Science I would say yes a Computering degree is the next best thing to do. But computer science gives you more of a broader field of computing and it's aspects

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Okay that's the thing, I would do computer science but I anit fantastic at maths? im a C Grade student?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Phone the unis and ask what their computer science course requires in terms of maths.

    My partner works in IT and really enjoys it when with a good employer
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lamar008)
    Okay that's the thing, I would do computer science but I anit fantastic at maths? im a C Grade student?
    Depends on where you do your degree the top unis have a high maths/theoretical basis (as far as I'm aware) and others have a much more practical approach

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Most computing degrees would require at least basic single-variable calculus, definitely Boolean algebra (which is pretty easy), and some linear algebra (if you want to get into 3D graphics, etc). Other than that there's not much math (unless you want to specialize in numerical analysis, etc). So probably about 3 first year maths courses. Whether that's a lot or not depends on how much you hate maths.

    If your goal is just to become a support analyst, though, don't bother with a university degree. A 1 year training program will do, and is usually much cheaper.

    A computing degree is really only useful for people who want to become programmers or researchers in computing.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    Most computing degrees would require at least basic single-variable calculus, definitely Boolean algebra (which is pretty easy), and some linear algebra (if you want to get into 3D graphics, etc). Other than that there's not much math (unless you want to specialize in numerical analysis, etc). So probably about 3 first year maths courses. Whether that's a lot or not depends on how much you hate maths.

    If your goal is just to become a support analyst, though, don't bother with a university degree. A 1 year training program will do, and is usually much cheaper.

    A computing degree is really only useful for people who want to become programmers or researchers in computing.
    Oh ok thanks for posting, but.
    because I want to hopefully be employed in the IT industry such as jobs like an ICT Support analyst or etc, which would be better? Computing - which seems to be more about computers etc, or computer science is more math? Because I thought having a Computing Degree would hlep for employment and I'd learn more with a wider range of ict jobs? i want to do something like a support analyst or data base, or maybe programming really. any of them. Or like an ICT manager or specialist. so yeah.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lamar008)
    Oh ok thanks for posting, but.
    because I want to hopefully be employed in the IT industry such as jobs like an ICT Support analyst or etc, which would be better? Computing - which seems to be more about computers etc, or computer science is more math? Because I thought having a Computing Degree would hlep for employment and I'd learn more with a wider range of ict jobs? i want to do something like a support analyst or data base, or maybe programming really. any of them. Or like an ICT manager or specialist. so yeah.
    As far as I am aware computing and computer science is often used interchangably and it just deoends on the uni. I may be wrong though :/

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I decided to do computing instead of computer science because I'm not very good at maths either xD that said, I applied to a couple of Unis for computer science because they weren't devoted to mathematics. I've been told that I should be doing physics and maths but I got Cs for both of those at GCSE and I'm not that confident with them. I do AQA A-Level English literature, English language and ICT and despite people telling me I wouldn't get in, all 5 Unis offered me a place.

    Technology is getting bigger and better so there will always be jobs available, jobs that don't even exist today. Also, because computer science is becoming a more popular course (they'll be offering more courses, e.g. for GCSE, or so a Uni tutor told me on one of the open days) they'll need people to teach it; even if you don't want to teach, it just shows you how the demand for technology jobs will increase!

    I say if you really want to go for it, go for it ^_^
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    In North America Computing and Computer Science are the same thing and used interchangeably. Not sure about UK, but seems to be the case, too.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Furandesu)
    I decided to do computing instead of computer science because I'm not very good at maths either xD that said, I applied to a couple of Unis for computer science because they weren't devoted to mathematics. I've been told that I should be doing physics and maths but I got Cs for both of those at GCSE and I'm not that confident with them. I do AQA A-Level English literature, English language and ICT and despite people telling me I wouldn't get in, all 5 Unis offered me a place.

    Technology is getting bigger and better so there will always be jobs available, jobs that don't even exist today. Also, because computer science is becoming a more popular course (they'll be offering more courses, e.g. for GCSE, or so a Uni tutor told me on one of the open days) they'll need people to teach it; even if you don't want to teach, it just shows you how the demand for technology jobs will increase!

    I say if you really want to go for it, go for it ^_^
    Hey okay then, so are you doing Computing right now? and do you t hink it's good?
    but what i want to know is would I be capable of doing jobs like a ICT Support analyst, network administrator, or ict specialist etc...from having a Computing Degree?? Not a computer science degree? or can i with both? any anyone answer this question pls
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    In North America Computing and Computer Science are the same thing and used interchangeably. Not sure about UK, but seems to be the case, too.
    Imperial's Computer Science degree is called Computing but I don't know if that's the only example.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lamar008)
    Hey okay then, so are you doing Computing right now? and do you t hink it's good?
    but what i want to know is would I be capable of doing jobs like a ICT Support analyst, network administrator, or ict specialist etc...from having a Computing Degree?? Not a computer science degree? or can i with both? any anyone answer this question pls
    Those things have very little to do with computer science, besides the fact that they both involve working with computers (so does being a secretary).

    You will probably pick up the basics of networking etc in a computing degree, but that's definitely not the focus.

    I would not recommend getting a computing/CS degree (they are the same thing) if your goal is to get one of those jobs. Computing is really for programmers, and programming is VERY different from being a support analyst or network administrator. There is almost no overlap at all.

    I don't know the equivalents in the UK, but there are courses designed for people who want to be support analysts or network administrators. They are much shorter/easier, and teach very different things than a computing degree.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    Those things have very little to do with computer science, besides the fact that they both involve working with computers (so does being a secretary).

    You will probably pick up the basics of networking etc in a computing degree, but that's definitely not the focus.

    I would not recommend getting a computing/CS degree (they are the same thing) if your goal is to get one of those jobs. Computing is really for programmers, and programming is VERY different from being a support analyst or network administrator. There is almost no overlap at all.

    I don't know the equivalents in the UK, but there are courses designed for people who want to be support analysts or network administrators. They are much shorter/easier, and teach very different things than a computing degree.
    Oh right okay? but if i do a computing degree wont i leaern more and employers might want to take me on? im also going to look into them courses you say designed for anaylsts and administrators.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    You will learn more probably, but it's very different, and there is only very little overlap, so it's not really relevant.

    You'll learn more by doing a degree in Medicine, too, but that's also irrelevant.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    You will learn more probably, but it's very different, and there is only very little overlap, so it's not really relevant.

    You'll learn more by doing a degree in Medicine, too, but that's also irrelevant.
    Hmm okay well my uncle did a computing degree and he said he wishes he did it earlier on in life.
    I'm not exactly sure what he does but he does some kind of officer / development thing, he sometimes create programs for the NHS, etc. So I might want to still consider doing a Computing degree, i've always been into programming but its just since i have tried learning it myself and have given up i just thought maybe I want to become something else in the ICT Industry like a support analyst or ict manager/specialist. If you know what I mean . But I'm doing college for 2 years after my exam also.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lamar008)
    Hmm okay well my uncle did a computing degree and he said he wishes he did it earlier on in life.
    I'm not exactly sure what he does but he does some kind of officer / development thing, he sometimes create programs for the NHS, etc. So I might want to still consider doing a Computing degree, i've always been into programming but its just since i have tried learning it myself and have given up i just thought maybe I want to become something else in the ICT Industry like a support analyst or ict manager/specialist. If you know what I mean . But I'm doing college for 2 years after my exam also.
    I know what you mean.

    It makes sense for him because he is a developer/programmer, and being a programmer is a very rewarding career, too, if you enjoy it. I am starting a master's in computing myself, too.

    But it has almost nothing to do with being a support analyst or ICT specialist. So unfortunately you do have to pick one path and stick with it.

    Programming is more creative and fun, and usually pays much better (at least in North America), but also much more difficult, and you have to get a Computing degree.

    However, if you do a computing degree, you will have a lot of difficulties getting a support analyst/network admin job, because there are a lot of people who have done courses designed for those roles, and they would be more qualified than you will be.

    It's like saying you want to be either an investment banker or a chef... They don't hire investment bankers with a degree in Culinary Arts, or chefs with a degree in Finance. It's the same thing with development/ICT. You just have to pick one.
 
 
 
Poll
Which pet is the best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.